gregferrara
gregferrara

It was in grade school that I starting going out of my way to see whatever movies I could from the Golden Era of Hollywood, movies I had read about in the "Motion Pictures" entry in the encyclopedia. I'd stay up late or convince my mom to take me to whatever revival in whatever town I could find. It was with my mom that I saw the double feature of "Creature from the Black Lagoon/It Came from Outer Space," both in their original 3-D, complete with the red and blue glasses, and even though she wanted to leave after the first feature, I convinced her to stay for the whole thing.

It was around this time that my middle school library got a brand new book, just published! And it was about film! That didn't happen often, I can tell you. The book, published in 1976, was "Silents to Sound: A History of the Movies" by Juliet P. Schoen, an author I'd not heard of before and have not heard of since but it was she who introduced me to the movies in a real way. Oh sure, the book was general knowledge, just like the encyclopedia, but it had so much more detail, so many wonderful stories. I read it every week in the library until, one day, quite absent-mindedly, I put it in my backpack and walked out. I didn't mean to and promised myself I'd return it just as soon as I read it a couple more times. Then a little more. Then just a little more. Okay, just one more time!

I've still got it today.

Though it no longer holds anything for me in the way of film knowledge or analysis, I can't get rid of it and the school doesn't even exist anymore anyway. When I started writing online in 2007 I named my blog "Cinema Styles: From Silents to Sound." By 2009 I had dropped the "From Silents to Sound" part but the love remained, the film studies continued and the reception of so much joy, of spiritual fulfillment, taken from the cinema daily is something that remains powerful to this day.

Posts by gregferrara

Well, today is Christmas Day.  At this point, the many of you who celebrate Christmas will either be elated, exhausted, disappointed, or a combination of all three.  Especially if you’re a kid (which means you’re probably not reading this) since you got very little sleep in anticipation of the presents you were going to get […]

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Later today, much later, the 1925 version of Ben-Hur runs on TCM and it got me to thinking about a post I did almost a year ago, There’s This One Scene, where I discussed movies that have one or two scenes I really like and not much else.  Ben-Hur, a fine production (both this and […]

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For years and years, Hollywood didn’t do much in the way of sequels.  Certain successful movies had them, like Going My Way which had The Bells of St. Mary’s, but most successful movies, from Gone with the Wind to Casablanca, never had their producers opting for a continuation of the story.  Instead, Hollywood did series, […]

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Today on TCM, the Blake Edwards remake of the German film, Viktor and Viktoria, this time as Victor/Victoria.  The original has actually been remade a few times but the Blake Edwards version is the only one I know very well and that’s possibly because it contains one of my favorite actors ever, James Garner.  Garner […]

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Looking at the schedule for TCM today, I find myself once again drawn to discussing favorite movies of directors, actors, and writers that aren’t the obvious choices for most people.  Of course, when I think to myself that I love a film that no one else likes, I know in reality that plenty of other […]

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Today, TCM offers up Cimarron, the 1960 remake of the 1931 adaptation of the 1929 novel by Edna Ferber that employs the Oklahoma Land Rush as a major plot element.  Also on today, The Sheepman, from 1958, which concerns both sheep herders and cattle ranchers fussin’ and a fightin’.   Then there’s 3:10 to Yuma, […]

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Turner Classic Movies and Fathom Events will be hosting a theatrical screening across the country this weekend of the classic from 1953, Roman Holiday, starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck (see more info here).  If you haven’t seen it, this would be the perfect opportunity to take it in, capping a holiday weekend with a […]

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Today, TCM airs one of the biggest big budget, all-star cast movies of all time, producer David O’Selznick’s 1947 Duel in the Sun, the movie he hoped would equal the success of his previous big budget extravaganza, Gone with the Wind.  It didn’t and ultimately was a disappointment, also because he wanted it to succeed […]

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Today TCM celebrates the career of the legendary Maureen O’Hara with a selection of movies that also features some of her favorite acting partners, including the also legendary John Wayne and Henry Fonda who, as it turns out, had children who entered the biz just like they did.  One of John Wayne’s kids, Patrick, is even […]

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Today, TCM airs Mogambo, John Ford’s 1953 remake of Victor Fleming’s 1932 pre-code Red Dust.  Despite the 21 year gap between the films, Clark Gable played the lead in both.  A part of the justification for the remake was that they could go further with the story in 1953 than they had in 1932 which […]

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