Kimberly Lindbergs (aka cinebeats)
Kimberly Lindbergs

I've been a movie lover for as long as I can remember. I grew up on a steady diet of horror cinema, spaghetti westerns, American musicals, espionage adventures and Japanese monster movies that gave me the ability to appreciate films that were often marginalized by other film fans and overlooked by many critics. As I got older my interest in cinema expanded into areas like Italian Neorealism as well as the French, British and Japanese New Wave.

My first film reviews were published in my junior high school newspaper and when I started attending college I concentrated on film studies. For the last 10 years I’ve been writing about film regularly at Cinebeats.com and I currently write for Turner Classic Movies at TCM.com and contributed to their official Movie Morlocks blog for the past 6 years. Some of my other writing accomplishments include providing liner notes for the CD release of John Barry’s soundtrack for BOOM! (1968), writing an overview of Lee Marvin’s performance in POINT BLANK (1967) for the 2008 Woodstock Film Festival guide and being nominated for a Rondo Award thanks to my appreciation of classic and not-so-classic horror films. I’ve also contributed to various film related magazines and websites including Cineaste, Fandor, Paracinema and The Cultural Gutter. In 2012 I was invited to join the Alliance of Women Film Journalists.

Besides my Cinebeats blog, you can also find me on Twitter @cinebeats.

Posts by Kimberly Lindbergs

Last October TCM in association with WIF (Women in Film) launched their Trailblazing Women film initiative by airing a month of movies made by women. Many of the films and filmmakers highlighted during the month-long programming event were often overlooked, underseen and deserving of a wider audience. Trailblazing Women was groundbreaking television that introduced the […]

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Preston Sturges directs Harold Llyod & Frances Ramden on the set of The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947, aka Mad Wednesday) airing tonight on TCM “There are some wonderful pictures to be made, and God willing I will make some of them.” – Preston Sturges The talented director, screenwriter and producer Preston Sturges, was often […]

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Yul Brynner in The King and I. TCM & Fathom Events are screening this classic musical on August 28 and 31 in select theaters across the U.S. “If you live long enough and you’re lucky you may get the chance to see two or three originals in your lifetime.” – TV commercial advertising the 1982 […]

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Angie Dickinson in 1958Angie Dickinson takes center stage in TCM’s ongoing Summer Under the Stars programming today. The leggy mid-western beauty first achieved widespread general and critical attention for her role in Howard Hawks’ Rio Bravo (1959) airing 10 PM EST/7 PM PST. Hawks often referred to the actress as his “discovery” but in truth, […]

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Roddy McDowall surrounded by some of the celebrity portraits he took On Monday, Aug. 15, Roddy McDowall will be headlining TCM’s Summer Under the Stars line-up. McDowell spent most of his life in the spotlight after landing his first film role in the British children’s film Scruffy (1938) when he was only 10-years-old. In 1940 […]

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“When Fay Wray was a child she wasn’t permitted to scream because her throat muscles were delicate and it was feared her voice would be ruined. When she grew up she screamed her way to fame in horror pictures!” – from a 1934 issue of Hollywood magazine TCM’s annual Summer Under the Stars celebration is […]

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Artist and pop culture chronicler Jack Davis passed away this week at age 91 after a long and productive career that spanned decades and traversed many mediums. Throughout his life, Davis won numerous awards and was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame in 2003. Today the prolific illustrator is probably best remembered for […]

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On the last two Sundays of July, TCM is airing a selection of groundbreaking films made by African-Americans during the early 20th Century. Faced with racism within the industry these pioneering filmmakers were forced to work outside of the Hollywood studio system. Independently they created hundreds of diverse “race films” addressing the concerns of black […]

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“This is America quaking, this movie, seen the way only a gifted artist can possibly draw his photographic attention to these events . . . the roots and fruit of social turmoil, and the media pervading and even anticipating the event. The media’s involvement in the motion picture, its place in the movie, is more […]

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Pull up a chair and pour yourself a nice cold glass of something. It’s time for my annual nonfiction Summer Reading Suggestions!

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Streamline is the official blog of FilmStruck, a new subscription service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films.