Still Searching for Old Hollywood, Part 3

hwood3lamarr2Back by popular demand is another installment of “Searching for Old Hollywood” based on my recent trek to Hollywood Forever Cemetery looking for clues to uncover some unique or forgotten insight into the lives of big-name stars and other celebrities. The first part focused on the final resting places of lesser-known film industry figures, while the second spotlighted the legendary stars of Old Hollywood’s romantic and often notorious past. As with the first two parts, I wanted to find a thread to tie together the figures for this final installment. I decided to focus on epitaphs and inscriptions.

The grave markers of Maila Nurmi, better known as Vampira, and John Huston are across the lane from each other. The ghoulish television hostess and legendary director have nothing in common save for their markers, which display imagery that provides clues to their lives. Nurmi hosted her program of old horror movies on KABC-TV for only a year, but she parlayed the publicity into a career, more or less. Vampira became Nurmi’s contribution to popular culture, and her only claim to fame; when Cassandra Peterson came too close to her act with the character Elvira, Nurmi unsuccessfully sued. Nurmi died alone and broke on January 10, 2008, her decomposing body found by an acquaintance. With no named next of kin, red tape prevented her from being interred until February 17, when her cremated remains were buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Loyal fans spent a year throwing fundraisers to secure the money for a gravestone that befitted her image. Erected in July, 2009, it reads “Maila Nurmi, 1922-2008, Vampira, Hollywood Legend,” and includes an etching of her wearing that tattered gothic gown, which showed off her legendary 17-inch waist. In other words, the gravestone features all the signifiers to her image that a fan would want to remember. (On a personal note, I discovered that Nurmi, who was born in Finland, spent her youth in the Finnish community in my hometown of Ashtabula, Ohio.)

Hwood3mailanurmigravesiteIn contrast, John Huston’s marker sports a Celtic knot, an image that had personal meaning for him—not necessarily his fans. Many times, the director had visited friends in Lugalla, County Wicklow in Ireland. Gazing out the window of a sporting lodge on his first visit, he became entranced with the beautiful countryside. In his autobiography, he noted, “I’ll never forget that first impression. I was Ireland’s own from that moment.” In the early 1950s, he made St. Clerans, County Galway, his home. However, the Irish landscape wasn’t the only reason for his decision to become an expatriate.  The bullying tactics of the Senate’s House on Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) coupled with Joseph McCarthy’s own, self-serving investigation to uncover Commies under everyone’s bed disgusted Huston. And, he found the resulting actions of some of his peers disturbing. Never again would Huston reside solely in America. The simple symbol is a complex reminder of his Irish heritage, his love for the beauty and history of Ireland, and his decision to be an expatriate.

Hwood3hustonJesse L. Lasky was laid to rest in the large mausoleum called Abbey of the Psalms.  Lasky, who is considered one of the three founding fathers of Hollywood alongside Cecil B. DeMille and Samuel Goldwyn, served as Vice President of Production at Famous Players-Lasky, which later evolved into Paramount Pictures. He was one of the most powerful moguls in the industry during the 1920s. He died a year after publishing his 1958 autobiography I Toot My Own Horn. Considering the title of his biography, the epitaph on his vault should come as no surprise:

“Beloved son of California who in 1913/headed the company that produced/the first feature length motion picture made in Hollywood.His greatness never lacked simplicity. Carry the song along the passage/you, the soul of all there is/in glory forevermore.”hwood3lasky

Hwood3lamarrTurning 30 or 40 must be difficult for stars who are famous for their youthful beauty and know that their careers will fade with each landmark age. Barbara La Marr, who was dubbed “the Girl Who Was Too Beautiful” by Adela Rogers St. John, never made it to 30. Hence her epitaph on her crypt in the Cathedral Mausoleum, “With God in the Joy of Beauty and Youth,” reflects her star image, which was tweaked in death to signify the bittersweet destiny of a beauty who remains forever young. La Marr lived her life like she was never going to make it to 30. Married five times in her 29 years, she also had a child by an unnamed lover, had a fling with John Gilbert, and had an affair with her former dance partner, Robert Hobday, during her third marriage.  Hobday’s sister, Virginia, who had been La Marr’s manager, married Jules Roth, owner of Hollywood Memorial Cemetery (the original name of Hollywood Forever). Roth had also been La Marr’s former lover. I wonder when she had time to star in 27 films. Fond of the fast lane, she drank heavily and was rumored to have indulged in drugs. La Marr once remarked that she rarely slept over two hours per night. This lifestyle contributed to her death from tuberculosis and nephritis. (The photo at the top is from La Marr’s funeral.)

Hwood3flemingCompared to Barbara La Marr, stuntman-turned-cameraman-turned director Victor Fleming (The Wizard of Oz; A Guy Named Joe) led a dull life, though most of us would find it filled with intrigue and romance. In the silent era, he courted several movie stars famous for their sexual appetites or romantic exploits, including Clara Bow, Bessie Love, Norma Shearer, Lupe Velez, and Alice White, among others. In 1933, he began an affair with the wife of his good friend, director Arthur Rosson, which resulted in her pregnancy. The pair eventually married, but in 1948, Fleming embarked on a torrid affair with Ingrid Bergman, the star of his version of Joan of Arc. His inflamed passion for 29-year-old Bergman must have been too much for the 59-year-old director, because he died of a heart attack two months after the film’s release. Or, it could have been the stress caused by the critical and financial failure of Joan of Arc. After all, he died on January 6, the real Joan of Arc’s birthday. Or, perhaps it was the drinking.  Given his messy personal life, the epitaph on Fleming’s crypt made me curious: “He Leadeth Me.” The phrase is from the 23rd Psalm: “He leadeth me in the path of righteousness.” Fleming didn’t strike me as a religious man. I checked David Denby’s biography Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master, which reveals that his mother actually selected the grave plate for his crypt, perhaps hoping for a more spiritual journey for her son in the afterlife.  

Hwood3power

Every article about Hollywood Forever includes a reference to the gravesite of Tyrone Power, which is located next to the tomb of Marion Davies. Instead of a traditional gravestone, Power’s final resting place is marked by a marble bench decorated in classical motifs. At one end stands a large marble tome representing a volume of classical plays because it features the masks of comedy and tragedy on the spine. The seat on the bench includes two passages from Act V of Hamlet. The first is spoken by Hamlet and the second by Horatio after Hamlet dies.

THE PAPARAZZI BEHAVE IN THEIR USUAL GRACIOUS WAY AT POWER'S FUNERAL.

THE PAPARAZZI BEHAVE IN THEIR USUAL GRACIOUS MANNER AT POWER’S FUNERAL.

“There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow/ If it be now, tis’ not to come; /If it be not to come, it will be now; /If it be not now, yet it will come; / The readiness is all.”

“Good Night, Sweet Prince, And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.”

Nothing about the unusual marker reflects anything about Power’s career as the too-handsome movie star exploited for his attractiveness. On the surface, it references his career in the theater. Before becoming a successful romantic lead at 20th Century Fox, Power enjoyed his stint in the legitimate theater as part of Katharine Cornell’s summer stock troupe. In the 1950s, he periodically returned to the stage, playing the lead in Mister Roberts in London, a part opposite Judith Anderson and Raymond Massey in Charles Laughton’s production of John Brown’s Body, and various roles in other distinguished stage plays. When he moved to Hollywood in the early 1930s, he went as a bona fide actor.

CESAR ROMERO GAVE THE EULOGY.

CESAR ROMERO GAVE THE EULOGY.

However, according to Jeanine Basinger’s terrific analysis of the star system titled The Star Machine, the studio did not need him to be a talented actor. Instead, they exploited his looks and sex appeal in every way: The studio assigned him to play romantic fantasy figures such as pirates or rogues; in his films, he was deliberately framed or blocked to be gazed upon like a passive object of beauty; the Fox publicity department repeatedly compared him to Valentino. In a fanzine, a Fox press agent ghost-penned an article calling Power “a dreamy boy with the melting eyes.” Bizarrely phrased, but you get the idea. When he wanted to marry French actress Annabella, studio execs and press agents turned on him, because they knew he would lose some of his devoted female fans. At that point Power realized the cost of becoming a male movie star, and he considered his handsome features and star image to be limitations to his career. After he returned from a three-year stint in the Marines during WWII, the tension between his desire to be taken seriously and his star image increased. Many movie stars found ways to maneuver within their star image and even took advantage of it, but Power did not appreciate the subtleties of the star system. As Basinger noted, he knew “he wasn’t going to be asked to play Hamlet,” an ironic comment considering his epitaph.

THE ACTIVE PALLBEARERS WERE MARINES, BECAUSE POWER STAYED IN THE MARINE RESERVE AFTER WWII.

THE ACTIVE PALLBEARERS WERE MARINES, BECAUSE POWER STAYED IN THE MARINE RESERVE AFTER WWII.

In small ways, Power rebelled and rejected his career as a movie star, but he did not turn his back on it. He lobbied to star in films such as Nightmare Alley, complained privately to friends, returned to the stage occasionally, left Fox in 1952, and drank too much, which took its toll on his beautiful physique and features. His theater-themed gravesite reflects Power’s rebuff of the movie career that made him famous, while acknowledging his respect for what he considered serious acting. The two quotes from Hamlet seem more than a nod to every serious actor’s dream role. The first, spoken by Hamlet, suggests that humans have no control over any events but a larger guiding hand determines their fate—and, according to Basinger, Power felt, well, powerless in the hands of studio execs. And, the “Good night, sweet prince” quote associates the tragic tone surrounding Hamlet’s death to that of Tyrone Power, who had a massive heart attack while shooting Solomon and Sheba, yet another costume flick. He was fighting a duel with George Sanders, a familiar arch-villain in Power’s historical romances and pirate films when his heart failed. He died that day, November 15, 1958; he was 44 years old.

JAMES STEWART AND SPENCER TRACY AT POWER'S FUNERAL

JAMES STEWART AND SPENCER TRACY AT POWER’S FUNERAL

The memorial service was held at the Chapel of the Psalms at Hollywood Forever. The active pallbearers were officers from the U.S. Marine Corps, but honorary pallbearers included Charles Laughton, Raymond Massey, Tommy Noonan, Cesar Romero, George Sidney, and Lew Wasserman, among others. Romero gave the eulogy, which featured a tribute written by Sanders just hours after Power had been stricken on the set: “I shall always remember Tyrone as a bountiful man, a man who gave freely of himself. It mattered not to whom he gave. His concern was in the giving. I shall always remember his wonderful smile, a smile that would light up the darkest hour of the day, like a sunburst. I shall always remember Tyrone Power as a man who gave more of himself than it was wise for him to give, until in the end, he gave his life.” Henry King, who had directed Power in Jesse James, and introduced him to flying, flew over the funeral in his private plane. King later recalled, “Knowing his love for flying and feeling that I had started it, I flew over his funeral procession and memorial park during his burial, and felt that he was with me.” Power’s grave marker may have referenced serious theater, but his funeral was all Hollywood.

They say that dead men tell no tales, but through their unique gravesites, the famous and the forgotten at Hollywood Forever still manage to grab our attention, confess their sins, and remind us of their place in pop culture.

32 Responses Still Searching for Old Hollywood, Part 3
Posted By Kendra : June 10, 2013 12:21 pm

I really enjoy visiting old and/or famous cemeteries (best if they combine elements of both) and looking for the resting places of famous people. I used to go to Hollywood Forever for the Cinespia screenings when I lived in Southern CA, and when I was home last Christmas a friend and I spent an afternoon lunching with Errol Flynn at Forest Lawn. It made me sad to hear from the caretakers at these cemeteries that many of the classic film stars never really receive visitors anymore, be they friends or family.

I live in London now and many of the big cemeteries (and come of the small ones) house interesting figures from the film world.

Anyway, absolutely fascinating post, thanks!

Posted By Kendra : June 10, 2013 12:21 pm

I really enjoy visiting old and/or famous cemeteries (best if they combine elements of both) and looking for the resting places of famous people. I used to go to Hollywood Forever for the Cinespia screenings when I lived in Southern CA, and when I was home last Christmas a friend and I spent an afternoon lunching with Errol Flynn at Forest Lawn. It made me sad to hear from the caretakers at these cemeteries that many of the classic film stars never really receive visitors anymore, be they friends or family.

I live in London now and many of the big cemeteries (and come of the small ones) house interesting figures from the film world.

Anyway, absolutely fascinating post, thanks!

Posted By Heidi : June 10, 2013 1:12 pm

Great third post for the series! I am interested in the Tyrone Power story. We just got back from Pensacola, FL, and a tour of the air base there. While on the back lot tour, where planes are stored while waiting to be repaired or painted, the guide showed us the plane the Tyrone Power flew to drop supplies to POW’s. (I believe that what he said.) Anyway, I wondered if there was any reference to his time in the military on his stone. My Mother-in-law (and FIL) are very much into genealogy, and often visit grave yards around the world looking for relatives of their far flung group. I have always been interested in the rituals surrounding death and find that grave stones, and the symbols that are on them, or that make them up, are most fascinating. Some of the stones in Philadelphia near where Franklin is buried are most fascinating,with their intricate Mason symbols and some of the less known death symbols. I remember the first time I saw an image of the person on the stone. It was carved into it, now they have medallions that they inset. I wonder what percentage of these epitaphs are what the actor themselves desired to be on the stones compared to what their families chose for them. (or fans, as the case may be.)

Posted By Heidi : June 10, 2013 1:12 pm

Great third post for the series! I am interested in the Tyrone Power story. We just got back from Pensacola, FL, and a tour of the air base there. While on the back lot tour, where planes are stored while waiting to be repaired or painted, the guide showed us the plane the Tyrone Power flew to drop supplies to POW’s. (I believe that what he said.) Anyway, I wondered if there was any reference to his time in the military on his stone. My Mother-in-law (and FIL) are very much into genealogy, and often visit grave yards around the world looking for relatives of their far flung group. I have always been interested in the rituals surrounding death and find that grave stones, and the symbols that are on them, or that make them up, are most fascinating. Some of the stones in Philadelphia near where Franklin is buried are most fascinating,with their intricate Mason symbols and some of the less known death symbols. I remember the first time I saw an image of the person on the stone. It was carved into it, now they have medallions that they inset. I wonder what percentage of these epitaphs are what the actor themselves desired to be on the stones compared to what their families chose for them. (or fans, as the case may be.)

Posted By Susan Doll : June 10, 2013 1:37 pm

It’s great to hear that there are other graveyard aficionados besides me. Sometimes my interest in graveyards strikes people as macabre, but it is really about history to me. It is such a direct way into researching the past.

Heidi: There is nothing regarding Power’s grave marker to indicate his service. But, as I mentioned above the military was a presence during his funeral. He was very proud of his service and opted to stay in the reserves after the war.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 10, 2013 1:37 pm

It’s great to hear that there are other graveyard aficionados besides me. Sometimes my interest in graveyards strikes people as macabre, but it is really about history to me. It is such a direct way into researching the past.

Heidi: There is nothing regarding Power’s grave marker to indicate his service. But, as I mentioned above the military was a presence during his funeral. He was very proud of his service and opted to stay in the reserves after the war.

Posted By poorarchivist : June 10, 2013 2:54 pm

This is so interesting. Thanks for posting!

Posted By poorarchivist : June 10, 2013 2:54 pm

This is so interesting. Thanks for posting!

Posted By swac44 : June 10, 2013 3:07 pm

Oddly, I just logged onto Movie Morlocks looking for the previous Hollywood Forever installment, and here’s a brand spanking new one. The reason was to make note of a tangential discovery made when I was searching Google Maps for the house used for the Hudson sisters’ residence in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane (172 South McCadden Place, near Hancock Park), and zooming out I noticed Hollywood Forever is only a few blocks away. Funny how a film about Hollywood’s decaying past was shot just a short distance from the spot where many of its stars of yore lay buried, with the Paramount lot sitting directly inbetween.

Posted By swac44 : June 10, 2013 3:07 pm

Oddly, I just logged onto Movie Morlocks looking for the previous Hollywood Forever installment, and here’s a brand spanking new one. The reason was to make note of a tangential discovery made when I was searching Google Maps for the house used for the Hudson sisters’ residence in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane (172 South McCadden Place, near Hancock Park), and zooming out I noticed Hollywood Forever is only a few blocks away. Funny how a film about Hollywood’s decaying past was shot just a short distance from the spot where many of its stars of yore lay buried, with the Paramount lot sitting directly inbetween.

Posted By swac44 : June 10, 2013 3:42 pm

For a similar, if more historically wide-ranging, graveyard experience on the East Coast, I recommend a trip to Brooklyn’s massive Green-Wood Cemetery, which hosts regular themed tours, ranging from it’s sports-related denizens (Henry Chadwick, Charles Ebbets), political figures (Boss Tweed), and stars of stage & screen & art(Leonard Bernstein, Jean-Michel Basquiat).

(Added bonus: Green-Wood is also inhabited by a flock of parrots, who have taken up residence in the neighbourhood after being “liberated” from a container at JFK Airport in the 1960s by some enterprising hoods a la the guys in Goodfellas.)

Unfortunately, the website doesn’t have great detail about its famous residents, but it seems like the tours are a great deal more informative:
http://www.green-wood.com/2010/famous-residents/

And I know how John Huston felt about Galway, the West Coast of Ireland claimed my heart as well when I was there, and I’m aching to return one of these days. According to family lore, our family tree has roots in County Cork, but the area around Galway Bay is just as magical as the old song makes it out to be.

Posted By swac44 : June 10, 2013 3:42 pm

For a similar, if more historically wide-ranging, graveyard experience on the East Coast, I recommend a trip to Brooklyn’s massive Green-Wood Cemetery, which hosts regular themed tours, ranging from it’s sports-related denizens (Henry Chadwick, Charles Ebbets), political figures (Boss Tweed), and stars of stage & screen & art(Leonard Bernstein, Jean-Michel Basquiat).

(Added bonus: Green-Wood is also inhabited by a flock of parrots, who have taken up residence in the neighbourhood after being “liberated” from a container at JFK Airport in the 1960s by some enterprising hoods a la the guys in Goodfellas.)

Unfortunately, the website doesn’t have great detail about its famous residents, but it seems like the tours are a great deal more informative:
http://www.green-wood.com/2010/famous-residents/

And I know how John Huston felt about Galway, the West Coast of Ireland claimed my heart as well when I was there, and I’m aching to return one of these days. According to family lore, our family tree has roots in County Cork, but the area around Galway Bay is just as magical as the old song makes it out to be.

Posted By DevlinCarnate : June 10, 2013 4:52 pm

i was wondering when you’d get to Tyrone Power’s memorial bench,i heard about it years ago and it always intrigued me,was it a beyond the grave reference to the stifling of his career?…don’t get me wrong,i loved all his swashbuckling roles,but when Nightmare Alley finally came out on video a few years back it was an epiphany,a star kicking back at studios in a movie they didn’t want him to make,and his turn as an aging playboy in Witness For The Prosecution just cemented it for me…he looked like Dorian Gray,debauched,unglamorous,but still with a serpentine charm that kept me guessing until the end

Posted By DevlinCarnate : June 10, 2013 4:52 pm

i was wondering when you’d get to Tyrone Power’s memorial bench,i heard about it years ago and it always intrigued me,was it a beyond the grave reference to the stifling of his career?…don’t get me wrong,i loved all his swashbuckling roles,but when Nightmare Alley finally came out on video a few years back it was an epiphany,a star kicking back at studios in a movie they didn’t want him to make,and his turn as an aging playboy in Witness For The Prosecution just cemented it for me…he looked like Dorian Gray,debauched,unglamorous,but still with a serpentine charm that kept me guessing until the end

Posted By Doug : June 10, 2013 5:08 pm

Years ago I read a story in one of those “Good Old Days” magazines about Tyrone Power.
A man wrote in about meeting his brother coming back from WWII.
The brother was dark haired and handsome, and it happened that he was on the same transport as Tyrone Power.
A group of Power’s fans saw the brother first and mobbed him, thinking it was Power.
Power held back and, a great grin on his face as he watched the man getting kissed and pummeled.
A few days later the writer of the story went to a movie and saw Tyrone Power sitting there. He introduced himself and told him that that was his brother who had gotten Power’s welcome; they had a good laugh over it, and Power told the guy to thank his brother for him.
Susan, you’re almost there-you might as well write a book about Searching For Old Hollywood. We very much enjoy these posts, and hope that there is more to come.
I appreciate the mention for Nurmi-even though she was never a ‘star’, she made her mark and is part of Hollywood. Even in the grade Z “Plan Nine From Outer Space” she was impressive, and not just for her tiny waist. Her eyes and those fingernails are also part of her iconic look.
I visited my parent’s stone just today-memorials are how we touch the past.

Posted By Doug : June 10, 2013 5:08 pm

Years ago I read a story in one of those “Good Old Days” magazines about Tyrone Power.
A man wrote in about meeting his brother coming back from WWII.
The brother was dark haired and handsome, and it happened that he was on the same transport as Tyrone Power.
A group of Power’s fans saw the brother first and mobbed him, thinking it was Power.
Power held back and, a great grin on his face as he watched the man getting kissed and pummeled.
A few days later the writer of the story went to a movie and saw Tyrone Power sitting there. He introduced himself and told him that that was his brother who had gotten Power’s welcome; they had a good laugh over it, and Power told the guy to thank his brother for him.
Susan, you’re almost there-you might as well write a book about Searching For Old Hollywood. We very much enjoy these posts, and hope that there is more to come.
I appreciate the mention for Nurmi-even though she was never a ‘star’, she made her mark and is part of Hollywood. Even in the grade Z “Plan Nine From Outer Space” she was impressive, and not just for her tiny waist. Her eyes and those fingernails are also part of her iconic look.
I visited my parent’s stone just today-memorials are how we touch the past.

Posted By Anonymous : June 10, 2013 6:11 pm

Let’s hear it for Susan! Another Winner! wow. Thank you for not letting us down, Susan. This one is even better yet!(btw: Years ago at one of those Conventions, I met Maila Nurmi & stood in line to get an autographed photo. Just as she was about to sign a VAMPIRA pic, I spotted a bizarre MAILA portrait I’ve never seen [before or since]. “Wait!”, I bleated. She paused, pen in mid air, eyebrow raised, and said “You want THAT one?” “Oh yes, please, fer sure fer sure!” She delighted in presenting it to me and it is now in a Deco frame, in a SpecialPlace…) (Don’t get me started on ELVIRA…) ANYWAYZ: moreMOREmore! You should compile these unique articles into a book. I think I just appointed myself to President of your FanClub…luvAL

Posted By Anonymous : June 10, 2013 6:11 pm

Let’s hear it for Susan! Another Winner! wow. Thank you for not letting us down, Susan. This one is even better yet!(btw: Years ago at one of those Conventions, I met Maila Nurmi & stood in line to get an autographed photo. Just as she was about to sign a VAMPIRA pic, I spotted a bizarre MAILA portrait I’ve never seen [before or since]. “Wait!”, I bleated. She paused, pen in mid air, eyebrow raised, and said “You want THAT one?” “Oh yes, please, fer sure fer sure!” She delighted in presenting it to me and it is now in a Deco frame, in a SpecialPlace…) (Don’t get me started on ELVIRA…) ANYWAYZ: moreMOREmore! You should compile these unique articles into a book. I think I just appointed myself to President of your FanClub…luvAL

Posted By poorarchivist : June 10, 2013 6:39 pm

Reblogged this on The Cheap CinemaFile and commented:
This is fascinating and well written. I hope to visit the Hollywood Forever Cemetery someday!

Posted By poorarchivist : June 10, 2013 6:39 pm

Reblogged this on The Cheap CinemaFile and commented:
This is fascinating and well written. I hope to visit the Hollywood Forever Cemetery someday!

Posted By Susan Doll : June 11, 2013 7:48 pm

Doug: I like your comment about “memorials are how we touch the past.” So true, and well said. Thanks for reading.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 11, 2013 7:48 pm

Doug: I like your comment about “memorials are how we touch the past.” So true, and well said. Thanks for reading.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 11, 2013 7:49 pm

Thanks everyone for reading the whole series–that’s a lot of words! I appreciate your loyalty.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 11, 2013 7:49 pm

Thanks everyone for reading the whole series–that’s a lot of words! I appreciate your loyalty.

Posted By Melissa : June 12, 2013 4:04 pm

Being a huge fan of Tyrone Power and Hollywood Cemetery)since I was in my early teens, I so appreciate this article. Well done! Not to nitpick, but the photo of Spencer Tracy and James Stewart was taken at the funeral of Clark Gable.

Posted By Melissa : June 12, 2013 4:04 pm

Being a huge fan of Tyrone Power and Hollywood Cemetery)since I was in my early teens, I so appreciate this article. Well done! Not to nitpick, but the photo of Spencer Tracy and James Stewart was taken at the funeral of Clark Gable.

Posted By Andy : June 13, 2013 9:14 pm

BRAVO!

Fine job Susan. Most entertaining & enlightening journey of Hollywood early days & celebrities who entertained so many people. Your look at several lesser known personalities was great. Too often we see & remember only stars & fail to recognize & acknowledge contributions from others who were valuable to entertaining us.

Also, aren’t you & colleagues to appear on TCM? Details please.

Andy

Posted By Andy : June 13, 2013 9:14 pm

BRAVO!

Fine job Susan. Most entertaining & enlightening journey of Hollywood early days & celebrities who entertained so many people. Your look at several lesser known personalities was great. Too often we see & remember only stars & fail to recognize & acknowledge contributions from others who were valuable to entertaining us.

Also, aren’t you & colleagues to appear on TCM? Details please.

Andy

Posted By Susan Doll : June 13, 2013 10:56 pm

Thanks Andy for kind words about the blog post.

Four of us Morlocks have already appeared on TCM last November. Perhaps they have asked other Morlocks to appear this year, but I have heard nothing to that effect.

It was great fun to be on TCM. One of my best memories.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 13, 2013 10:56 pm

Thanks Andy for kind words about the blog post.

Four of us Morlocks have already appeared on TCM last November. Perhaps they have asked other Morlocks to appear this year, but I have heard nothing to that effect.

It was great fun to be on TCM. One of my best memories.

Posted By robbushblog : June 21, 2013 2:27 pm

Thanks again for these posts. I have enjoyed them greatly.

Posted By robbushblog : June 21, 2013 2:27 pm

Thanks again for these posts. I have enjoyed them greatly.

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