The Peter Cushing nobody knows

Cushing portrait

I don’t mean that literally, of course… it just feels that way sometimes, that there is a whole other side to Peter Cushing that no one ever talks about. Fans of the late and greatly missed actor are as one in their belief that the man was a consummate performer but it saddens me how few of that number will follow him into a non-horror film. Getting the jump on Pierre Fournier’s Peter Cushing Centennial Blog-a-thon by one day, I’ll be taking a look at just a scattering of the man’s non-genre roles, made before and during his tenure as one of the Kings of Hammer Horror.

Vigil in the NightEarly in his career, Cushing tried his luck in America and fortune favored him with some small success. He made his feature film debut in James Whale’s THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK (1939), where he was given a small role (and a dueling scene with Warren William) and used as star Louis Heyward’s double. Cast in a dual role, Heyward relied on Cushing to play his onscreen twin, with the studio compositing Heyward’s scenes into the same frame (and Cushing winding up on the cutting room floor). The opportunity not only allowed Cushing his first studio gig but allowed the fledgling film actor to make a study of his work via “dailies” and make adjustments. Cushing appeared in a handful of films in Hollywood, among them A CHUMP AT OXFORD (1940) with Laurel and Hardy (in which he also doubled for Stan Laurel in one long shot) and VIGIL IN THE NIGHT (1940), opposite Carole Lombard. It was in VIGIL that Cushing got to play an actual character for the first time, and enjoy considerably higher billing. Twenty-seven years old at the time, he was cast as the boyfriend of clinic nurse Carole Lombard, whose sister (Ann Shirley), a nurse-in-training, causes the death of a young boy. Taking the fall for her sister, Lombard exiles herself to a tumbledown city hospital, where she falls under the purview of doctor Brian Aherne and a budding romance blossoms. Meanwhile, kid sister Shirley marries Cushing but another scandal (in which she is an entirely innocent party) complicates the plot, pointing the film toward a poignant but tragic finish (punctuated, if only in the British release print, with news of England’s entry into World War II). Cushing has only three scenes but he gets the most out of them, playing his character’s lack of sophistication and vulnerability in a world largely governed by chance. This is streets away from the certainty of his later, career-defining characterization of vampire slayer Abraham Van Helsing and more in line with what is to my mind his best film performance. But more about that later.

Time Without PityIn Joseph Losey’s TIME WITHOUT PITY (1957), Cushing plays another supporting character — the lawyer retained to defend alcoholic writer Michael Redgrave’s son (Alec McCowen) against the charge of murder. You know almost immediately that Cushing’s natty little solicitor is going to be useless in the cause and that Redgrave, dead man walking that he is, will have to save the day single handed. It’s a thankless role but Cushing gives it his all, nearly convincing you at first that his ethics and professionalism might just be what the doctor ordered… until things go against the protagonists and he has to give that impotent, disappointed look that movie lawyers so often get before their clients are forced to take charge. This was Cushing’s last straight role before CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1957) changed the game — and his game — forever. Though his character can hardly be called dynamic, Cushing particularizes the man brilliantly (as ever) as an expertly tailored suit of clothes (plus a bowler and Harold Lloyd spectacles) in search of a heartbeat.

End of the AffairMade a couple of years before TIME WITHOUT PITY, Edward Dmytryk’s THE END OF THE AFFAIR (1955) is the first film adaptation of the Grahame Green novel about an American writer in London after World War II who enters into an affair with the unstable wife of a civil servant. Van Johnson and Deborah Kerr play the lovers and Cushing the cuckold in the cutaway coat — an inherently decent and scrupulous man who has no idea what to do with a wife. When I was a kid I’d see this film listed among Peter Cushing’s credits and groan — Ugh, a movie about kissing, where nobody makes anybody out of dead bodies or drives a stake of fire-hardened ashwood into anybody’s sternum. And boy was I wrong. I now believe END OF THE AFFAIR to be the jewel in Cushing’s cinematic crown. He is magnificent at playing this lovely, clueless, weak man. In a standard love triangle, the part would have been a throwaway and Deborah Kerr’s preference for Van Johnson a no-brainer. Thankfully, Greene’s script is more than just about sex or passion and Cushing is allowed to imbue his character with some gorgeous shadings, which make you want to hug him and bash his dense head against the wall all at once.

Violent PlaygroundCushing received second billing for the Rank Organization’s VIOLENT PLAYGROUND (1958), though this likely had everything to do with seniority. (Though credited just below star Stanley Baker in the s opening credits and on posters, he is fourth-billed in the closing titles, behind younger costars Anne Heyward and David McCallum.) Again, Cushing has only a couple of scenes but great rapport with Baker, as (respectively) a Roman Catholic priest and a Liverpool copper working in common cause to turn local youths away from crime. Not surprising for a Basil Dearden, there is a strong sense of social conscience running through VIOLENT PLAYGROUND, which culminates in a hostage scenario, as McCallum’s wayward youth (who has turned to arson and accidentally killed another boy while in flight from the authorities) barricades himself inside an elementary school, where he holds a classroom full of 8 and 10 year-olds captive shouting contumely at the Liverpool PD. Post-Sandy Hook, this setpiece packs a surprisingly potent punch and Dearden does not shy away entirely from realizing the grim possibilities. It’s a great role for Baker, forcing him to dial back the machismo and use his head (as well as his heart) and Cushing works with him in perfect counterpart, etching an uncommonly practical and (for films) useful cleric. Cushing’s last bit with Baker almost begs for a TV spin-off that sadly never came.

Cone of SilenceA fictionalized account of the fatal 1954 crash of a DeHavilland Comet passenger jet in the Mediterranean Ocean, CONE OF SILENCE (1960) was made in the wake of Cushing’s career definition via Hammer Studios. By this point he had already made CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1957), DRACULA (US: HORROR OF DRACULA, 1957), REVENGE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1959) and THE MUMMY (1959) with THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960) the next serving on his horror plate. Though he plays another supporting role, albeit with quite a few scenes to his credit, Cushing’s rising stock within the British film industry dictated billing above Bernard Lee (poised to assume the mantle of “M” in the James Bond series), around whom the film revolves. Released in the United States as TROUBLE IN THE SKY, the film attends a series of investigations into the character of  one Captain Gort (Lee), a commercial pilot, following an accident that left his copilot dead. Permitted to resume flying (despite the reservations of various colleagues), Gort struggles to shake off the shroud of shame the the world wants to drape around his rounded shoulders. Michael Craig stars as a training pilot whose job of assessing Gort’s capabilities are compromised by his love for the man’s daughter (Elizabeth Seal, whose next feature film was VAMPIRE CIRCUS, a decade later) and elsewhere CONE OF SILENCE benefits from the crisp performances of a number of familiar British and Australian character actors: André Morrell (Watson to Cushing’s Sherlock Holmes in THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES), Jack Hedley (THE ANNIVERSARY), Charles Tingwell (DRACULA, PRINCE OF DARKNESS), Noel Willman (KISS OF THE VAMPIRE), Marne Maitland (THE REPTILE), Gordon Jackson (UPSTAIRS, DOWNSTAIRS), and George Sanders (in a wry cameo as a smarmy legal counsel). It’s Cushing who has the most interesting character to play, though, as his motivations are the hardest to pin down. The power of CONE OF SILENCE is that it doesn’t scapegoat anyone, however great their culpability may be. The film builds to a tragic finish, with Cushing’s starchy martinet humbled by the very human error he sought to expose in another. Imagine a Dracula film in which Van Helsing comes to realize he is wrong.

Cash on Demand02Quentin Lawrence’s CASH ON DEMAND (1962) gets a little more love from Cushing fans because it is a Hammer film  (albeit non-horror) and readily available on DVD here in the States. Nonetheless, it is sorely underestimated as a top-tier Cushing title and that inequity needs to be corrected post haste. Essentially a coy reworking of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, the film presents PC as a niggling provincial bank manager who lords over his employees like a jailhouse screw, terrorizing them with niggling details (he is a compulsive smudge and dust checker) and holding over their bowed heads the threat of termination. Cushing’s need to be in control at all times is tested one December 23rd when gentleman bank robber André Morell slides into his back office in the guise of an insurance company inspector. Charming the wage slaves with a lot of squire-like bonhomie, Morell reveals another side entirely when alone with Cushing, informing him that his wife and son are being held hostage against the completion of a successful robbery. Morell is at the top of his game here, by turns avuncular and merciless (his reading of the line “Just some money” is absolutely brilliant — there should be a BAFTA category for Best Performance by a Pair of Lips), but the show is watching Cushing being taken down several pegs, systematically, from self-perceived demigod to decent human being. If the framing device seems a bit pat, let me tell you that the execution is flawless throughout. You’d scarcely remember after the final fade-out that CASH ON DEMAND is essentially a two-man show, with a single setting, so great is the tension and so cracking is the chemistry between Cushing and Morell that you never know, even thirty seconds before the end title crawl, how this thing is going to play out.

Peter Cushing

Peter Cushing left Hollywood before he could become a name in America, so great was his love for his homeland that he could not wait to return to it, despite having to cross Nazi-targeted shipping lanes in order to get there. He spent the next decade in theatre before returning to film in HAMLET (1948), opposite Laurence Olivier (and a young actor named Christopher Lee) but it was in British television that Cushing made his early fame. Hammer brought Cushing back to the big screen in a major way, albeit ghettoized in genre. One might feel sorry for Cushing for losing out on more choice dramatic roles… but look what happened to most of the big Hollywood stars he supported. By the 1970s, with Cushing still going strong as Hammer’s elder statesman, Louis Heyward, Ida Lupino, George Sanders, and even Van Johnson were doing cheap thrillers, programmers, and even horror movies. Sure, he would have been amazing in, say, the Alec Guiness role in BRIDGE OVER THE RIVER KWAI (1957) or as Kim Stanley’s weak-willed husband in SEANCE ON A WET AFTERNOON (1964) or as Merlyn in CAMELOT (1967) but he did all right, didn’t he? Happy Birthday, Peter Cushing! We’ll still be watching your films 100 years from now.

50 Responses The Peter Cushing nobody knows
Posted By DevlinCarnate : May 24, 2013 3:15 pm

although a lot of the Hammer films were made on the cheap,i hardly consider them low budget cheapies…i think that Cushing got the best of the deal over Lee,who although he did make some films outside the genre,will always be linked to Dracula…Peter Cushing by all accounts was a decent man,and a loving husband that doted on his ailing wife,and though he is best known for his roles as a mad scientist or vampire hunter,he gave it his all..convincingly….there’s always “woulda,coulda,shoulda” moments for everyone,but the fact we’re here talking about him is the greatest compliment and accolade he could get…

Posted By DevlinCarnate : May 24, 2013 3:15 pm

although a lot of the Hammer films were made on the cheap,i hardly consider them low budget cheapies…i think that Cushing got the best of the deal over Lee,who although he did make some films outside the genre,will always be linked to Dracula…Peter Cushing by all accounts was a decent man,and a loving husband that doted on his ailing wife,and though he is best known for his roles as a mad scientist or vampire hunter,he gave it his all..convincingly….there’s always “woulda,coulda,shoulda” moments for everyone,but the fact we’re here talking about him is the greatest compliment and accolade he could get…

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : May 24, 2013 3:18 pm

…the fact we’re here talking about him is the greatest compliment and accolade he could get…

No argument there!

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : May 24, 2013 3:18 pm

…the fact we’re here talking about him is the greatest compliment and accolade he could get…

No argument there!

Posted By AL : May 24, 2013 5:23 pm

likeability quotient 100%

Posted By AL : May 24, 2013 5:23 pm

likeability quotient 100%

Posted By Emgee : May 24, 2013 5:28 pm

As a kid seeing my first Dracula movie Cushing almost creeped me out as much as the caped Count. Those piercing eyes, that sharp jawline, the thin-lipped mouth….
Never seen him in a non-Hammer movie, but i’m sure he’s excellent in all of them. He was always an infinitely better actor than most of his Hammer co-stars.
BTW who’s that sharing a grave with him? Some Hammer bigwig probably?

Posted By Emgee : May 24, 2013 5:28 pm

As a kid seeing my first Dracula movie Cushing almost creeped me out as much as the caped Count. Those piercing eyes, that sharp jawline, the thin-lipped mouth….
Never seen him in a non-Hammer movie, but i’m sure he’s excellent in all of them. He was always an infinitely better actor than most of his Hammer co-stars.
BTW who’s that sharing a grave with him? Some Hammer bigwig probably?

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : May 24, 2013 5:32 pm

That’s Hammer in-house producer Anthony Nelson Keys.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : May 24, 2013 5:32 pm

That’s Hammer in-house producer Anthony Nelson Keys.

Posted By Doug : May 24, 2013 5:56 pm

Emgee, though it wasn’t ‘his’ movie, Cushing set the “Empire” tone perfectly as Grand Moff Tarkin in Star Wars.
Doubling for Stan Laurel in “A Chump At Oxford”? I had no idea that Cushing’s career went back so far, or that he had come to Hollywood so early.
This is part of the charm of Morlocks-learning more,discovering more about artists and movies that enrich our film education and passion. Happy birthday indeed to Mr Cushing.

Posted By Doug : May 24, 2013 5:56 pm

Emgee, though it wasn’t ‘his’ movie, Cushing set the “Empire” tone perfectly as Grand Moff Tarkin in Star Wars.
Doubling for Stan Laurel in “A Chump At Oxford”? I had no idea that Cushing’s career went back so far, or that he had come to Hollywood so early.
This is part of the charm of Morlocks-learning more,discovering more about artists and movies that enrich our film education and passion. Happy birthday indeed to Mr Cushing.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : May 24, 2013 6:04 pm

Cushing sailed for New York on the SS Champlain on January 18, 1939, bound for New York. He billeted in the Big Apple long enough to obtain a letter of introduction to producer Edward Small and to meet Robert Morley, then playing Oscar Wilde on Broadway. Cushing asked Morley what his chances might be in Hollywood, to which the elder actor replied “It’s very crowded, you know, dear boy. Why don’t you just go there for a holiday? Have you brought your bathing costume with you?”

Cushing took a train cross country and arrived in LA on February 10th. He walked the 4 miles from downtown to Hollywood in a soaking rain (wearing a tweed suit, no less). He had $16 and a cheap wristwatch that he used for collateral to get a room at the Y. On his first visit to Edward Small Productions, he was given a job as Louis Heyward’s double in The Man in the Iron Mask, at $75 a week. By the end of shooting, he was Heyward and wife Ida Lupino’s favorite house guest, and playing cricket with C. Aubrey Smith and Boris Karloff.

When the film finished shooting, he was having a milkshake at Schwab’s Drug Store when he heard Hal Roach was looking for British actors to be extras in A Chump at Oxford. Once again, the job was his for the asking. His luck wasn’t always this good but it was not a bad start!

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : May 24, 2013 6:04 pm

Cushing sailed for New York on the SS Champlain on January 18, 1939, bound for New York. He billeted in the Big Apple long enough to obtain a letter of introduction to producer Edward Small and to meet Robert Morley, then playing Oscar Wilde on Broadway. Cushing asked Morley what his chances might be in Hollywood, to which the elder actor replied “It’s very crowded, you know, dear boy. Why don’t you just go there for a holiday? Have you brought your bathing costume with you?”

Cushing took a train cross country and arrived in LA on February 10th. He walked the 4 miles from downtown to Hollywood in a soaking rain (wearing a tweed suit, no less). He had $16 and a cheap wristwatch that he used for collateral to get a room at the Y. On his first visit to Edward Small Productions, he was given a job as Louis Heyward’s double in The Man in the Iron Mask, at $75 a week. By the end of shooting, he was Heyward and wife Ida Lupino’s favorite house guest, and playing cricket with C. Aubrey Smith and Boris Karloff.

When the film finished shooting, he was having a milkshake at Schwab’s Drug Store when he heard Hal Roach was looking for British actors to be extras in A Chump at Oxford. Once again, the job was his for the asking. His luck wasn’t always this good but it was not a bad start!

Posted By swac44 : May 24, 2013 6:40 pm

It’s a heck of a chore tracking down James Whale’s non-horror titles (thanks TCM for showing Show Boat, among others), and I’ve never been able to see his Man in the Iron Mask. Is it available anywhere? I’d love to see Cushing dueling with William.

Like many others of my age, I first encounted Cushing during the original release of Star Wars, although I suspect I may have seen his episodes of Space 1999 and The New Avengers before that, although eventually I’d get to see him in his Hammer glory in Dracula and The Gorgon on VHS. There are still many key Hammer films of his I haven’t seen, although at the top of my want list is the bonkers 1968 thriller Corruption, loosely based (ripped off from?) Les Yeux Sans Visage. I’m sure it’ll turn up one of these days.

Posted By swac44 : May 24, 2013 6:40 pm

It’s a heck of a chore tracking down James Whale’s non-horror titles (thanks TCM for showing Show Boat, among others), and I’ve never been able to see his Man in the Iron Mask. Is it available anywhere? I’d love to see Cushing dueling with William.

Like many others of my age, I first encounted Cushing during the original release of Star Wars, although I suspect I may have seen his episodes of Space 1999 and The New Avengers before that, although eventually I’d get to see him in his Hammer glory in Dracula and The Gorgon on VHS. There are still many key Hammer films of his I haven’t seen, although at the top of my want list is the bonkers 1968 thriller Corruption, loosely based (ripped off from?) Les Yeux Sans Visage. I’m sure it’ll turn up one of these days.

Posted By B Piper : May 24, 2013 8:48 pm

As a teenager I watched END OF THE AFFAIR only because Cushing was in it, although I knew it wasn’t a horror film, and was greatly moved by his performance. I thought Cushing’s best moment was the wordless look he shoots Van Johnson after (I believe) Kerr’s death. One shouldn’t regret his type-casting in horror. I doubt he did.

Posted By B Piper : May 24, 2013 8:48 pm

As a teenager I watched END OF THE AFFAIR only because Cushing was in it, although I knew it wasn’t a horror film, and was greatly moved by his performance. I thought Cushing’s best moment was the wordless look he shoots Van Johnson after (I believe) Kerr’s death. One shouldn’t regret his type-casting in horror. I doubt he did.

Posted By jennifromrollamo : May 25, 2013 12:13 am

Swac-TCM showed Whale’s Man in the Iron Mask last year because I watched it. Look to see if they’ll be re-airing it. I liked Cushing in a movie that co-starred Forest Tucker, The Abominable Snowman, made in 1957. Those two acted well together and took what could have been a dumb plot and made it believable and tense portraying two scientists in the Himalayas whose group is attacked by the monster. I was checking out IMDb on Peter Cushing and he played Mr. Darcy for a British television production of Pride and Prejudice in the 1950s! I’d love to see his take on Mr. Darcy!!

Posted By jennifromrollamo : May 25, 2013 12:13 am

Swac-TCM showed Whale’s Man in the Iron Mask last year because I watched it. Look to see if they’ll be re-airing it. I liked Cushing in a movie that co-starred Forest Tucker, The Abominable Snowman, made in 1957. Those two acted well together and took what could have been a dumb plot and made it believable and tense portraying two scientists in the Himalayas whose group is attacked by the monster. I was checking out IMDb on Peter Cushing and he played Mr. Darcy for a British television production of Pride and Prejudice in the 1950s! I’d love to see his take on Mr. Darcy!!

Posted By Emgee : May 25, 2013 5:14 am

Peter Cushing as Mr. Darcy…..Now there’s a shocker!
“Pray, tell, Mr. Darcy, why the garlic and the crucifix?”

Posted By Emgee : May 25, 2013 5:14 am

Peter Cushing as Mr. Darcy…..Now there’s a shocker!
“Pray, tell, Mr. Darcy, why the garlic and the crucifix?”

Posted By Gene : May 25, 2013 10:52 am

Always loved Peter Cushing as a kid. I saw End of The Affair a couple of years ago. I thought it was magnificent and wasn’t surprised by Cushing’s performance in the least but was surprised that he was cast in the role. Terribly underrated and deserving of more than just being remembered for his Hammer roles. Great writeup!

Posted By Gene : May 25, 2013 10:52 am

Always loved Peter Cushing as a kid. I saw End of The Affair a couple of years ago. I thought it was magnificent and wasn’t surprised by Cushing’s performance in the least but was surprised that he was cast in the role. Terribly underrated and deserving of more than just being remembered for his Hammer roles. Great writeup!

Posted By Joe Thompson : May 25, 2013 11:27 am

Thank you for an excellent kickoff to the blogathon. Peter Cushing was worth watching in everything he did. I knew he was in Chump at Oxford, but I did not know he doubled Stan Laurel, even in one shot. “Imagine a Dracula film in which Van Helsing comes to realize he is wrong” — What a wonderful thought.

Posted By Joe Thompson : May 25, 2013 11:27 am

Thank you for an excellent kickoff to the blogathon. Peter Cushing was worth watching in everything he did. I knew he was in Chump at Oxford, but I did not know he doubled Stan Laurel, even in one shot. “Imagine a Dracula film in which Van Helsing comes to realize he is wrong” — What a wonderful thought.

Posted By Anonymous : May 25, 2013 11:39 am

Here’s a link to an obituary for actress Daphne Slater, who played Elizabeth Bennett to Cushing’s dashing Mr. Darcy, which includes a photo of the two in costume (circa 1952):

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/daphne-slater-she-played-the-first-television-jane-eyre-8262174.html

Posted By Anonymous : May 25, 2013 11:39 am

Here’s a link to an obituary for actress Daphne Slater, who played Elizabeth Bennett to Cushing’s dashing Mr. Darcy, which includes a photo of the two in costume (circa 1952):

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/daphne-slater-she-played-the-first-television-jane-eyre-8262174.html

Posted By jennifromrollamo : May 25, 2013 11:50 am

Oh thanks for that link to the picture of Cushing as Mr. Darcy! Now I want to try and find this and hoping someone put it on dvd. The late actress, Daphne Slater, it said in the linked article, also played Jane Eyre to Stanley Baker’s Mr. Rochester. I am familiar with Baker in Zulu! so to see him as Mr. R. would also be very interesting.

Posted By jennifromrollamo : May 25, 2013 11:50 am

Oh thanks for that link to the picture of Cushing as Mr. Darcy! Now I want to try and find this and hoping someone put it on dvd. The late actress, Daphne Slater, it said in the linked article, also played Jane Eyre to Stanley Baker’s Mr. Rochester. I am familiar with Baker in Zulu! so to see him as Mr. R. would also be very interesting.

Posted By DevlinCarnate : May 25, 2013 1:15 pm

swac44…Corruption has shown up On TCM Underground …hopefully they show it again,i konked out 15 minutes into it

Posted By DevlinCarnate : May 25, 2013 1:15 pm

swac44…Corruption has shown up On TCM Underground …hopefully they show it again,i konked out 15 minutes into it

Posted By Dan Day, Jr. : May 25, 2013 4:44 pm

Great article on my favorite actor of all time. And it brings up the question: Was Cushing really “wasted” in all those horror/science fiction roles? If Cushing had played more “normal” parts, would he still have had the same intense fan interest?

Posted By Dan Day, Jr. : May 25, 2013 4:44 pm

Great article on my favorite actor of all time. And it brings up the question: Was Cushing really “wasted” in all those horror/science fiction roles? If Cushing had played more “normal” parts, would he still have had the same intense fan interest?

Posted By Craig Edwards : May 25, 2013 9:02 pm

Excellent post!

Posted By Craig Edwards : May 25, 2013 9:02 pm

Excellent post!

Posted By Mistlake : May 26, 2013 4:41 am

Thanks for this article! For years I have been ranting about how people should watch Cushing’s non-horror films, since there are so many gems there, and since they give such an impressive account of his range. I think Cash on Demand and The End of the Affair are the finest examples.

In an ideal world, more of his 1950′s TV work would be preserved, and he would still have made all his good horror movies, but the bad ones would be replaced by a good, varied range of drama and comedy parts :)

Posted By Mistlake : May 26, 2013 4:41 am

Thanks for this article! For years I have been ranting about how people should watch Cushing’s non-horror films, since there are so many gems there, and since they give such an impressive account of his range. I think Cash on Demand and The End of the Affair are the finest examples.

In an ideal world, more of his 1950′s TV work would be preserved, and he would still have made all his good horror movies, but the bad ones would be replaced by a good, varied range of drama and comedy parts :)

Posted By Liam Casey : May 26, 2013 6:58 pm

It appears that TCM is showing “The Black Night”, one of Mr. Cushing’s non-horror movies, on the 27th of next month:

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/27873/Black-Knight-The/

Posted By Liam Casey : May 26, 2013 6:58 pm

It appears that TCM is showing “The Black Night”, one of Mr. Cushing’s non-horror movies, on the 27th of next month:

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/27873/Black-Knight-The/

Posted By Juana Maria : May 27, 2013 4:22 pm

I know for a fact that Christopher Lee and Vincent Price were good friends of Peter Cushing. They had birthdays all around the same time! A day or two apart that’s all at the end of May. I personally enjoy his films, though it is hard for me not to think of him as either Sherlock Holmes or in some monster movie! True. “The Flesh and the Fiends” is one I think needs more discussing. It was discussed somewhat when awhile back there was the Burke and Hare article. I would like to mention a few of his films I’ve seen:”The House That Dripped Blood”;”…Now the Screaming Starts”;and of course the “Frankenstein” and “Dracula” stuff; “Star Wars”, and he was even the legendary Dr. Who. That’s big stuff to my Dad and big brother. Thanks for the article. I too admire this wonderful actor!

Posted By Juana Maria : May 27, 2013 4:22 pm

I know for a fact that Christopher Lee and Vincent Price were good friends of Peter Cushing. They had birthdays all around the same time! A day or two apart that’s all at the end of May. I personally enjoy his films, though it is hard for me not to think of him as either Sherlock Holmes or in some monster movie! True. “The Flesh and the Fiends” is one I think needs more discussing. It was discussed somewhat when awhile back there was the Burke and Hare article. I would like to mention a few of his films I’ve seen:”The House That Dripped Blood”;”…Now the Screaming Starts”;and of course the “Frankenstein” and “Dracula” stuff; “Star Wars”, and he was even the legendary Dr. Who. That’s big stuff to my Dad and big brother. Thanks for the article. I too admire this wonderful actor!

Posted By DBenson : May 28, 2013 4:03 am

Swac: James Whale’s “Man in the Iron Mask”, along with the Robert Donat “Count of Monte Cristo” and the Fairbanks Jr. “Corsican Brothers” (different directors, same producer), finally came out as decent, legal DVDs. The first two are mandatory swashbucklers; the third comes pretty close.

Posted By DBenson : May 28, 2013 4:03 am

Swac: James Whale’s “Man in the Iron Mask”, along with the Robert Donat “Count of Monte Cristo” and the Fairbanks Jr. “Corsican Brothers” (different directors, same producer), finally came out as decent, legal DVDs. The first two are mandatory swashbucklers; the third comes pretty close.

Posted By swac44 : May 28, 2013 7:04 am

Ah, so it did, from Hen’s Tooth Video. Which probably explains why I haven’t come across it in regular retail outlets (or in Canada). Definitely worth $15 at any rate.

http://www.amazon.com/Man-Iron-Mask-Louis-Hayward/dp/B0068Y4NBY/ref=sr_1_5?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1369738939&sr=1-5&keywords=man+in+the+iron+mask

Posted By swac44 : May 28, 2013 7:04 am

Ah, so it did, from Hen’s Tooth Video. Which probably explains why I haven’t come across it in regular retail outlets (or in Canada). Definitely worth $15 at any rate.

http://www.amazon.com/Man-Iron-Mask-Louis-Hayward/dp/B0068Y4NBY/ref=sr_1_5?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1369738939&sr=1-5&keywords=man+in+the+iron+mask

Posted By Patricia Nolan-Hall : May 29, 2013 3:18 pm

Thorough and fascinating article which has greatly increased my must-see list.

Posted By Patricia Nolan-Hall : May 29, 2013 3:18 pm

Thorough and fascinating article which has greatly increased my must-see list.

Posted By Commander Adams : June 4, 2013 8:28 pm

Comic book artist Bob Layton based the original look of Iron Man villain Justin Hammer on Cushing. He would have been a lot more interesting in the role than Sam Rockwell.

Posted By Commander Adams : June 4, 2013 8:28 pm

Comic book artist Bob Layton based the original look of Iron Man villain Justin Hammer on Cushing. He would have been a lot more interesting in the role than Sam Rockwell.

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