Better Than The Movie That’s Better

I’m not even sure I understand what I’m about to ask but here goes:  Have you ever watched a movie that was better than another movie but you thought the movie that’s not as good as the better movie is better than the one that’s better?

Huh?

To wit:  I think goodfellas is a better gangster movie than The Godfather.  I think The Godfather is a better movie than goodfellas.  Except, as a gangster movie, I think goodfellas is better.  But if I think goodfellas is better as a gangster movie, and I further consider The Godfather a gangster movie, how come I think The Godfather is a better movie?  Damned if I know.

Lovers' Tiff

Ever happen to you?  Happens to me all the time.  It’s the age old conundrum of “this movie is an exemplar of its genre but I think this one is a better movie while not being as good a genre movie.”  Amount of sense made: Zero.  Except that it does make sense, kind of, and either way I would like to understand it just a little bit more.

Take westerns.  I am of the mind that, as obvious and non-controversial as this is, The Searchers really is the best western ever made.  But, and this is strange, I think Stagecoach is better.   I think Stagecoach is so absolutely prototypical in defining the western as mythmaking Cowboys vs. Indians conflict, and truly bursting John Wayne, wasted for years up to that point, onto the scene with that shot, that amazing shot and then taking us on a wild chase with stuntmen crawling under a team of horses on a blazing stagecoach while other stuntmen fall from horses as one side shoots the other and… well, it’s just so damned exhilarating!

But I think The Searchers is better.

As a movie.

Except that Stagecoach is better as a western.

But The Searchers is a western and it’s a better movie.

I think.

Okay, forget genre comparisons.  Let’s go recklessly headlong into the canon.  I think Citizen Kane is one of the best films ever produced.  I really do.  I think it’s better than The Magnificent Ambersons but… well, you know what’s coming.  I think The Magnificent Ambersons is better and this isn’t some weird semantic game where better means more enjoyable or I’m saying I think one is better but the other is more fun.  No, I honestly believe Ambersons is the better movie and it bothers me that it gets left off that blasted Sight and Sound poll because it’s an extraordinary piece of work.  And yet, I understand and kind of agree that Citizen Kane is the better movie.  Which contradicts what I just wrote.  So let’s figure this thing out.

Two women demonstrating the incorrect wa

I think a lot of this comes down to what came first.  Stagecoach laid out the blueprint for the western and The Searchers perfected it.  The Godfather took the gangster movie to a deeper, richer level and goodfellas removed the romanticism.  Citizen Kane showed the wonders that Welles could perform and Ambersons made it more personal.

But that doesn’t explain all of it.  It doesn’t explain why I still think, on any given day, that the best film of 1941 was The Maltese Falcon.  Citizen Kane had more showmanship relish but Falcon created something deeper, something that led to the noirs I love and that places it even higher.  At the same time, if backed up to a wall, I’d probably say Kane is better but I don’t know if I absolutely believe that.

Or how about movies that display little trace of studio professionalism or adept ability at the art of financing but still somehow work better than the other movie that is clearly better or at least more highly budgeted?  Psycho clearly has a higher quality sheen to it than Night of the Living Dead but that doesn’t mean it’s better.  Except, I do think it’s the better movie and if I had to rank the top 1,000 Greatest Movies of All Time, I’m pretty sure Psycho would make my top 100 while Night of the Living Dead would be on the list but further down.  Except that, of course, Night of the Living Dead is such an absolutely primordial horror movie, not only unleashing (albeit, after years and years of nothing) an entire subgenre (as did Psycho, of course, with the slasher movie) but doing it in such a grainy, gritty, low-budget way as to make Psycho look like a David Lean epic which somehow makes it the better horror movie.  But I still think Psycho‘s the better movie.

Let’s return to a single director’s work again, like we did with Orson Welles a moment ago.  Jacques Tati  is one of my favorite people in movie history.  If nothing else, I admire him for going so strongly in his own direction and perfecting the art of the silent film long after sound became the norm.  What’s more, he did it all with sound and without intertitles.  When people list the great silent filmmakers and leave Tati off the list, it’s enough to drive a man crazy.  But of his very few works, the two that stand out for me are Mon Oncle (1958) and Playtime (1967).    I have always enjoyed Mon Oncle more and feel it’s gentle interplay between the modern suburbs and decaying central city tenements is more firmly on target than the over-reaching Playtime.  But that over-reaching is exactly what I think makes Playtime so extraordinary.  It’s so colossal in size and scope that it’s overwhelming to behold.  That one man realized such a vision on the screen stuns me into a jaw-hanging silence.  But if someone asked me what his best film was, I’d have to look that person straight in the eye and say, “I think Mon Oncle is his best movie but Playtime is probably better.”  And then I’d have to assure them I didn’t mean I think one is better and the other is more enjoyable.  No, I meant both are the best.  Mon Oncle is better than Playtime but Playtime is better than Mon Oncle.

Couple sitting on sofa

Personally, once you accept that nothing is the best ever and one film is better than another only for as long as it is lesser than the other movie which is better, it’s not confusing at all.  It’s just another way of saying the movies are a living art and their existence is never static so long as the human mind has the ability to think two opposite things at the same time.  Which is why 2001: A Space Odyssey is better than Blade Runner.

Except that Blade Runner is better.

56 Responses Better Than The Movie That’s Better
Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 10:20 am

Greg, interesting train of thought! I see what you are getting at, but don’t ask me to explain it. I can’t put it into words, but maybe I can give a few examples.

To Have And Have Not was better than the big budget film it was based on, Casablanca. Hombre held my attention better than the iconic movie that spawned it, Stagecoach. The Italian movie, Mafioso, was far better than the landmark film it inspired, Godfather II.

The shot on a shoestring, Galaxy of Terror, was, for me, better than the film, Alien, which inspired it. (And it was also better than Aliens, which was, believe it or not, inspired by Galaxy of Terror!) Now how do I “unconvolute” myself?

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 10:20 am

Greg, interesting train of thought! I see what you are getting at, but don’t ask me to explain it. I can’t put it into words, but maybe I can give a few examples.

To Have And Have Not was better than the big budget film it was based on, Casablanca. Hombre held my attention better than the iconic movie that spawned it, Stagecoach. The Italian movie, Mafioso, was far better than the landmark film it inspired, Godfather II.

The shot on a shoestring, Galaxy of Terror, was, for me, better than the film, Alien, which inspired it. (And it was also better than Aliens, which was, believe it or not, inspired by Galaxy of Terror!) Now how do I “unconvolute” myself?

Posted By Pamela : April 10, 2013 10:36 am

This totally makes sense to me. and I totally know what you mean. Great post!

Posted By Pamela : April 10, 2013 10:36 am

This totally makes sense to me. and I totally know what you mean. Great post!

Posted By jim vecchio : April 10, 2013 11:13 am

How about remakes? I thought ZONTAR THE THING FROM VENUS was better than IT CONQUERED THE WORLD because it was in color. However, the movie it was better than, the original movie from which it was derived, IT CONQUERED THE WORLD, had better acting. The acting in the original was only a bit stilted, but the remake, ZONTAR, had reallly stilted acting. Also, the alien and his devices (a huge cucumber with milliped-like feet and devices that were like brainbats) were much better than the ones featured in ZONTAR ( a puny batlike thing and a bulging-eyed pigeonlike somethingorother.

Posted By jim vecchio : April 10, 2013 11:13 am

How about remakes? I thought ZONTAR THE THING FROM VENUS was better than IT CONQUERED THE WORLD because it was in color. However, the movie it was better than, the original movie from which it was derived, IT CONQUERED THE WORLD, had better acting. The acting in the original was only a bit stilted, but the remake, ZONTAR, had reallly stilted acting. Also, the alien and his devices (a huge cucumber with milliped-like feet and devices that were like brainbats) were much better than the ones featured in ZONTAR ( a puny batlike thing and a bulging-eyed pigeonlike somethingorother.

Posted By swac44 : April 10, 2013 11:33 am

Sounds like the ongoing debate in my Sherlock Holmes-loving head over Basil Rathbone vs. Jeremy Brett. Brett is the best Holmes, but Rathbone is the better screen Holmes. (Yes, one is TV and one is film, but the theory is the same. Sort of.)

Posted By swac44 : April 10, 2013 11:33 am

Sounds like the ongoing debate in my Sherlock Holmes-loving head over Basil Rathbone vs. Jeremy Brett. Brett is the best Holmes, but Rathbone is the better screen Holmes. (Yes, one is TV and one is film, but the theory is the same. Sort of.)

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 11:36 am

So, like, The Maltese Falcon is a better movie, but Out of the Past is a better noir, as it is a better exemplar of the genre. Right? So, The Maltese Falcon is better, right?

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 11:36 am

So, like, The Maltese Falcon is a better movie, but Out of the Past is a better noir, as it is a better exemplar of the genre. Right? So, The Maltese Falcon is better, right?

Posted By Jennifer : April 10, 2013 12:00 pm

I don’t think this is what you’re trying to say at all but I may like one film more than another and also accept that the other movie is a better-made movie. The difference between what you’re saying and what I just said is that you like each movie better than the other, whereas I definitely like one better than the other (in my example).

For me, saying one film is better than another film can depend on my mood, a point I’m trying to make (exemplifying), who I’m talking to, or the time of year it is (which is also sort of a mood issue, I will admit).

Posted By Jennifer : April 10, 2013 12:00 pm

I don’t think this is what you’re trying to say at all but I may like one film more than another and also accept that the other movie is a better-made movie. The difference between what you’re saying and what I just said is that you like each movie better than the other, whereas I definitely like one better than the other (in my example).

For me, saying one film is better than another film can depend on my mood, a point I’m trying to make (exemplifying), who I’m talking to, or the time of year it is (which is also sort of a mood issue, I will admit).

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 12:08 pm

robbushblog,Out of the Past is a terrific noir film. But the cheaply made Raw Deal, holds up pretty good against it and all the classic noirs.

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 12:08 pm

robbushblog,Out of the Past is a terrific noir film. But the cheaply made Raw Deal, holds up pretty good against it and all the classic noirs.

Posted By Andrew : April 10, 2013 12:10 pm

I think I know where you are headed here. (I think) The first thing that jumped to my mind was Michael Mann’s Heat and Thief.
By showing both sides and avoiding a bunch of plot holes, Heat is a better crafted movie but none of its key scenes pack the punch Thief does. When James Caan is packing up/sending off Tuesday Weld and the baby or at the adoption agency or at the diner. They both tell basically the same story and while Heat is a better movie, Thief tells the story better.

The other example I came up with is Star Wars. By any critical measure the first one Lucas made has the worst acting, dialogue and, in its original form, the worst special effects. But it is still the best of the six.

Posted By Andrew : April 10, 2013 12:10 pm

I think I know where you are headed here. (I think) The first thing that jumped to my mind was Michael Mann’s Heat and Thief.
By showing both sides and avoiding a bunch of plot holes, Heat is a better crafted movie but none of its key scenes pack the punch Thief does. When James Caan is packing up/sending off Tuesday Weld and the baby or at the adoption agency or at the diner. They both tell basically the same story and while Heat is a better movie, Thief tells the story better.

The other example I came up with is Star Wars. By any critical measure the first one Lucas made has the worst acting, dialogue and, in its original form, the worst special effects. But it is still the best of the six.

Posted By Heidi : April 10, 2013 12:15 pm

I thought I was the only crazy one with thoughts like that! (er…only one with crazy thoughts like that? But I would take Basil Rathbone over anyone else…except Jeremy Brett. I think Rathbone is the better actor, until I see Brett doing his thing…but Rathbone is who I say is better when asked…definately, except…

Posted By Heidi : April 10, 2013 12:15 pm

I thought I was the only crazy one with thoughts like that! (er…only one with crazy thoughts like that? But I would take Basil Rathbone over anyone else…except Jeremy Brett. I think Rathbone is the better actor, until I see Brett doing his thing…but Rathbone is who I say is better when asked…definately, except…

Posted By Andrew : April 10, 2013 12:21 pm

iTunes just gave me another example. Just listened to the Ramones do a bunch of other people’s songs. No way you could ever say the Ramone’s version is better but when they come on, I defy anyone to not turn up the volume. (Needles and Pins, Do you wanna Dance?, California Sun)

Posted By Andrew : April 10, 2013 12:21 pm

iTunes just gave me another example. Just listened to the Ramones do a bunch of other people’s songs. No way you could ever say the Ramone’s version is better but when they come on, I defy anyone to not turn up the volume. (Needles and Pins, Do you wanna Dance?, California Sun)

Posted By kingrat : April 10, 2013 1:19 pm

The film which most perfectly represents a genre is not usually my favorite film in the genre. OUT OF THE PAST is a perfect film noir, covering everything on the film noir checklist, but the way it fits the category is also its greatest limitation. I prefer, say, DEEP VALLEY and THE LONG NIGHT from that same great year, 1947, but could agree that OUT OF THE PAST is the better noir.

Similarly, the most characteristic film of a director is not necessarily the best. MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON would give a newcomer to Frank Capra a better idea of what his films are like, but THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN is the better film. I like THE AGE OF INNOCENCE and AFTER HOURS better than many Scorsese films which are much more representative of his work, which I tend to admire rather than like.

Posted By kingrat : April 10, 2013 1:19 pm

The film which most perfectly represents a genre is not usually my favorite film in the genre. OUT OF THE PAST is a perfect film noir, covering everything on the film noir checklist, but the way it fits the category is also its greatest limitation. I prefer, say, DEEP VALLEY and THE LONG NIGHT from that same great year, 1947, but could agree that OUT OF THE PAST is the better noir.

Similarly, the most characteristic film of a director is not necessarily the best. MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON would give a newcomer to Frank Capra a better idea of what his films are like, but THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN is the better film. I like THE AGE OF INNOCENCE and AFTER HOURS better than many Scorsese films which are much more representative of his work, which I tend to admire rather than like.

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 2:17 pm

kingrat, did you know that Claire Trevor starred in OUT OF THE PAST the same year she starred in KEY LARGO? And she played the same sort of role, the faded gun moll of a gangster. She is famous for KEY LARGO, but I think she was even better in OUT OF THE PAST.

As for Capra, SULLIVAN’S TRAVELS, has the feel of a Capra film, and was obviously inspired by his work, and though an imitation, it is, to me, as good as many of Capra’s best.

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 2:17 pm

kingrat, did you know that Claire Trevor starred in OUT OF THE PAST the same year she starred in KEY LARGO? And she played the same sort of role, the faded gun moll of a gangster. She is famous for KEY LARGO, but I think she was even better in OUT OF THE PAST.

As for Capra, SULLIVAN’S TRAVELS, has the feel of a Capra film, and was obviously inspired by his work, and though an imitation, it is, to me, as good as many of Capra’s best.

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 2:21 pm

kingrat, sorry, scratch that, I was referring to RAW DEAL above, not OUT OF THE PAST. Claire Trevor was in RAW DEAL the same year as KEY LARGO.

Posted By Arthur : April 10, 2013 2:21 pm

kingrat, sorry, scratch that, I was referring to RAW DEAL above, not OUT OF THE PAST. Claire Trevor was in RAW DEAL the same year as KEY LARGO.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 10, 2013 3:25 pm

To confirm for Jennifer, I’m definitely not saying that it is a case of liking one film more but admitting another is made better. No, as I said earlier on Facebook, it’s more of a case of how can I rank the greatest movies of all time when I’m not even sure if I’d go with MALTESE FALCON or CITIZEN KANE in 1941? Two, or three or four, different ways of seeing a movie are necessary and not to be bemoaned.

If someone asked me to rank best gangster movies, I’d rank GOODFELLAS ahead of GODFATHER but probably would put GODFATHER above it overall. That makes sense to me because it’s not about picking one thing alone to judge a movie with but, rather, thinking about all the different things that go into great art.

OUT OF THE PAST is probably my favorite noir because of Robert Mitchum’s deadpan delivery throughout. MALTESE FALCON is still my favorite of the two however but not my favorite as a noir. And somehow, that makes sense to me.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 10, 2013 3:25 pm

To confirm for Jennifer, I’m definitely not saying that it is a case of liking one film more but admitting another is made better. No, as I said earlier on Facebook, it’s more of a case of how can I rank the greatest movies of all time when I’m not even sure if I’d go with MALTESE FALCON or CITIZEN KANE in 1941? Two, or three or four, different ways of seeing a movie are necessary and not to be bemoaned.

If someone asked me to rank best gangster movies, I’d rank GOODFELLAS ahead of GODFATHER but probably would put GODFATHER above it overall. That makes sense to me because it’s not about picking one thing alone to judge a movie with but, rather, thinking about all the different things that go into great art.

OUT OF THE PAST is probably my favorite noir because of Robert Mitchum’s deadpan delivery throughout. MALTESE FALCON is still my favorite of the two however but not my favorite as a noir. And somehow, that makes sense to me.

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 3:48 pm

I hit that nail right on the head then, huh Greg?

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 3:48 pm

I hit that nail right on the head then, huh Greg?

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 3:50 pm

Arthur- I have been unsuccessful in seeing Raw Deal. I’ve seen T-Men several times and wanted to see some of Dennis O’Keefe’s other movies, specifically his noir films. I have heard Raw Deal is fantastic, but I have not been able to see it. Netflix? No. TCM? Not lately, as far as my checking the schedule goes. Can you help a brother out?

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 3:50 pm

Arthur- I have been unsuccessful in seeing Raw Deal. I’ve seen T-Men several times and wanted to see some of Dennis O’Keefe’s other movies, specifically his noir films. I have heard Raw Deal is fantastic, but I have not been able to see it. Netflix? No. TCM? Not lately, as far as my checking the schedule goes. Can you help a brother out?

Posted By swac44 : April 10, 2013 4:41 pm

There was a decent DVD of Raw Deal that wound up in bargain bins that you could probably find cheap. It was released by Sony, as part of its Crime Collection, so I’m guessing it must be a watchable transfer at the very least (I have it on an older noir collection including T-Men released by Roan Collection, but that’s probably harder to find).

Posted By swac44 : April 10, 2013 4:41 pm

There was a decent DVD of Raw Deal that wound up in bargain bins that you could probably find cheap. It was released by Sony, as part of its Crime Collection, so I’m guessing it must be a watchable transfer at the very least (I have it on an older noir collection including T-Men released by Roan Collection, but that’s probably harder to find).

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 10, 2013 4:59 pm

Rob, you’re an expert nail hitter. Always have been.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 10, 2013 4:59 pm

Rob, you’re an expert nail hitter. Always have been.

Posted By Doug : April 10, 2013 5:17 pm

Greg, help another brother out-the photos in your post-I think the last one might be Mike Nichols and Elaine May, but I’m guessing. I have no idea about the others.
I think this is your best post, Greg. Well, I think the last one about “Biopics” is a little better, but this is the best post.
Except for the Biopics one. I Think.

Posted By Doug : April 10, 2013 5:17 pm

Greg, help another brother out-the photos in your post-I think the last one might be Mike Nichols and Elaine May, but I’m guessing. I have no idea about the others.
I think this is your best post, Greg. Well, I think the last one about “Biopics” is a little better, but this is the best post.
Except for the Biopics one. I Think.

Posted By cinemasamurai : April 10, 2013 5:51 pm

Really liked this article, ultimately I’d say that, cinema is art and even strikingly similar, it’s hard to compare art in such a no negotiation, X is better than Y format, that’s why I generally oppose stars, and rating systems when I blog. It’s all contextual, and I really admire the train of thought.

Posted By cinemasamurai : April 10, 2013 5:51 pm

Really liked this article, ultimately I’d say that, cinema is art and even strikingly similar, it’s hard to compare art in such a no negotiation, X is better than Y format, that’s why I generally oppose stars, and rating systems when I blog. It’s all contextual, and I really admire the train of thought.

Posted By kingrat : April 10, 2013 7:05 pm

Arthur, I love Claire Trevor in RAW DEAL. Good point. RAW DEAL was shown at last year’s TCM Film Festival in an archival print from the Library of Congress, and if that ever comes to a noir festival near you, don’t miss it. You can see John Alton’s cinematography in all its noir glory. Eddie Muller pointed out that how unusual it is for a noir to have voiceover by a woman, and a “bad” woman, like Claire Trevor in this film.

Posted By kingrat : April 10, 2013 7:05 pm

Arthur, I love Claire Trevor in RAW DEAL. Good point. RAW DEAL was shown at last year’s TCM Film Festival in an archival print from the Library of Congress, and if that ever comes to a noir festival near you, don’t miss it. You can see John Alton’s cinematography in all its noir glory. Eddie Muller pointed out that how unusual it is for a noir to have voiceover by a woman, and a “bad” woman, like Claire Trevor in this film.

Posted By Gene : April 10, 2013 7:44 pm

Agreed. Makes perfect sense as long as you don’t try to make too much sense out of it. :)

Posted By Gene : April 10, 2013 7:44 pm

Agreed. Makes perfect sense as long as you don’t try to make too much sense out of it. :)

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 8:36 pm

My grandpappy was a carpenter.

Posted By robbushblog : April 10, 2013 8:36 pm

My grandpappy was a carpenter.

Posted By Christine in GA : April 10, 2013 11:26 pm

Arthur, I believe “It, the Terror From Beyond Space” was the inspiration for “Alien.” I read this several years ago and it makes sense to me as the two films are similar. I’ve been a fan of classic horror for decades and loved “It” when I saw it on TV as a kid and again years later on TCM. Greg, enjoyed your thought-provoking post and agree with your comparison of “Stagecoach” and “The Searchers.” To me, “Stagecoach” is the ultimate western.

Posted By Christine in GA : April 10, 2013 11:26 pm

Arthur, I believe “It, the Terror From Beyond Space” was the inspiration for “Alien.” I read this several years ago and it makes sense to me as the two films are similar. I’ve been a fan of classic horror for decades and loved “It” when I saw it on TV as a kid and again years later on TCM. Greg, enjoyed your thought-provoking post and agree with your comparison of “Stagecoach” and “The Searchers.” To me, “Stagecoach” is the ultimate western.

Posted By swac44 : April 11, 2013 7:15 am

I don’t think that’s Nichols & May in that last shot, although I can see the resemblance.

Then again, I thought the guy in the top photo looks like a young Roger Sterling, so what do I know?

Posted By swac44 : April 11, 2013 7:15 am

I don’t think that’s Nichols & May in that last shot, although I can see the resemblance.

Then again, I thought the guy in the top photo looks like a young Roger Sterling, so what do I know?

Posted By Doug : April 11, 2013 10:54 am

According to Dan O’Bannon, “Alien” was in part a do-over of “Dark Star” as a drama, with more money. Rather than the ‘alien’ being a beachball, they made it scary. Very Scary.
I have the Blu ray set which is chock full of special features for all three of the films. I’ve never seen any of the ‘Alien vs Predator’ stuff. No-one on the Blu ray commentaries acknowledges their existence.

Posted By Doug : April 11, 2013 10:54 am

According to Dan O’Bannon, “Alien” was in part a do-over of “Dark Star” as a drama, with more money. Rather than the ‘alien’ being a beachball, they made it scary. Very Scary.
I have the Blu ray set which is chock full of special features for all three of the films. I’ve never seen any of the ‘Alien vs Predator’ stuff. No-one on the Blu ray commentaries acknowledges their existence.

Posted By Arthur : April 13, 2013 11:13 am

Yes, I got my copy of Raw Deal from a bargain bin too. And Christine, thanks, I have to see that film. I think that many films, are constructed from a number of earlier films. James Cameron was the second unit director on GALAXY OF TERRROR which was inspired by ALIEN. When Cameron was handed the director assignment for ALIENS, he appears to have taken ideas and elements of GALAXY OF TERROR and incorporated them into Aliens.

Posted By Arthur : April 13, 2013 11:13 am

Yes, I got my copy of Raw Deal from a bargain bin too. And Christine, thanks, I have to see that film. I think that many films, are constructed from a number of earlier films. James Cameron was the second unit director on GALAXY OF TERRROR which was inspired by ALIEN. When Cameron was handed the director assignment for ALIENS, he appears to have taken ideas and elements of GALAXY OF TERROR and incorporated them into Aliens.

Posted By Pat Turman : April 17, 2013 9:46 pm

Greg, I think I kinda know where you’re going with this. Take Capra: The quintessential Capra movie is either IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE or MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON. But it’s not MY favorite Capra. My favorite being MEET JOHN DOE. And yet I know that the first two are better movies than DOE.

Posted By Pat Turman : April 17, 2013 9:46 pm

Greg, I think I kinda know where you’re going with this. Take Capra: The quintessential Capra movie is either IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE or MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON. But it’s not MY favorite Capra. My favorite being MEET JOHN DOE. And yet I know that the first two are better movies than DOE.

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