In Memoriam: Jesús “Jess” Franco (1930-2013)

franco

If you tuned into TCM Underground on March 15th you may have had the pleasure of seeing Jesús “Jess” Franco’s eerie and atmospheric horror film THE AWFUL DOCTOR ORLOF (1964). When the movie aired I noticed a surprising number of classic film fans discussing the movie on social media sites such as Twitter and I was thrilled that one of my favorite directors was gaining new fans thanks to TCM Underground’s eclectic programming choices. I had no idea that I’d soon be mourning the man who had given me so many moving images to contemplate and enjoy. Jess Franco passed away on April 2 following complications from a stroke. He was 82 years old and still making movies.

Instead of writing another obituary I decided to approach fellow Franco fans and many of his most stalwart supporters who have often championed his work against a tide of indifference. I asked them to simply share their favorite Franco films with Movie Morlock readers in an attempt to introduce you, as well as TCM viewers, to more of the director’s films but what I received was some of the most impassioned and insightful Franco commentaries that I’ve ever come across. I hope you’ll enjoy the results. This is more than just a simple roundtable or survey. This is a lengthy love letter to one of Spain’s most prolific directors and a celebration of everything that made his movies so special.

venus2

HEATHER DRAIN (Heather blogs about movies at Mondo Heather and is a regular contributor to Dangerous Minds. She’s also been published in Video Watchdog, Screem, Ultra Violent and more.)

“I can’t exactly remember when Jess Franco became part of my cinematic periphery vision. It might have been through an old gray market video catalog or Pete Tomb’s classic tome, “Immoral Tales.” Regardless of how the man came into my life, when I had my first taste with ’68′s SUCCUBUS, I was hooked. The underbelly of beauty and the dreamy torture of it all, Franco at his apex was a true maestro. It makes perfect sense that the man was an avid Jazz fan and musician, because his films tend to have the deceptive asymmetry and lush texture of the best of that genre. Maybe Franco was the Coltrane or Miles Davis of his field but truth be told, he was incomparable.

The Franco film that has left the deepest mark for me, however, is 1969′s VENUS IN FURS. Having nothing to do with either Sacher-Masoch’s book or the Velvet Underground song, instead, VENUS IN FURS deals with Jimmy, a musician who discovers the nude body of a beautiful woman washed up on the shore, murdered. He is haunted, unable to escape the past, especially when it creeps back up in the form of Wanda, who is the spitting image of the woman on the beach. The image of James Darren, who is best known in the States for teen fare like GIDGET, brooding with such melancholy to the point where at times he is almost ghostlike, has forever stained my memory. Darren, who was relegated to teen idol status and TV appearances here in the US, is perfect as Jimmy. He wears weathered well.

As the titular Venus/Wanda is producer Harry Alan Towers’ lovely wife, Maria Rohm. It may seem like a vanity casting at first, but Rohm brings the goods as the mysterious and equally troubled heroine. Wanda and Jimmy are two sides of the damaged coin, lost in a world filled with violence, abuse of the undeserving and moth-eaten lust. VENUS IN FURS has the slow burn of a nightmare tinged dream. Losing a filmmaker like Jess Franco, we’ve lost a man whose dedication to cinema pushed him through genres, decades, 35mm to video and the seven headed beast that can be the film industry. But we at least have his massive body of work, in which VENUS IN FURS is one of many shining moments.”

macfranco

DAVID GREGORY (David is co-founder of Severin Films. Severin has released some of Jess Franco’s films on DVD including MANSION OF THE LIVING DEAD, MACUMBA SEXUAL and BLOODY MOON.)

“When I’m asked what my ‘favorite’ Franco films are I usually jump to the top shelf fever dream stuff, the films which play like Jess has his storytelling mind focused on his beloved jazz music rather than linear narrative coherence. EUGENIE – THE STORY OF HER JOURNEY INTO PERVERSION is a safe intro to this world as it incorporates staples such as brilliant Nicolai music, garish visuals, stunning locations, a coterie of great Franco actors and plenty of his trademark erotic obsessions. VENUS IN FURS, VAMPYROS LESBOS, EUGENIE DE SADE, NECRONOMICON, BUT WHO RAPED LINDA?, VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD are some other prime examples. But then I also like THE DEMONS and MACUMBA SEXUAL and AWFUL DR. ORLOF, or an outrageous fumetti inspired women in prison flick like SADOMANIA, or my first encounter with his work, the almost traditional splatter flick BLOODY MOON, and even the hilarious job for hire works like DEVIL HUNTER and so on. The world of Jess is a kaleidoscopic one and thankfully I still have much to discover.”

doctorz

TIM LUCAS (Tim is the editor of Video Watchdog magazine and is the author of a number of books including Mario Bava All the Colors of the Dark and Videodrome: Studies in the Horror Film. He has contributed to publications such as Fangoria and Sight & Sound Magazine and regularly blogs about film at Video Watchblog and Pause. Rewind. Obsess)

“It’s an overused, exhausted phrase but there’s no need to say it again after this: the passing of Jess Franco marks the end of an era – the era of exploitation. A quick scan of his voluminous credits dredges up titles like THE AWFUL DR. ORLOF, LUCKY THE INSCRUTABLE, EUGENIE -THE STORY OF HER JOURNEY INTO PERVERSION, THE BLOOD OF FU MANCHU, A VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD, LORNA THE EXORCIST, ILSA THE WICKED WARDEN, WHITE CANNIBAL QUEEN, THE SADIST OF NOTRE DAME, SEXY SISTERS, DOWNTOWN HEAT, even LULU’S TALKING ASS — it hits you like a montage of the greatest, grimiest hits of 42nd Street. But if you actually bought a ticket, there were thrills and epiphanies and winks to be had.

He may have been the first post-modernist in horror and fantasy; he did in that area what Jean-Luc Godard did with crime pictures in BREATHLESS. SUCCUBUS is probably his key film; it was boldly original for its time, and somehow still more boldly original in the context of his filmography — a profoundly mysterious and erotic art film in the wake of DR. ORLOFF’S MONSTER and ATTACK OF THE ROBOTS. It namedrops a number of his influences: Fritz Lang, Heinrich Heine, Alain Robbe-Grillet, François Villon, Jean-Luc Godard. Strangely, it doesn’t mention Orson Welles — whom he assisted on FALLSTAFF (CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT), directing its acclaimed battle sequences — but his love of Welles drenches his movies, from the beginning, with their low angle wide shots and Dutch angled medium shots.

Anyone can watch THE AWFUL DR. ORLOF, but it means something else when you realize that Franco revered director John Brahm and writer Edgar Wallace; people always compare it to Franju’s EYES WITHOUT A FACE but its real forebears are Brahm’s THE LODGER and Wallace’s THE DEAD EYES OF LONDON (filmed in 1939 as THE HUMAN MONSTER). Anyone can watch THE DIABOLICAL DR. Z but it means something else if you’ve seen ALPHAVILLE. Or ALRAUNE, for that matter. His first film, TENEMOS 18 ANOS (“We Are Now 18″), resonates in THE PERVERSE COUNTESS and LINDA’S HOT NIGHTS. Each of his films plays call-and-answer with all the others (and there is in excess of 200 others), in a way that parallels the molecular theory of reality that says we’re all one. He was such a fanatical filmmaker that he didn’t permit himself closure between one project and the next.

His best movies are dark, introspective, hypnotic jazz poems concerned with the mysteries of love and death and obsession: THE DIABOLICAL DR. Z, SUCCUBUS, VENUS IN FURS (inspired by a meeting with jazz great Chet Baker), LORNA THE EXORCIST, EUGENIE – THE STORY OF HER JOURNEY INTO PERVERSION, VAMPYROS LESBOS, EUGENIE DE SADE (a contemporary gem which he was reputed to have improvised without a set script, working from the 18th century Sade story “Eugenie de Franval”).

There remain a few real gems of Franco that await fuller rediscovery, like his first feature TENEMOS 18 ANOS (a real grab bag of ideas that he continued to rework throughout his career, featuring multiple performances by Spanish comedian Antonio Ozores that predate similar work by Peter Sellers for Stanley Kubrick); THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MIRROR (with a compelling one-shot performance in his oeuvre by the Spanish stage actress Emma Cohen); BAHIA BLANCA (like THE DIABOLICAL DR. Z, a twist on Woolrich’s “The Bride Wore Black” but perhaps the most humanistic and moving of all his films); and CAMINO SOLITARIO (possibly the best of his many films about private detective Al Pereira, with Antonio Mayans giving one of his most feeling performances).

The loss represented by Franco’s death is obviously immense, but he has left us so much to discover. He left us more than 200 movies and variants – some are silly, some are shocking and pornographic, but they are all provocative in some way. That’s more than a filmography; it’s an ocean of cinema we can get lost in.

In the words of Chet Baker, let’s get lost.”

succubus

ROBERT MONELL (Robert maintains the essential Jess Franco blog, I’M IN A JESS FRANCO STATE OF MIND as well as the Cinemadrome forums.)

“My favorites are AL OTRO LADO DEL ESPEJO (aka THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MIRROR), LA COMTESSE NOIRE and SUCCUBUS (aka NECRONOMICON), all journeys into altered states and strange locations which could only have been made by Jess Franco. What I find most interesting about his work is that his films can be viewed in many different ways: as entertainment, low budget art films, exploitation, personal genre experiments, personal statements…. You can watch them over and over and see new and different things each time around. They are a gift which keeps giving.”

venus0

NATHANIEL THOMPSON (Nathaniel manages the invaluable Mondo Digital website and is the author of the DVD Delirium guides.)

“As a movie-gorging kid, I knew the films of Jess Franco long before I was old enough to actually watch them. Thanks to tomes like THE PSYCHOTRONIC ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FILM, titles like SUCCUBUS, 99 WOMEN, and THE DIABOLICAL DR. Z burned into my consciousness despite the fact that no TV station, movie theater, or video store would have anything to do with him. They say you often remember your first time the most fondly, and that’s definitely the case with me and Jess thanks to what remains my favorite of his works, VENUS IN FURS. This mad, jazzy, fragmented injection of cinematic bliss was mainlined straight from my VCR into my veins, and there was no turning back after the first 30 seconds. No one has ever used landscapes, music, light, and the textures of human skin to create a hypnotic symphony like Franco at his best, and when he really hit a fever pitch, he was the purest distillation of pulp poetry I’ve ever seen and one of the few cases where the auteur theory doesn’t just hold water, it’s flat out undeniable. In his wake we now have hundreds of his movies (and I still probably have a few dozen left to catch up with myself), a rich and fertile world for all of us to keep exploring for the rest of our lives.”

virgindead

PETE TOMBS (Pete is the author of Mondo Macabro : Weird & Wonderful Cinema Around the World and the co-author of IMMORAL TALES: European Sex and Horror Movies 1956-1984, one of the essential texts on Jess Franco.)

“Jess Franco may have died, physically, on April 2nd, but I think his soul is still here, flitting about, from scene to scene, from cut to cut, within that vast body of work that he left behind. Jess Franco is dead… Long live Jess Franco!

What I value most about his films is the atmosphere they create. The fact that it was achieved on minimal resources and in record breaking time is remarkable, but it would have been remarkable whatever the production circumstances. Most memorable films – LORNA THE EXORCIST, MISS MUERTE (aka THE DIABOLICAL DR. Z), VIRGIN AMONG THE LIVING DEAD, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MIRROR, EUGENIE, COUNTESS PERVERSE.”

bwdolls1

DAVID ZUZELO (David is a regular contributor to Exploitation Retrospect: The Journal of Junk Culture and Fringe Media and the co-author of Tough To Kill Volume 1 – Italian Action Explosion. He maintains a number of noteworthy blogs including TOMB IT MAY CONCERN.)

“On April 2nd, 2013 Jess Franco passed on from the realm of flesh and his omnipresent smoke and became not only a cinematic legend, but now his name can safely be used to define its very own genre. Because while others may mix pulp with porn, phantasms with fetishes and humor with horror while managing to deliver film after film to producers from around the globe… none can do it with the strange style and subtle elegance (at times) that Jess Franco could. The merit of many of his films can be debated for decades, and they have already done just that, but what is most interesting to me is how admirers of the cinematic addict that was Franco become each and every one unique in their own way. When you start the path in the dark at 3:45 A.M. with a random viewing that concerns a mad scientist and his crazed sex monster assistant (was that really in Black and White???) I don’t think anyone can prepare the open minded viewer for what could happen next. It’s a strange trip, because the celluloid (and unspooled videotape) labyrinth of Franco’s legacy doesn’t come with a map. There are some amazing cartographers and their work available for the intrepid for sure! However, the moment of real freedom, the kind of freedom Franco would indulge when coming upon a plan to shoot a faux slow motion sequence for BARBED WIRE DOLLS with a nude Lina Romay (jiggling in real time!!), comes when the viewer abandons all of the other admirers to our own devices and you join the shared community of loving the journey as much as the films themselves. There is not another experience I’ve had in my 40 years of obsessing over films that can even begin to match it. There is no sense of mastering the catalog of Jess Franco to me, just blissful exploration.

So, can you have a favorite Franco film? I’m going to say no. Well, not exactly. Those that become dedicated to these films, for whatever reason they find be it an unfulfilled need to be a librarian of cinematic minutia or to have a weird kink in their back (or other places) rubbed with reckless abandon, may have similar experiences to mine. Each film becomes a cog built of characters, nightclubs, scenarios and cast members, endlessly rotating amongst a larger and somewhat gleefully diabolical machine that works much like your own imagination. You’ll zoom to black on the curtains of the nether regions because he liked it there. You’ll start to believe that anything can happen in that mystic nightclub where intrigue runs high, smoke swirls free and the beautiful woman everyone wants has a Dutch angle to play on that horny private dick in the corner.

I believe that following Franco films doesn’t give you a favorite film, but a favorite environment, a period in his cinematic travels that sparks your imagination. For some it is the carefully constructed films of the 60s, full of decadence and delightful flesh landscapes. For others, it could be the less sensual and more shocking 70s, or the humorous adult comedies of the 80s. I’m partial to the hand stitched in discarded VHS stock efforts of the 90s. You’ll find yours and then we, all of us Franco fans, will discuss and debate them in the same spirit of experiential cogs in the Franco universe. But at the end of the day, the Franco path can be solitary; your imagination is engaged with the films, filling in spots where budgets fail with recalled bits of other efforts even! It’s a contact high with pure cinema on a good night.

The greatest tribute I could pay to Franco is to know that my imagination was changed by his work, and that my love of movies of all stripes is informed by the passion I have for his. And I will watch them all again I hope. I’ll do it to find the connections get all the stronger between this Orlof and that Orloff and the many Morpho’s that have shambled across the screens. Being a Francophile (as some would say) is like becoming a skeleton key in a very large and intricately designed building. You may or may not fit into the lock of every door, but given enough tweaking and perhaps lubricant, you’ll surely try and be rewarded by what lies beyond that next threshold.

I hope Franco is in an afterlife with his beautiful partner Lina Romay and that he is shooting the movie that was behind his eyes the entire time. He never relented when he was with us, now that he is beyond the flesh, who knows? In the wild world of Jess Franco, there is NO certainty.

Franco was cinema. Franco is cinema. And who here doesn’t love cinema?”

VampyrosLesbos

Further reading:
- Rest in Peace, Jesus “Jess” Franco (1930-2013) by Chris Alexander (Fangoria)
- Iconic Spanish Horror Director Jesús Franco Dies by Shelagh M. Rowan-Legg (Twitch)
- “We’ve Warned You About this Man” – A goodbye to Jess Franco by Nigel Wingrove (founder of Redemption Films)
- CULT HORROR DIRECTOR JESS FRANCO DEAD by Dick Seigel (National Enquirer)

18 Responses In Memoriam: Jesús “Jess” Franco (1930-2013)
Posted By monstergirl : April 4, 2013 4:45 pm

As always a wonderful tribute to the prolific man- Kimberly you’re the best

Posted By monstergirl : April 4, 2013 4:45 pm

As always a wonderful tribute to the prolific man- Kimberly you’re the best

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : April 4, 2013 11:53 pm

Maybe it was a case of cashing in one what marquee value they had, but I also think Franco truly loved working with actors, like Maria Schell, Dennis Price, and Klaus Kinski, whose own personal demons took them from mainstream movies to being part of Franco’s cinematic dreams and nightmares.

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : April 4, 2013 11:53 pm

Maybe it was a case of cashing in one what marquee value they had, but I also think Franco truly loved working with actors, like Maria Schell, Dennis Price, and Klaus Kinski, whose own personal demons took them from mainstream movies to being part of Franco’s cinematic dreams and nightmares.

Posted By DevlinCarnate : April 5, 2013 10:42 am

truly a one-of-a-kind filmmaker and maverick…he was also a jazz musician which is reflected in much of his 60′s output,Venus In Furs being a particular favorite of mine.yes,he did make a lot of rushed and frankly crappy films , but when you’re as prolific as he was, that’s just an occupational hazard

Posted By DevlinCarnate : April 5, 2013 10:42 am

truly a one-of-a-kind filmmaker and maverick…he was also a jazz musician which is reflected in much of his 60′s output,Venus In Furs being a particular favorite of mine.yes,he did make a lot of rushed and frankly crappy films , but when you’re as prolific as he was, that’s just an occupational hazard

Posted By WeirdPaul : April 5, 2013 11:19 am

Great article. I appreciate that TCM has showed some Franco films recently.

Posted By WeirdPaul : April 5, 2013 11:19 am

Great article. I appreciate that TCM has showed some Franco films recently.

Posted By swac44 : April 5, 2013 12:33 pm

Somehow I believe that Jess Franco was never truly happy unless he could hear the sound of celluloid rushing through a camera, a camera pointed at a recreation of something from his own dreams. As others have said, his work contains wonders which will continue to unfold and reveal themselves for decades to come.

Posted By swac44 : April 5, 2013 12:33 pm

Somehow I believe that Jess Franco was never truly happy unless he could hear the sound of celluloid rushing through a camera, a camera pointed at a recreation of something from his own dreams. As others have said, his work contains wonders which will continue to unfold and reveal themselves for decades to come.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : April 5, 2013 2:43 pm

I’m glad people appreciate this post. A lot of love went into it! And it’s nice to see more people sharing their thoughts on Franco and his films. For most of his life Franco was a marginalized figure – even among genre buffs. But cinephilia is rapidly changing and for the better in my opinion. I personally tend to prefer Franco’s 1960-1975 output but I’m still discovering his work & have found films I enjoy that fall outside this time frame. He made over 200 movies and I’ve only seen about 35 so there’s lots more to explore.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : April 5, 2013 2:43 pm

I’m glad people appreciate this post. A lot of love went into it! And it’s nice to see more people sharing their thoughts on Franco and his films. For most of his life Franco was a marginalized figure – even among genre buffs. But cinephilia is rapidly changing and for the better in my opinion. I personally tend to prefer Franco’s 1960-1975 output but I’m still discovering his work & have found films I enjoy that fall outside this time frame. He made over 200 movies and I’ve only seen about 35 so there’s lots more to explore.

Posted By Mike Perry : April 7, 2013 1:21 am

So many times I have watched one of his films and thought “that’s a lousy film” but then I watch another wondering where he was going to take me next. So something must have been working to keep me tuned in.
Just want to comment that my earliest memory of knowingly watching a Franco flick would be Count Dracula with Christopher Lee. I saw it at the right age where it was really freaking me out on late night t.v. after Mom and Dad went to bed. So for that I will always fondly recall the flick, it’s soundtrack and Franco’s zoom in style. Also want to say that Eugenie is a real guilty pleasure worth seeking out.

Posted By Mike Perry : April 7, 2013 1:21 am

So many times I have watched one of his films and thought “that’s a lousy film” but then I watch another wondering where he was going to take me next. So something must have been working to keep me tuned in.
Just want to comment that my earliest memory of knowingly watching a Franco flick would be Count Dracula with Christopher Lee. I saw it at the right age where it was really freaking me out on late night t.v. after Mom and Dad went to bed. So for that I will always fondly recall the flick, it’s soundtrack and Franco’s zoom in style. Also want to say that Eugenie is a real guilty pleasure worth seeking out.

Posted By Fred : April 11, 2013 1:37 pm

My earliest memories of Franco films was in 1972 reading an article in The Monster Times titled “Dracula goes to jail.” It was about the lawsuit involving the US release of a film called Nights of Dracula, which we all now know as Count Dracula. But to my 8 year old eyes, it was strange reading about a Dracula film that didn’t star Christopher Lee, was directed by someone named Jesus Franco, and was the subject of a lawsuit. Not long after that, I read a review in Cue magazine (which eventually merged with New York magazine) about a “new” film called Castle of Fu Manchu, starring Christopher Lee. It was also directed by this mystery man Jesus Franco, although the film reviewer seemed to enjoy having the opportunity to trash the film. Even so, I was intrigued.

Flash forward a few years, and I’m watching Chiller Theater when a film pops up called The Awful Dr. Orlof, directed by the same Jess Franco! And not long after, Count Dracula shows up on Channel 9, having survived its ordeal with the US court system. And now I was hooked. After reading reviews in Psychotronic (generally positive), Phil Hardy’s Horror Encyclopedia (mixed) and the RE:Search book on Strange Films (pretty negative), I knew I needed to learn more…and I’m still learning.

Thanks for posting these rememberances. This was one of the best articles I read on Jess Franco.

Posted By Fred : April 11, 2013 1:37 pm

My earliest memories of Franco films was in 1972 reading an article in The Monster Times titled “Dracula goes to jail.” It was about the lawsuit involving the US release of a film called Nights of Dracula, which we all now know as Count Dracula. But to my 8 year old eyes, it was strange reading about a Dracula film that didn’t star Christopher Lee, was directed by someone named Jesus Franco, and was the subject of a lawsuit. Not long after that, I read a review in Cue magazine (which eventually merged with New York magazine) about a “new” film called Castle of Fu Manchu, starring Christopher Lee. It was also directed by this mystery man Jesus Franco, although the film reviewer seemed to enjoy having the opportunity to trash the film. Even so, I was intrigued.

Flash forward a few years, and I’m watching Chiller Theater when a film pops up called The Awful Dr. Orlof, directed by the same Jess Franco! And not long after, Count Dracula shows up on Channel 9, having survived its ordeal with the US court system. And now I was hooked. After reading reviews in Psychotronic (generally positive), Phil Hardy’s Horror Encyclopedia (mixed) and the RE:Search book on Strange Films (pretty negative), I knew I needed to learn more…and I’m still learning.

Thanks for posting these rememberances. This was one of the best articles I read on Jess Franco.

Posted By Stacia : April 13, 2013 10:04 pm

I’m very late to this post, but I love it. Easily the best article I’ve read about Franco. I’m behind on the cinematic Franco love, having foolishly believed too many people on rec.arts.movies.past-films who considered his films trash. (My dislike of Castle of Fu Manchu didn’t help any.) A couple years ago, when I rented the 1970 Count Dracula, I did so not quite remembering he had directed; once I realized, I knew I had been a fool all these years.

Posted By Stacia : April 13, 2013 10:04 pm

I’m very late to this post, but I love it. Easily the best article I’ve read about Franco. I’m behind on the cinematic Franco love, having foolishly believed too many people on rec.arts.movies.past-films who considered his films trash. (My dislike of Castle of Fu Manchu didn’t help any.) A couple years ago, when I rented the 1970 Count Dracula, I did so not quite remembering he had directed; once I realized, I knew I had been a fool all these years.

Leave a Reply

Current ye@r *

MovieMorlocks.com is the official blog for TCM. No topic is too obscure or niche to be excluded from our film discussions. And we welcome your comments on our blogs and bloggers.
See more: facebook.com/tcmtv
See more: twitter.com/tcm
3-D  Action Films  Actors  Actors' Endorsements  Actresses  animal stars  Animation  Anime  Anthology Films  Art Direction  Art in Movies  Australian CInema  Autobiography  Avant-Garde  Aviation  Awards  B-movies  Beer in Film  Behind the Scenes  Best of the Year lists  Biography  Biopics  Black Film  Blu-Ray  Books on Film  Boxing films  British Cinema  Canadian Cinema  Character Actors  Chicago Film History  Cinematography  Classic Films  College Life on Film  Comedy  Comic Book Movies  Crime  Czech Film  Dance on Film  Digital Cinema  Directors  Disaster Films  Documentary  Drama  DVD  Early Talkies  Editing  Educational Films  European Influence on American Cinema  Experimental  Exploitation  Fairy Tales on Film  Faith or Christian-based Films  Family Films  Film Composers  Film Criticism  film festivals  Film History in Florida  Film Noir  Film Scholars  Film titles  Filmmaking Techniques  Films About Gambling  Films of the 1960s  Films of the 1980s  Food in Film  Foreign Film  French Film  Gangster films  Genre  Genre spoofs  HD & Blu-Ray  Holiday Movies  Hollywood history  Hollywood lifestyles  Horror  Horror Movies  Icons  independent film  Italian Film  Japanese Film  Korean Film  Literary Adaptations  Martial Arts  Melodramas  Method Acting  Mexican Cinema  Moguls  Monster Movies  Movie Books  Movie Costumes  movie flops  Movie locations  Movie lovers  Movie Reviewers  Movie settings  Movie Stars  Movie titles  Movies about movies  Music in Film  Musicals  Outdoor Cinema  Paranoid Thrillers  Parenting on film  Pirate movies  Polish film industry  political thrillers  Politics in Film  Pornography  Pre-Code  Producers  Race in American Film  Remakes  Revenge  Road Movies  Romance  Romantic Comedies  Satire  Scandals  Science Fiction  Screenwriters  Semi-documentaries  Serials  Short Films  Silent Film  silent films  Social Problem Film  Sports  Sports on Film  Stereotypes  Straight-to-DVD  Studio Politics  Stunts and stuntmen  Suspense thriller  Swashbucklers  TCM Classic Film Festival  TCM Underground  Television  The British in Hollywood  The Germans in Hollywood  The Hungarians in Hollywood  The Irish in Hollywood  Theaters  Thriller  Trains in movies  Underground Cinema  VOD  War film  Westerns  Women in the Film Industry  Women's Weepies