Please Sir, Can I Have Some More?

One thing I like to imagine when thinking about a film I really enjoy is what the side characters do in their spare time, that is, when they’re not busy propelling the story of the main character before us.   And I don’t mean what are they doing in this particular scene when they’re off-camera, I mean, “What is their life like outside of this story?” And it’s not like a find the main character dull, it’s just that sometimes that side character is so interesting I can’t help but want some more.

Moreau 01

 Taking minor characters and expanding upon them has a rich tradition in literature.  From William Shakespeare to Sinclair Lewis right on up to Stephen King, playwrights and authors have consistently taken characters from one work and expanded upon them in another.  Whether it’s Falstaff for Shakespeare or entire communities of characters for Lewis and King (minor in one work, major in the next), it’s a way of paying tribute to an interesting character that didn’t get enough attention the first time around.  And it doesn’t have to come from the same author either.  Tom Stoppard imagined the world of literature’s most famous gravediggers in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.   George MacDonald Fraser found Flashman so interesting in Thomas Hughes’ Tom Brown’s School Days that he gave him a full name (Harry Paget Flashman) and twelve books of back story (The Flashman Papers).

So forgive me if, occasionally, when viewing or thinking about a film I love I wish for a deeper portrait of characters that just don’t get the attention they deserve.  One movie I just watched again recently that got me thinking of all this, Island of Lost Souls, has two characters I’d like to see more of but the one that really holds my interest dies in the end.  The first character is Montgomery (Arthur Hohl), a disgraced doctor helping Moreau (Charles Laughton) with his experiments because if he returns to England he’ll be arrested for medical crimes not detailed specifically.  And that’s what makes him so interesting.  He’s an outcast from his profession, disgraced and forced to work for a mad man until, finally, he decides facing his punishment is better than staying on the island.  I’d love to see how he came to work for Moreau and what shortcuts he took that sent him down the wrong road in life.

However, the character I’d really love to see more of is Captain Donahue, played by Paul Hurst.  If you’ve watched enough movies from the thirties and forties, you’ve seen Paul Hurst.  In fact, it’s a good bet that when you saw him, he stole every scene he was in.  Here he plays a hard drinking sea captain for hire and I’d love to see a series of adventures following Donahue as he takes money to do the sailing jobs no one else will take.  He dies in the end of Island of Lost Souls but if I was in charge of the character series, I’d make is so his character was only knocked out and badly injured.   Later, he comes to outside the village that burned down, finds a flask still full in his pocket, drinks up, builds a makeshift raft and heads out for the nearest port.

As long as we’re on a sci-fi/horror bent, here’s another character I could stand to see a lot more of in another setting:  Reporter Ned Scott (Scotty) from The Thing from Another World.  In a movie that ranks as one of my favorites of all time, Scotty (Douglas Spencer) just may be my favorite character.  He’s quick with a joke, has genuine curiosity for the world around him, and won’t back down from a story just because it’s a little dangerous.  Hell, he’s perfect for a continuing series of adventures.  Somebody make that happen, now (and somehow resurrect Spencer for the job).

Jack Hawkins Kwai

Then there’s Major Warden, played by Jack Hawkins, in The Bridge on the River Kwai.  He’s a commando in the war working for the British.  He’s a man who likes his afternoon tea, says “Jolly Good” with reckless abandon and, when push comes to shove, will ram a knife straight through your heart without batting an eyelash.   Even more interestingly, he’s the only member of the commando party on the bridge demolition that gets out alive.  Moreover, he seems to finally let the death and destruction seep in, right at the end.  One could do a series of adventures with him before the raid and a dramatic exploration of his soul after the raid.  Of course, all of these rely upon the original actors (Arthur Hohl, Paul Hurst, Douglas Spencer) playing them for maximum effect and perhaps none more so than Jack Hawkins.  He was a great actor and like the rest of these I’ve mentioned, the series only exists in my mind where the great original actors play the roles in the continuing series (like Tommy Lee Jones as Marshall Gerard).  Without Jack Hawkins, I don’t know if the role would work.

Moving away from sci-fi and adventure, we come to the sixties sexual drama of Alfie, and the great Shelley Winters who is, let’s face it, the only woman on earth who could have played the character of Ruby, the rich American who puts Alfie (Michael Caine) in his place.  Since her character is so marvelously vague, so brilliantly without any major backstory, she could really be someone for a writer to come along and flesh out in stories either before or after her encounter with Alfie.  Maybe even bring the two characters back together in twenty years after they’ve both lost their sexual allure and are living sad, lonely existences.  Good times!

Or how about Nancy Oliver, maid with an attitude, in Gaslight.  Angela Lansbury plays her as a woman angry at her position in the world and young enough, like Flashman, that one could conceive an entire series of movies about her life after the infamous goings on at the Anton house.

And here’s two ultra-minor characters for you, one so minor she doesn’t even exist.  The first comes from All About Eve and it’s Phoebe.  Played by Barbara Bates in a wonderfully drawn bit part, Phoebe is, we are led to believe, the next Eve.  But Phoebe is so much more than that.  In just that tiny little scene, she shows more nerve, more gall, more brass than Eve ever did.  Eve sat outside in an alley night after night and played demure as long as she could until she could make her way into the world of Margo Channing and take over.  But Phoebe?  She just shows up at the door, busts her way in, grabs Eve’s award and admires herself in front of the mirror.  Eve’s mirror!  Phoebe isn’t the next Eve, Phoebe is a force of nature and somebody could make a damn good soap opera out of her ruthless exploits.

And speaking of All About Eve, there’s the non-existent character of Marguerite, played by non-existent Eve Channing, in Sleuth, both directed by Joseph Mankiewicz.  Eh, what?  Well, in Sleuth, the character of Marguerite Wyke, wife of Andrew Wyke (Laurence Olivier) and lover of Milo Tindle (Michael Caine), is listed in the credits as having been portrayed by Eve Channing, an actress who doesn’t really exist but is a combination of the names of the two female leads in All About Eve.  Also, Marguerite the character never appears in the movie.  So, if the character doesn’t even appear in the movie and has a made up actress playing her, how can I possibly want more?  More of what?  Well, think about it:  She’s married to the pompous arrogant Wyke and sleeping with stylish young playboy Tindle. And they’re both willing to destroy the other man’s life for her.  Damn!  I want to know more about her. Not a series, just a one off.  Perhaps a small drama about a woman torn between duty to her husband and the love of her life.  We never see her with them, only with her friends and at the end of the movie, when the police show up to tell her her husband is under arrest for the murder of her lover (or perhaps Wyke kills himself before they can arrest him), we finally realize it’s the mysterious Marguerite from Sleuth we’ve been watching all this time.

?????????????

There are so many more but the post would go on way too long.  The movies have continued character stories for years, especially in the sci-fi/fantasy realm (Doctor Pretorious from Bride of Frankenstein pops up in many different novels and movies through the years and characters from Dracula, including Dracula himself, have of course appeared hundreds of times far away from the source novel).  Some authors, like Tolkien, gave extensive background for their stories and characters in other works (The Silmarillion) and legends like King Arthur have seen side characters grow in other works for years.  On a lighter note, Robot Chicken all but made the sole purpose of its existence fleshing out inconsequential bit characters in Star Wars for comedy vignettes.  So, yes, fleshing out minor characters has happened for years but that doesn’t mean we can’t walk up to our own imaginary Mr. Bumble and ask for more.

82 Responses Please Sir, Can I Have Some More?
Posted By Arthur : February 20, 2013 10:37 am

Yes! A film presents us with a world in itself. What happens to the people in that world after the movie ends? Your imagined lives of minor characters parallels the spinoff series from hit television shows. What about Sean Reagan in The Big Sleep? He is never seen, but the whole story revolves around him. Imagine a film about him.

Posted By Arthur : February 20, 2013 10:37 am

Yes! A film presents us with a world in itself. What happens to the people in that world after the movie ends? Your imagined lives of minor characters parallels the spinoff series from hit television shows. What about Sean Reagan in The Big Sleep? He is never seen, but the whole story revolves around him. Imagine a film about him.

Posted By Brent : February 20, 2013 12:16 pm

How about Ygor from Son of Frankenstein? I’d love to see what he did to get himself hanged. And the “things” the monster did for him…

Posted By Brent : February 20, 2013 12:16 pm

How about Ygor from Son of Frankenstein? I’d love to see what he did to get himself hanged. And the “things” the monster did for him…

Posted By Doug : February 20, 2013 1:05 pm

The best posts here at Morlocks instantly set our minds whirring to come up with examples for the subject.
The first to come to mind are Ma and Pa Kettle, introduced in “The Egg and I” but being given a mainstay series on their own.
Though more of a lead character, who wouldn’t love to see more of Harry Lime from “The Third Man”? It would be great to find out how he became such a scoundrel.
I’ve mentioned here that I once wrote a fanfic ‘sequel’ to Casablanca-it is fun to imagine what else could happen to characters we become invested in.
I would love to know how the lives of Macaulay Conner (Jimmy Stewart) and Liz Imbrie (Ruth Hussey) of “The Philadelphia Story” turned out-did they get married and have a mess of sarcastic kids?
This is a fun game, Greg. I look forward to seeing other examples-each of us has our niche of film interests-I wouldn’t have thought of Shelley Winters in “Alfie”, but it’s all good.

Posted By Doug : February 20, 2013 1:05 pm

The best posts here at Morlocks instantly set our minds whirring to come up with examples for the subject.
The first to come to mind are Ma and Pa Kettle, introduced in “The Egg and I” but being given a mainstay series on their own.
Though more of a lead character, who wouldn’t love to see more of Harry Lime from “The Third Man”? It would be great to find out how he became such a scoundrel.
I’ve mentioned here that I once wrote a fanfic ‘sequel’ to Casablanca-it is fun to imagine what else could happen to characters we become invested in.
I would love to know how the lives of Macaulay Conner (Jimmy Stewart) and Liz Imbrie (Ruth Hussey) of “The Philadelphia Story” turned out-did they get married and have a mess of sarcastic kids?
This is a fun game, Greg. I look forward to seeing other examples-each of us has our niche of film interests-I wouldn’t have thought of Shelley Winters in “Alfie”, but it’s all good.

Posted By Anonymous : February 20, 2013 2:09 pm

Caldicott and Charters, the two cricket-mad Brits from THE LADY VANISHES, got their own mystery series on British TV and it was reasonably good. I’m always disappointed with pastiches of famous characters (as in the various reincarnations of Sherlock Holmes. No one can really bring them to live except the authors who created them (any more than three guys in funny wigs can “be” the Three Stooges) but secondary characters offer much more interesting possibilities.

Posted By Anonymous : February 20, 2013 2:09 pm

Caldicott and Charters, the two cricket-mad Brits from THE LADY VANISHES, got their own mystery series on British TV and it was reasonably good. I’m always disappointed with pastiches of famous characters (as in the various reincarnations of Sherlock Holmes. No one can really bring them to live except the authors who created them (any more than three guys in funny wigs can “be” the Three Stooges) but secondary characters offer much more interesting possibilities.

Posted By David Ehrenstein : February 20, 2013 4:24 pm

The late, great Dorothy Dean dubbed the waiters at Max’s Kansas City “The Phoebes.”

Posted By David Ehrenstein : February 20, 2013 4:24 pm

The late, great Dorothy Dean dubbed the waiters at Max’s Kansas City “The Phoebes.”

Posted By Jack Favell : February 20, 2013 4:34 pm
Posted By Jack Favell : February 20, 2013 4:34 pm
Posted By Richard Harland Smith : February 20, 2013 4:43 pm

Paul Hurst is always so wonderful, even when he’s playing human garbage, as in The Ox-Bow Incident. I recently saw him as part of a three-man Justice League of America (without costumes) in The Public Defender (1931) with Richard Dix and Boris Karloff and as a convict in Each Dawn I Die (1939), helping George Raft to bust out of stir.

I was pleased to see Arthur Hohl turn up in Wild Boys of the Road, playing a sympathetic doctor who must amputate a young boy’s leg. A very well-played and heartbreaking scene, helped immeasurably by Hohl’s disarmingly empathetic performance.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : February 20, 2013 4:43 pm

Paul Hurst is always so wonderful, even when he’s playing human garbage, as in The Ox-Bow Incident. I recently saw him as part of a three-man Justice League of America (without costumes) in The Public Defender (1931) with Richard Dix and Boris Karloff and as a convict in Each Dawn I Die (1939), helping George Raft to bust out of stir.

I was pleased to see Arthur Hohl turn up in Wild Boys of the Road, playing a sympathetic doctor who must amputate a young boy’s leg. A very well-played and heartbreaking scene, helped immeasurably by Hohl’s disarmingly empathetic performance.

Posted By robbushblog : February 20, 2013 4:49 pm

Doug- There was a Third Man radio series that ran from ’51-’52. It was called The Lives of Harry Lime in the U.S. and was set prior to his demise in Vienna. The voice of Harry Lime? Orson Welles. There was also a TV show starring Michael Rennie which ran from ’59-’65.Unfortunately, made him into a hero, of sorts, kind of like the Saint.

Posted By robbushblog : February 20, 2013 4:49 pm

Doug- There was a Third Man radio series that ran from ’51-’52. It was called The Lives of Harry Lime in the U.S. and was set prior to his demise in Vienna. The voice of Harry Lime? Orson Welles. There was also a TV show starring Michael Rennie which ran from ’59-’65.Unfortunately, made him into a hero, of sorts, kind of like the Saint.

Posted By robbushblog : February 20, 2013 4:51 pm

My previous comment needs a good editing. Sorry about that.

Posted By robbushblog : February 20, 2013 4:51 pm

My previous comment needs a good editing. Sorry about that.

Posted By robbushblog : February 20, 2013 4:55 pm

I’d like to see more about Darth Vader. There should be a movie, maybe even a whole trilogy, about how he came to be the way he was; how he turned to the Dark Side and all that. That would be great.

Oops. Sometimes, too much of a good thing is way too much and a character’s mystique is ruined. However, after I saw Devil In a Blue Dress with Denzel Washington as Easy Rawlins, I wanted to see more of Mouse, played by Don Cheadle. As good as the movie was, it was never quite as good as it was when Mouse was onscreen.

Posted By robbushblog : February 20, 2013 4:55 pm

I’d like to see more about Darth Vader. There should be a movie, maybe even a whole trilogy, about how he came to be the way he was; how he turned to the Dark Side and all that. That would be great.

Oops. Sometimes, too much of a good thing is way too much and a character’s mystique is ruined. However, after I saw Devil In a Blue Dress with Denzel Washington as Easy Rawlins, I wanted to see more of Mouse, played by Don Cheadle. As good as the movie was, it was never quite as good as it was when Mouse was onscreen.

Posted By DevlinCarnate : February 20, 2013 6:42 pm

i love the Rathbone Holmes films to the point of obsession,and watch them frequently thanks to a good friend that gave me the UCLA restored versions some years back,and i was fascinated by Giles Conover in the Pearl of Death “This man pervades Europe like a plague, yet no one has heard of him. That’s what puts him on the pinnacle in the records of crime. In his whole diabolical career, the police have never been able to pin anything on him. And yet, if there be a crime without a motive, I’ll show you Giles Conover! If I could free society of this sinister creature, I should feel my own career had reached it’s summit” …not to mention the Huxton Crreeper played by Rondo Hatton who basically appeared in the same part in various and sundry films,but at least in this one,a geographical location even though it’s fictitious…either would make a fascinating back story in my book

Posted By DevlinCarnate : February 20, 2013 6:42 pm

i love the Rathbone Holmes films to the point of obsession,and watch them frequently thanks to a good friend that gave me the UCLA restored versions some years back,and i was fascinated by Giles Conover in the Pearl of Death “This man pervades Europe like a plague, yet no one has heard of him. That’s what puts him on the pinnacle in the records of crime. In his whole diabolical career, the police have never been able to pin anything on him. And yet, if there be a crime without a motive, I’ll show you Giles Conover! If I could free society of this sinister creature, I should feel my own career had reached it’s summit” …not to mention the Huxton Crreeper played by Rondo Hatton who basically appeared in the same part in various and sundry films,but at least in this one,a geographical location even though it’s fictitious…either would make a fascinating back story in my book

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 20, 2013 8:36 pm

Arthur, interesting choice. Sean Regan definitely runs with the wrong crowd and it would make for a good story to see the lives of him and Carmen and Vivian before the events of The Big Sleep come to pass.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 20, 2013 8:36 pm

Arthur, interesting choice. Sean Regan definitely runs with the wrong crowd and it would make for a good story to see the lives of him and Carmen and Vivian before the events of The Big Sleep come to pass.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 20, 2013 8:40 pm

Rob, even though I know you refer to the unfortunate prequels, I would still like to see someone competently tell the story of Vader without making the mystical, spiritual force a bunch of microbes, without the stupid building of C-3PO and, oh yeah, around Luke’s age when first discovered, not a damn kiddie! [shakes head]

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 20, 2013 8:40 pm

Rob, even though I know you refer to the unfortunate prequels, I would still like to see someone competently tell the story of Vader without making the mystical, spiritual force a bunch of microbes, without the stupid building of C-3PO and, oh yeah, around Luke’s age when first discovered, not a damn kiddie! [shakes head]

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 20, 2013 8:41 pm

Mickey Rourke’s arsonist in Body Heat could’ve used a movie of his own. They could make the arsonist from Save the Tiger his mentor.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 20, 2013 8:41 pm

Mickey Rourke’s arsonist in Body Heat could’ve used a movie of his own. They could make the arsonist from Save the Tiger his mentor.

Posted By Qalice : February 20, 2013 9:05 pm

This is usually a sign of great writing, and always a sign of great acting. My example is only the latter: Danny Huston isn’t always in the best movies, but he always seems to me to have dropped in from another movie that’s much more interesting. On stage, Laurette Taylor was famous for seeming to enter from a world at least as real as the written one — somewhat easier when you’re acting in “The Glass Menagerie”.

Posted By Qalice : February 20, 2013 9:05 pm

This is usually a sign of great writing, and always a sign of great acting. My example is only the latter: Danny Huston isn’t always in the best movies, but he always seems to me to have dropped in from another movie that’s much more interesting. On stage, Laurette Taylor was famous for seeming to enter from a world at least as real as the written one — somewhat easier when you’re acting in “The Glass Menagerie”.

Posted By Arthur : February 20, 2013 10:12 pm

Mickey Rourke was fascinating in Body Heat.

Steve McQueen’s credo was to say very little and surround himself with solid journeymen and character actors. For example, in Bullitt he had Robert Duvall, Robert Vaughn, Georg Stanford Brown and Simon Oakland.

As for Sean Regan, you have to believe that one day they will make a movie about him. It would be a natural prequel to The Big Sleep.

Posted By Arthur : February 20, 2013 10:12 pm

Mickey Rourke was fascinating in Body Heat.

Steve McQueen’s credo was to say very little and surround himself with solid journeymen and character actors. For example, in Bullitt he had Robert Duvall, Robert Vaughn, Georg Stanford Brown and Simon Oakland.

As for Sean Regan, you have to believe that one day they will make a movie about him. It would be a natural prequel to The Big Sleep.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : February 21, 2013 3:16 am

In Storm Warning, character actor Stuart Randall plays a DA’s office cop who rides with hero Ronald Reagan in his bid to ankle the Klan. Randall’s character — Walt Walters! — confesses to having been in the Klan when he was young but his dedication to law and fairness is plain from his first scene. He’s so effortlessly cool and rock solid throughout that you keep looking for him even when he’s not in the frame… which is most of the time. He does get to rock a Tommy gun in the final scene, though, and settle the hash of at least one Johnny Bedsheet. Warners should have had Reagan and Randall partner up in later adventures.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : February 21, 2013 3:16 am

In Storm Warning, character actor Stuart Randall plays a DA’s office cop who rides with hero Ronald Reagan in his bid to ankle the Klan. Randall’s character — Walt Walters! — confesses to having been in the Klan when he was young but his dedication to law and fairness is plain from his first scene. He’s so effortlessly cool and rock solid throughout that you keep looking for him even when he’s not in the frame… which is most of the time. He does get to rock a Tommy gun in the final scene, though, and settle the hash of at least one Johnny Bedsheet. Warners should have had Reagan and Randall partner up in later adventures.

Posted By Brian : February 21, 2013 5:48 am

Two roles by Elizabeth Russell have always intrigued me. First as the Serbian woman confronting Simone Simone in The Cat People. Just think of the movie Val Lewton could have made with that character. The role was so brief but memorable.
Also her portrayal of Barbara Farren, the sad beyond words neglected daughter from Curse of the Cat People.

Posted By Brian : February 21, 2013 5:48 am

Two roles by Elizabeth Russell have always intrigued me. First as the Serbian woman confronting Simone Simone in The Cat People. Just think of the movie Val Lewton could have made with that character. The role was so brief but memorable.
Also her portrayal of Barbara Farren, the sad beyond words neglected daughter from Curse of the Cat People.

Posted By Jack Favell : February 21, 2013 8:30 am

I agree with Brian. Russell was incredible in both Cat People films and her characters are so mysterious and hidden that it just makes you want to know more about her.

Posted By Jack Favell : February 21, 2013 8:30 am

I agree with Brian. Russell was incredible in both Cat People films and her characters are so mysterious and hidden that it just makes you want to know more about her.

Posted By Anonymous : February 21, 2013 1:13 pm

The Jimmy Stewart character in “The Philadelphia Story” with Ruth Hussy was my pick too. I can just imagine what their life would have been like if she did get him down the aisle.

But, I want to know more about the day to day lives of Andrew and Armand in “the Scarlet Pimpernel” (1934 ) I love that movie, love Leslie Howard, but evertime I watch it, I want more of Andrew and Armand. What does Andrew do during the day, what is is “day job”? And how about Armand, caring for Percy’s lands in France. He must have a life too. I don’t want to see it now, I would like to have seen it with them, Anthony Bushnell and Walter Rilla. I loved Nigel Bruce as the Prince, but we sort of know know what his life was like, so not much mystery there.

Posted By Anonymous : February 21, 2013 1:13 pm

The Jimmy Stewart character in “The Philadelphia Story” with Ruth Hussy was my pick too. I can just imagine what their life would have been like if she did get him down the aisle.

But, I want to know more about the day to day lives of Andrew and Armand in “the Scarlet Pimpernel” (1934 ) I love that movie, love Leslie Howard, but evertime I watch it, I want more of Andrew and Armand. What does Andrew do during the day, what is is “day job”? And how about Armand, caring for Percy’s lands in France. He must have a life too. I don’t want to see it now, I would like to have seen it with them, Anthony Bushnell and Walter Rilla. I loved Nigel Bruce as the Prince, but we sort of know know what his life was like, so not much mystery there.

Posted By fantomex9 : February 21, 2013 6:15 pm

@robbushblog & Greg Ferrara: The character of Darth Vader (as Anakin Skywalker) is examined daily in the TV series Star Wars: The Clone Wars airing on Cartoon Network. And I like the idea of the Force being tiny creatures similar to mitochondria that are in your system, and that have to be listened to if you want to utilize the Force.

@Greg Ferrara: The best actors to play Major Warden now are:

Jude Law

Hugh Jackman

Ewan McGregor

Gary Oldman

Daniel Day Lewis

Liam Neeson

Posted By fantomex9 : February 21, 2013 6:15 pm

@robbushblog & Greg Ferrara: The character of Darth Vader (as Anakin Skywalker) is examined daily in the TV series Star Wars: The Clone Wars airing on Cartoon Network. And I like the idea of the Force being tiny creatures similar to mitochondria that are in your system, and that have to be listened to if you want to utilize the Force.

@Greg Ferrara: The best actors to play Major Warden now are:

Jude Law

Hugh Jackman

Ewan McGregor

Gary Oldman

Daniel Day Lewis

Liam Neeson

Posted By robbushblog : February 21, 2013 11:28 pm

I hate midichlorians.

Posted By robbushblog : February 21, 2013 11:28 pm

I hate midichlorians.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 21, 2013 11:47 pm

Fantomex9, I hope that now that the rights belong to Disney that we eventually see some STAR WARS reboots, like so many comic book characters get. I really think it would be a good thing to start the series over with some different ideas. I’d love to see the stuff in between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope. So many good Vader stories could be done from that period.

And those would all be good choices for Warden but I think my favorite on your list would be Liam Neeson. Although considering how much older they all are, maybe Jude Law.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 21, 2013 11:47 pm

Fantomex9, I hope that now that the rights belong to Disney that we eventually see some STAR WARS reboots, like so many comic book characters get. I really think it would be a good thing to start the series over with some different ideas. I’d love to see the stuff in between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope. So many good Vader stories could be done from that period.

And those would all be good choices for Warden but I think my favorite on your list would be Liam Neeson. Although considering how much older they all are, maybe Jude Law.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 21, 2013 11:53 pm

Rob, I’m no big fan of midichlorians either because I like the idea that the Force is something achieved, like enlightenment. But the way Fantomex describes it, it’s kind of the same thing, which I understand is what Lucas was going for. They’re still there in all of us but one must be attuned to them. Still, I wish Lucas had left it mystical and not explained it.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 21, 2013 11:53 pm

Rob, I’m no big fan of midichlorians either because I like the idea that the Force is something achieved, like enlightenment. But the way Fantomex describes it, it’s kind of the same thing, which I understand is what Lucas was going for. They’re still there in all of us but one must be attuned to them. Still, I wish Lucas had left it mystical and not explained it.

Posted By robbushblog : February 22, 2013 12:17 am

I also wish it hadn’t been explained. It was cooler as a mystical kind of thing, as opposed to some nasty little bacteria or microbe or whatever.

And Episode IV should just be called “Star Wars”. I’m not down with that “A New Hope” jazz. It came first. It was Star Wars then, it shall always be Star Wars.

Posted By robbushblog : February 22, 2013 12:17 am

I also wish it hadn’t been explained. It was cooler as a mystical kind of thing, as opposed to some nasty little bacteria or microbe or whatever.

And Episode IV should just be called “Star Wars”. I’m not down with that “A New Hope” jazz. It came first. It was Star Wars then, it shall always be Star Wars.

Posted By Anonymous : February 22, 2013 10:04 am

Amen, robbushblog.

Posted By Anonymous : February 22, 2013 10:04 am

Amen, robbushblog.

Posted By Doug : February 22, 2013 1:33 pm

robbushblog:”I’m not down with that “A New Hope” jazz. It came first. It was Star Wars then, it shall always be Star Wars.”
As a high school sci-fi ‘nerd’ I drank in Star Wars, and I remember that “Episode IV” business knocking me for a loop.
“Four? Episode Four? What?”
And then the spaceship slowly took over the top of the screen, and it was fine. I even saw it in French in Montreal in 1978.
Back to ‘side characters who we would love to see fleshed out in more movies’. Any of the original crew of the Nostromo in “Alien”.
We DO have “Oz The Great And Powerful” coming up next month-if that doesn’t fit in this post, I don’t know what does!

Posted By Doug : February 22, 2013 1:33 pm

robbushblog:”I’m not down with that “A New Hope” jazz. It came first. It was Star Wars then, it shall always be Star Wars.”
As a high school sci-fi ‘nerd’ I drank in Star Wars, and I remember that “Episode IV” business knocking me for a loop.
“Four? Episode Four? What?”
And then the spaceship slowly took over the top of the screen, and it was fine. I even saw it in French in Montreal in 1978.
Back to ‘side characters who we would love to see fleshed out in more movies’. Any of the original crew of the Nostromo in “Alien”.
We DO have “Oz The Great And Powerful” coming up next month-if that doesn’t fit in this post, I don’t know what does!

Posted By swac44 : February 23, 2013 9:10 am

My favourite movie is Treasure of the Sierra Madre, so I’ve always been curious about the helpful American who give Dobbs a few pesos, played by the director himself, John Huston. What was he doing there, south of the border? What was his business, and was it nefarious? Only B. Traven knows for sure, wherever he is.

Posted By swac44 : February 23, 2013 9:10 am

My favourite movie is Treasure of the Sierra Madre, so I’ve always been curious about the helpful American who give Dobbs a few pesos, played by the director himself, John Huston. What was he doing there, south of the border? What was his business, and was it nefarious? Only B. Traven knows for sure, wherever he is.

Posted By Arthur : February 23, 2013 2:27 pm

Swacc44 good question. Bogart asks him three times, “Can you stake a fellow American?” and each time Huston gives him a silver dollar,” pre-figuring that he will become part of a trio of prospectors.

It would be interesting to see what happened to the Mexican boy, played by Robert Conrad, who sold him the winning lottery ticket.

Posted By Arthur : February 23, 2013 2:27 pm

Swacc44 good question. Bogart asks him three times, “Can you stake a fellow American?” and each time Huston gives him a silver dollar,” pre-figuring that he will become part of a trio of prospectors.

It would be interesting to see what happened to the Mexican boy, played by Robert Conrad, who sold him the winning lottery ticket.

Posted By robbushblog : February 24, 2013 2:47 am

James West?

Posted By robbushblog : February 24, 2013 2:47 am

James West?

Posted By robbushblog : February 24, 2013 3:10 am

Arthur- I think you meant Robert Blake.

Posted By robbushblog : February 24, 2013 3:10 am

Arthur- I think you meant Robert Blake.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 24, 2013 11:25 am

I just hope that kid kept his eye on the sparrow.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 24, 2013 11:25 am

I just hope that kid kept his eye on the sparrow.

Posted By swac44 : February 24, 2013 12:14 pm

For get the sparrow, I want a pet cockatoo!

Posted By swac44 : February 24, 2013 12:14 pm

For get the sparrow, I want a pet cockatoo!

Posted By Richard B : February 26, 2013 2:42 am

“Kwai” gives us just enough of Warden’s backstory to realize that he’s vastly more complicated than he first appears.

Posted By Richard B : February 26, 2013 2:42 am

“Kwai” gives us just enough of Warden’s backstory to realize that he’s vastly more complicated than he first appears.

Posted By Paul Dionne : March 6, 2013 4:04 pm

I would love to see a series of episodes TV, film or cable that allows Henry Jones’s coroner from Vertigo to offer character judgements on murderers and criminals in trials both famous and infamous. Imagine him going to town on OJ Simpson or Casey Anthony or perhaps especially Ted Kennedy. Or perhaps he could be part of the Bones or Criminal Minds teams…

Posted By Paul Dionne : March 6, 2013 4:04 pm

I would love to see a series of episodes TV, film or cable that allows Henry Jones’s coroner from Vertigo to offer character judgements on murderers and criminals in trials both famous and infamous. Imagine him going to town on OJ Simpson or Casey Anthony or perhaps especially Ted Kennedy. Or perhaps he could be part of the Bones or Criminal Minds teams…

Posted By fantomex9 : March 14, 2013 7:18 pm

@robbushblog; You can hate the concept of the midiclorians as much as you want, but they are a part of the story, and it should not be destroyed or rebooted by Disney in future movies simply because you and everybody else here hates them as a concept.

As it is, I’m getting mighty tired of all of this hate of Lucas and the prequel trilogy, and I’m going to post a link to a set of essays that illustrates why the prequel trilogy was a great thing, and why people like you are just a bunch of spoiled brats when it comes to sci-fi and fantasy:

Why I Love The Phantom Meance

Also, this commentary, while about Star Trek, also has a similar grain of truth related to Star Wars fans: Obnoxious Trekkies

Posted By fantomex9 : March 14, 2013 7:18 pm

@robbushblog; You can hate the concept of the midiclorians as much as you want, but they are a part of the story, and it should not be destroyed or rebooted by Disney in future movies simply because you and everybody else here hates them as a concept.

As it is, I’m getting mighty tired of all of this hate of Lucas and the prequel trilogy, and I’m going to post a link to a set of essays that illustrates why the prequel trilogy was a great thing, and why people like you are just a bunch of spoiled brats when it comes to sci-fi and fantasy:

Why I Love The Phantom Meance

Also, this commentary, while about Star Trek, also has a similar grain of truth related to Star Wars fans: Obnoxious Trekkies

Posted By Greg Ferrara : March 14, 2013 11:18 pm

I seriously doubt anyone will alter basic story concepts of the original Lucas films. Whether or not someone likes or doesn’t like midichlorians, they are, as Fantomex says, part of Lucas’ story canon now. What I’d like to see is more movies that explore characters not focused on by Lucas. I’d like to see some of the expanded universe stuff get major films and probably just leave the original saga alone. Hell, I wouldn’t mind seeing a movie about young Han running black market goods and hanging out in Mos Eisley Cantina.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : March 14, 2013 11:18 pm

I seriously doubt anyone will alter basic story concepts of the original Lucas films. Whether or not someone likes or doesn’t like midichlorians, they are, as Fantomex says, part of Lucas’ story canon now. What I’d like to see is more movies that explore characters not focused on by Lucas. I’d like to see some of the expanded universe stuff get major films and probably just leave the original saga alone. Hell, I wouldn’t mind seeing a movie about young Han running black market goods and hanging out in Mos Eisley Cantina.

Posted By robbushblog : March 14, 2013 11:38 pm

Fantomex- I never said they should jettison the whole concept of the stupid midichlorians. I wish it had never been explained that way. We’re stuck with that whole midichlorian nonsense now. It can’t be undone. It’s gospel. Unfortunately. I don’t totally hate the prequels. I don’t think they’re nearly as good as the original trilogy. I think they lack the fun of the original trilogy. I also think the writing and acting is worse than the original trilogy, by far. I don’t hate Lucas either. I just really hate some of the choices he has made regarding what he’s leaving behind. Actually, I’m kind of worn out by prequels now. Lucas is greatly to blame for that too. :)

I do thank Lucas for giving us Star Wars, Indiana Jones, and Willow though. My life would be less happy without having had Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Willow in it. And the midnight premiere of The Phantom Menace was one of the funnest experiences I have ever had with a large group of friends. So there.

Posted By robbushblog : March 14, 2013 11:38 pm

Fantomex- I never said they should jettison the whole concept of the stupid midichlorians. I wish it had never been explained that way. We’re stuck with that whole midichlorian nonsense now. It can’t be undone. It’s gospel. Unfortunately. I don’t totally hate the prequels. I don’t think they’re nearly as good as the original trilogy. I think they lack the fun of the original trilogy. I also think the writing and acting is worse than the original trilogy, by far. I don’t hate Lucas either. I just really hate some of the choices he has made regarding what he’s leaving behind. Actually, I’m kind of worn out by prequels now. Lucas is greatly to blame for that too. :)

I do thank Lucas for giving us Star Wars, Indiana Jones, and Willow though. My life would be less happy without having had Star Wars, The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Willow in it. And the midnight premiere of The Phantom Menace was one of the funnest experiences I have ever had with a large group of friends. So there.

Posted By motown missile : April 1, 2013 2:43 am

I would very much have liked to seen a series featuring Inspector Karl “Fatty” Lohmann, of “M” and “The Testament of Dr. Mabuse”. It was always very interesting to me that Fritz Lang used him in two movies, almost as though he was planning on Lohmann being the element that tied these and possibly subsequent films together.

As to Jack Hawkins portrayal of Major Warden, I’d much rather see him in more films as Lieutenant Colonel Norman Hyde, of “League of Gentlemen”…maybe films leading up to the events of LOG, or possibly after Hyde’s inevitable escape from prison and his activities after that.

Posted By motown missile : April 1, 2013 2:43 am

I would very much have liked to seen a series featuring Inspector Karl “Fatty” Lohmann, of “M” and “The Testament of Dr. Mabuse”. It was always very interesting to me that Fritz Lang used him in two movies, almost as though he was planning on Lohmann being the element that tied these and possibly subsequent films together.

As to Jack Hawkins portrayal of Major Warden, I’d much rather see him in more films as Lieutenant Colonel Norman Hyde, of “League of Gentlemen”…maybe films leading up to the events of LOG, or possibly after Hyde’s inevitable escape from prison and his activities after that.

Posted By Benzadmiral : April 1, 2013 4:37 pm

Edward G. Robinson’s insurance expert, Barton Keyes, in “Double Indemnity”! He’d have made a good investigator in his own right — he never spotted MacMurray’s Walter Neff as a murderer only because he was too close to the guy. I’ve read that Robinson wrote to James M. Cain, “Indemnity”‘s author, asking for another novel about Keyes that could be adapted into a film for Robinson. What a series that would have been!

Posted By Benzadmiral : April 1, 2013 4:37 pm

Edward G. Robinson’s insurance expert, Barton Keyes, in “Double Indemnity”! He’d have made a good investigator in his own right — he never spotted MacMurray’s Walter Neff as a murderer only because he was too close to the guy. I’ve read that Robinson wrote to James M. Cain, “Indemnity”‘s author, asking for another novel about Keyes that could be adapted into a film for Robinson. What a series that would have been!

Posted By Anonymous : April 3, 2013 12:03 pm

Just about every character in Quai des Orfevres.

Posted By Anonymous : April 3, 2013 12:03 pm

Just about every character in Quai des Orfevres.

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