The Last Wave: A Shadow of Something Real

The Last Wave is a secretive movie.  I don’t mean to say, as the cliche goes, that it keeps its secrets closely guarded.  I mean to say that The Last Wave doesn’t want you, the viewer, to know much of what its characters are doing.  And that doesn’t mean it keeps information from you until it’s needed, like an Agatha Christie whodunnit.  No, it means that characters speak in whispers that aren’t intended to be overheard, visions go unexplained and the meaning of the story – and the story itself – are largely left untouched by the movie.  There is meaning here, and story, but the movie isn’t terribly concerned with providing them in any easily consumable way.  It presents images and clues and hints at something bigger but what that something is goes unexplored.  The end of the world?  A reboot of the culture?  The wild hallucinations of a lawyer going slowly insane?  Who’s to say?  Of this I’m certain: The Last Wave is one of Peter Weir’s best films.

The Last Wave 01

The Last Wave approaches story telling in a way that’s rarely explored anymore.  It gives hints as to character motivations, clues as to story and suggestions as to meaning but nothing is examined straight on.  Things aren’t even suggested visually in a straightforward manner, making one wonder what exactly is going on at any given time during the course of the film.  On the surface, the movie appears to be about a group of Aborigines who have killed another of their group for no clear reason and the lawyer who defends them.  But that doesn’t help much.   The court case is almost inconsequential to the story of the lawyer and his discovery that he is, perhaps, something more than he knows and that what is happening with the weather signals something far bigger than the rainy season.

The lawyer, David Burton, is played by Richard Chamberlain as a kind of harmless, bland white man, doing corporate tax work and happily existing with his wife and two girls, not concerned with the world at large or the Aboriginal world his civilization has infringed upon.  But as the movie opens, that carefree existence is quickly being pulled away.

In the desert landscape, Aboriginal children play on the dusty streets as a nearby school is having its recess.  A storm comes from nowhere and begins to shower down rain and then softball-sized hail forcing everyone to run for cover.  In the city, the rain is a deluge and David soon finds water forcing its way into every aspect of his life.  At home, eating dinner with his family, as the rain pours down outside, he notices waters trickling down the stairs which quickly becomes a small waterfall from the upstairs tub.

At night, David dreams of rain and ghostly men standing in the distance, obscured by shadow, speaking with him in whispers and mournful cries.  In one dream a man appears inside his house, an Aborigine holding a sacred stone marked with blood.  When David is called in to defend a group of Aborigines accused of murder, he realizes one of them, Chris (David Gulpilil, credited in the film as simply ‘Gulpilil) is the man he dreamed of.  David isn’t sure why he’s been called on to defend them (he’s a tax lawyer) but suspects there’s a larger purpose behind it all.

The men’s crime involves the death of another Aborigine who died from drowning.  He was chased out of a bar by the others and was later found dead.  The scene in which he is “killed” is presented as strictly spiritual, with one man, the elder, holding out a death stick by which the person at which it is pointed will die from its curse.  The coroner assumes the man was pushed into a small pool of water and held down but Burton believes something else happened, something to do with tribal customs.

The Last Wave 04

His co-worker who is an expert of Aboriginal law tells him he’s crazy.  Tribal law applies only to tribal Aborigines and these are city Aborigines.  That is, they don’t subscribe to such things but David thinks they are tribal Aborigines living in the city.  His co-worker leaves him to the case but not before telling him that his attitudes on Aborigines are condescending and offensive.

Later, Chris arrives to discuss the case and brings Charlie (Nandjiwarra Amagula), a mystic who will help David understand things a little better and by “things” I mean, “nothing at all about the case but instead about what is happening with the world.”  Or something like that.

From there, David learns more about himself and what his purpose in all of this might be.   His father tells him that when he was young, David had dreams about his mother’s death for a full month before she died and when she did, she died exactly as David’s dreams had foreshadowed.   His dreams of rain and impending doom seem more urgent now as David tries to understand the connection between those dreams and the Aborigines.  And the real world is becoming more like the dreams all the time.  The heavy rains and hail storms give way to frogs dropping out of the cloud and deluges of mud and oil.  And David’s “dreams” begin to appear during his waking hours when, behind the wheel of his car, he can clearly see the city under water, its inhabitants drowned under the force of a massive wave.

As we head into the climax, the court case is decided off-screen with no great fanfare, or any at all.  That’s because the court case itself, not the crime that precipitated it,  is beside the point of the movie, acting as a MacGuffin whose sole purpose is to get Chris and David together and provide a moment, under oath, where Chris has to tell David what he has been avoiding telling him from the beginning.   And when David gets the information, and Charlie acts on it, the movie doesn’t shy away from its supernatural origins.

In 1977, Peter Weir was coming off the success of Picnic at Hanging Rock, the more famous of the two movies, and The Last Wave continued an exploration of Australian culture and the uneasy mix of the white and Aboriginal societies.   One of the differences between the two is that The Last Wave does reveal its secrets, to a degree, and fully embraces its paranormal dimensions.  It doesn’t pretend that any or all of this was happening in David’s mind but rather takes it at face value that, indeed, the characters are supernatural and the endgame of their dreamtime will soon be upon us.

The Last Wave 02

More importantly, Weir inverted the cultural clash into an other-worldly struggle between gods and men and, as a result, created something intriguing beyond the plot mechanics of a murder story (when we find out why the man was killed, it is comes as a thunderous anti-climax).  Perhaps the mysticism of the story was too much for audiences to take seriously or perhaps they really were hoping for a good, solid courtroom drama but whatever the case, The Last Wave didn’t have the same impact as Picnic at Hanging Rock and Weir went on to make straightforward dramas (and even a romantic comedy) for several years afterwards before taking a slight mystical turn one more time with Fearless.   After viewing The Last Wave again, I cannot but hope that, one day, Weir will return to the Australian landscape and once again take us into the soul of Australia like few others can.

36 Responses The Last Wave: A Shadow of Something Real
Posted By Arthur : February 6, 2013 10:42 am

Sounds like my kind of movie! BTW there is something very different about many Australian films. And part of the reason may be because of these aboriginal spiritual presences. For example, On the Beach, Japanese Story, even Mad Max.

Posted By Arthur : February 6, 2013 10:42 am

Sounds like my kind of movie! BTW there is something very different about many Australian films. And part of the reason may be because of these aboriginal spiritual presences. For example, On the Beach, Japanese Story, even Mad Max.

Posted By Benboom : February 6, 2013 11:37 am

Of the two I always thought Last Wave was a much more interesting film than Hanging Rock, although I liked that one too. I didn’t realize that Last Wave had been less successful than Hanging Rock – that’s really a shame, as it is a wonderful film. One thing you didn’t mention about it is the score, which I think makes brilliant use of that era’s synthesizer technology; I tend not to like scores of the era that use synths because of their gamelike sound but this one is very different. The scene where the water starts to come down the stairs is accompanied by one of the most subtle cues I’ve ever come across. Fantastic music, and pretty minimalist in its presence, given how much impact it has and how much it adds to the film.

Posted By Benboom : February 6, 2013 11:37 am

Of the two I always thought Last Wave was a much more interesting film than Hanging Rock, although I liked that one too. I didn’t realize that Last Wave had been less successful than Hanging Rock – that’s really a shame, as it is a wonderful film. One thing you didn’t mention about it is the score, which I think makes brilliant use of that era’s synthesizer technology; I tend not to like scores of the era that use synths because of their gamelike sound but this one is very different. The scene where the water starts to come down the stairs is accompanied by one of the most subtle cues I’ve ever come across. Fantastic music, and pretty minimalist in its presence, given how much impact it has and how much it adds to the film.

Posted By KenK : February 6, 2013 4:52 pm

I saw this movie years ago with a friend. It was pouring rain outside, and from time to time, during the movie, we’d hear momentary deluges, thunder. It was terrifying. This movie is beautiful and haunting.

I remember seeing this film around the same time as Nicholas Roeg’s Walkabout. It seemed to be a time of amazing movies about Australia.

Posted By KenK : February 6, 2013 4:52 pm

I saw this movie years ago with a friend. It was pouring rain outside, and from time to time, during the movie, we’d hear momentary deluges, thunder. It was terrifying. This movie is beautiful and haunting.

I remember seeing this film around the same time as Nicholas Roeg’s Walkabout. It seemed to be a time of amazing movies about Australia.

Posted By DevlinCarnate : February 6, 2013 7:31 pm

i saw this at the old Harvard Square theater with a lot of other cinematic anomalies…but i guess the subtleties went over my head…Richard Chamberlain was a hot commodity after all the made for TV epics like Shogun,and i always wondered why he made,or was picked for this movie..i know this was a few years before them,but not exactly a “name” actor at the time

Posted By DevlinCarnate : February 6, 2013 7:31 pm

i saw this at the old Harvard Square theater with a lot of other cinematic anomalies…but i guess the subtleties went over my head…Richard Chamberlain was a hot commodity after all the made for TV epics like Shogun,and i always wondered why he made,or was picked for this movie..i know this was a few years before them,but not exactly a “name” actor at the time

Posted By Gene : February 6, 2013 7:38 pm

I have really liked the Peter Weir films I have seen, especially Picnic at Hanging Rock and Gallipoli. The former film’s enigmatic ending lingers long after viewing so I will definitely place this on my to-watch list.

Posted By Gene : February 6, 2013 7:38 pm

I have really liked the Peter Weir films I have seen, especially Picnic at Hanging Rock and Gallipoli. The former film’s enigmatic ending lingers long after viewing so I will definitely place this on my to-watch list.

Posted By Susan Doll : February 6, 2013 10:42 pm

Am a big fan of Peter Weir’s and became one after seeing LAST WAVE and HANGING ROCK. I have always liked Australian films.

Posted By Susan Doll : February 6, 2013 10:42 pm

Am a big fan of Peter Weir’s and became one after seeing LAST WAVE and HANGING ROCK. I have always liked Australian films.

Posted By changeling69 : February 7, 2013 7:07 am

Alright, now you guys are playing in MY universe, MY beloved homeland Australia!:)
I was born in Wollongong, a little big town :) on the South Coast of NSW, about 90km south of Sydney. I grew up there in tghe “roaring 70s” and later moved with my family to Europe where I now work as an ESOL teacher. I go back to OZ (or Down Under:)) very often and every time I have to return to the E.U. I feel homesick….a MAGICAL kind of homesick, may I add. You can never understand the magic of OZ unless you grow up there. It’s like living in another dimension (so says my Italian GF who always travels with me). Peter Weir is Aussie and knows very well about this magic (ref Picnic at Hnging Rock:). Many people talk about Area 51 and Roswell as if that kind of ‘magic’ is the only form of its kind on the planet. Nope, we in OZ have our own little and very unknown “Area 51″ called PINE GAP, a very secretive Australian/U.S. project area!! Our fine Aboriginals are one of the most magical races on the planet. Want to know more? Just take a trip Down Under and feel the secretive magic the moment you land at mascot International Airport.

Posted By changeling69 : February 7, 2013 7:07 am

Alright, now you guys are playing in MY universe, MY beloved homeland Australia!:)
I was born in Wollongong, a little big town :) on the South Coast of NSW, about 90km south of Sydney. I grew up there in tghe “roaring 70s” and later moved with my family to Europe where I now work as an ESOL teacher. I go back to OZ (or Down Under:)) very often and every time I have to return to the E.U. I feel homesick….a MAGICAL kind of homesick, may I add. You can never understand the magic of OZ unless you grow up there. It’s like living in another dimension (so says my Italian GF who always travels with me). Peter Weir is Aussie and knows very well about this magic (ref Picnic at Hnging Rock:). Many people talk about Area 51 and Roswell as if that kind of ‘magic’ is the only form of its kind on the planet. Nope, we in OZ have our own little and very unknown “Area 51″ called PINE GAP, a very secretive Australian/U.S. project area!! Our fine Aboriginals are one of the most magical races on the planet. Want to know more? Just take a trip Down Under and feel the secretive magic the moment you land at mascot International Airport.

Posted By David : February 7, 2013 9:29 am

Thanks for refreshing my memory with a very interesting post Greg.
I saw The Last Wave upon release, in 1977 (when I was 18), in my hometown of Melbourne.
I’ve only had an interrupted second viewing on television quite a few years after that, but the film sits quite fondly in my memory.
It certainly suffers from the “second album” syndrome, due to the fact that Picnic At Hanging Rock was such a successful film, and seemed to be universally well liked, here and abroad. We have a cultural phenomenom here in Australia called the ‘Tall Poppy Treatment’ which is, simply put, a form of public criticism or derision dished out to someone who has recently enjoyed public praise and/or financial success, and its meted out (usually by the media) so the party concerned ‘doesn’t get too uppity or too much of a swelled head’. I believe TLW and Weir both copped this when the film came out, from Australian film critics of the day, eager to give Weir some stick.
I like TLW’s enigmatic qualities, and its unusual extrapolation on the nature of Aboriginal Dreamtime, and Chamberlain’s casting was the right choice. To go off on a short tangent – back in the late 70s and early 80s one of the conditions of govt. film funding was to have at least one overseas ‘star’ in an Australian film, so local (and overseas export) audiences would recognize at least one actor in it!
The Last Wave comes from a time when the modern Australian Film Industry was struggling to get to its feet, and all sorts of stories seemed possible, not just mainstream entertainments, but films that would reflect ourselves in some way. Unfortunately, that’s prettymuch all gone now. Greg, those elements that you find so attractive in The Last Wave most Australians, I feel, couldn’t care less about now. Its a film that would never be made now, but I sure wish they were, thanks for bringing your attention to it.

P.S. Would you believe I’m yet to stumble across a DVD of this film yet?

Posted By David : February 7, 2013 9:29 am

Thanks for refreshing my memory with a very interesting post Greg.
I saw The Last Wave upon release, in 1977 (when I was 18), in my hometown of Melbourne.
I’ve only had an interrupted second viewing on television quite a few years after that, but the film sits quite fondly in my memory.
It certainly suffers from the “second album” syndrome, due to the fact that Picnic At Hanging Rock was such a successful film, and seemed to be universally well liked, here and abroad. We have a cultural phenomenom here in Australia called the ‘Tall Poppy Treatment’ which is, simply put, a form of public criticism or derision dished out to someone who has recently enjoyed public praise and/or financial success, and its meted out (usually by the media) so the party concerned ‘doesn’t get too uppity or too much of a swelled head’. I believe TLW and Weir both copped this when the film came out, from Australian film critics of the day, eager to give Weir some stick.
I like TLW’s enigmatic qualities, and its unusual extrapolation on the nature of Aboriginal Dreamtime, and Chamberlain’s casting was the right choice. To go off on a short tangent – back in the late 70s and early 80s one of the conditions of govt. film funding was to have at least one overseas ‘star’ in an Australian film, so local (and overseas export) audiences would recognize at least one actor in it!
The Last Wave comes from a time when the modern Australian Film Industry was struggling to get to its feet, and all sorts of stories seemed possible, not just mainstream entertainments, but films that would reflect ourselves in some way. Unfortunately, that’s prettymuch all gone now. Greg, those elements that you find so attractive in The Last Wave most Australians, I feel, couldn’t care less about now. Its a film that would never be made now, but I sure wish they were, thanks for bringing your attention to it.

P.S. Would you believe I’m yet to stumble across a DVD of this film yet?

Posted By Doug : February 7, 2013 9:32 am

changeling69: do you keep up with “Hamish and Andy” podcasts to stay in touch with your homeland? Good on ya.
I’ve always wanted to visit Australia/NZ but as close as I’ll ever get is to see it in films.

Posted By Doug : February 7, 2013 9:32 am

changeling69: do you keep up with “Hamish and Andy” podcasts to stay in touch with your homeland? Good on ya.
I’ve always wanted to visit Australia/NZ but as close as I’ll ever get is to see it in films.

Posted By swac44 : February 7, 2013 4:25 pm

I’m on the flipside of changeling69′s equation, my partner hails from Perth, and I was able to accompany her back home a couple of years ago for one of the most memorable trips of my life. Among the highlights was a trek through Kakadu, in the Northern Territory, accompanied by an aboriginal guide who’d grown up there, tearing down red dust roads in his trusty Toyota truck (a bigger status symbol than a BMW or Lexus in that part of the world). He took us well off the beaten track on a number of occasions, and showed us ancient rock paintings whose meanings are up to interpretation, but he explained how they’re often misunderstood by anthropologists. I knew a bit about the Dreamtime prior to my trip, but our guide really explained how folklore and culture are tied into the amazing landscape, which is constantly full of surprises.

Someone beat me to a Walkabout reference earlier (which provided David Gulpilil with his first screen role), but there’s also Fred Schepisi’s The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith, which shows what happens when white and aboriginal cultures collide, with brutal results. Less well-known is 2006′s Jindabyne, a sort-of murder mystery about a group of white men who discover the body of an aboriginal girl while on a fishing trip in a remote part of the wilderness. I say “sort-of murder mystery” because the film is more about the repercussions of the body’s discovery than it is about what happened to the young woman, but once again the uneasy coexistence of aboriginals and white Australians makes for an engaging drama.

Posted By swac44 : February 7, 2013 4:25 pm

I’m on the flipside of changeling69′s equation, my partner hails from Perth, and I was able to accompany her back home a couple of years ago for one of the most memorable trips of my life. Among the highlights was a trek through Kakadu, in the Northern Territory, accompanied by an aboriginal guide who’d grown up there, tearing down red dust roads in his trusty Toyota truck (a bigger status symbol than a BMW or Lexus in that part of the world). He took us well off the beaten track on a number of occasions, and showed us ancient rock paintings whose meanings are up to interpretation, but he explained how they’re often misunderstood by anthropologists. I knew a bit about the Dreamtime prior to my trip, but our guide really explained how folklore and culture are tied into the amazing landscape, which is constantly full of surprises.

Someone beat me to a Walkabout reference earlier (which provided David Gulpilil with his first screen role), but there’s also Fred Schepisi’s The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith, which shows what happens when white and aboriginal cultures collide, with brutal results. Less well-known is 2006′s Jindabyne, a sort-of murder mystery about a group of white men who discover the body of an aboriginal girl while on a fishing trip in a remote part of the wilderness. I say “sort-of murder mystery” because the film is more about the repercussions of the body’s discovery than it is about what happened to the young woman, but once again the uneasy coexistence of aboriginals and white Australians makes for an engaging drama.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 7, 2013 11:16 pm

Sorry, I’ve been busy on other projects and my daughter’s been home sick from school. I’m thrilled to see so many positive responses to the film. I really miss movies that feel less rushed in their editing styles like this one. It has a great dreamlike feel throughout.

Devlin, Chamberlain had made THE MUSIC LOVERS for Ken Russell years before this as well as THE THREE MUSKETEERS. He was definitely big enough to fit the requirement David mentions in his comment.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 7, 2013 11:16 pm

Sorry, I’ve been busy on other projects and my daughter’s been home sick from school. I’m thrilled to see so many positive responses to the film. I really miss movies that feel less rushed in their editing styles like this one. It has a great dreamlike feel throughout.

Devlin, Chamberlain had made THE MUSIC LOVERS for Ken Russell years before this as well as THE THREE MUSKETEERS. He was definitely big enough to fit the requirement David mentions in his comment.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 7, 2013 11:17 pm

I especially appreciate the love of Australian film because it encourages me to see more. I haven’t seen nearly as much as I should but from what I’ve seen, I share Susan’s love for it: The look, the mood, the physical qualities. It’s like the American west in many ways with that same desolate but beautiful quality.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 7, 2013 11:17 pm

I especially appreciate the love of Australian film because it encourages me to see more. I haven’t seen nearly as much as I should but from what I’ve seen, I share Susan’s love for it: The look, the mood, the physical qualities. It’s like the American west in many ways with that same desolate but beautiful quality.

Posted By David : February 7, 2013 11:50 pm

Just like to add to swac44′s recommendations Rolf de Heer’s TEN CANOES. This film conveys the sense of long continuity of Aboriginal life from ancient times to recent times, as well as their cultural points of view, and perception of time; all before white men arrived, not quite 250 years ago.
Set in Arnhem Land in northern Australia, and made with the descendants of the tribal groups in the film, there is a distinct otherworldly feel to the film and a non Aboriginal audience will have a glimpse, and perhaps have some understanding, of a way of life that existed for several thousand years before white settlement.

Posted By David : February 7, 2013 11:50 pm

Just like to add to swac44′s recommendations Rolf de Heer’s TEN CANOES. This film conveys the sense of long continuity of Aboriginal life from ancient times to recent times, as well as their cultural points of view, and perception of time; all before white men arrived, not quite 250 years ago.
Set in Arnhem Land in northern Australia, and made with the descendants of the tribal groups in the film, there is a distinct otherworldly feel to the film and a non Aboriginal audience will have a glimpse, and perhaps have some understanding, of a way of life that existed for several thousand years before white settlement.

Posted By changeling69 : February 8, 2013 6:28 am

It’s so good to see that so many film buffs luv everything OZ has to offer…..becasue we have LOTS to offer. Like America years ago, Australia is a very young nation and has only to the future to look at, just like America still does, and that means that the entertainment industry is still in its nappies actually, even though we’ve come a long way since the Number 69 soap opera-Paul Hogan Show-Rolf Harris-Homicide days. Actors and actresses like Rod Taylor, Olivia Newton-John, Paul Hogan, etc. have emerged and are now big time in the U.S. 2:)…dream on in Dreamtime:).

Posted By changeling69 : February 8, 2013 6:28 am

It’s so good to see that so many film buffs luv everything OZ has to offer…..becasue we have LOTS to offer. Like America years ago, Australia is a very young nation and has only to the future to look at, just like America still does, and that means that the entertainment industry is still in its nappies actually, even though we’ve come a long way since the Number 69 soap opera-Paul Hogan Show-Rolf Harris-Homicide days. Actors and actresses like Rod Taylor, Olivia Newton-John, Paul Hogan, etc. have emerged and are now big time in the U.S. 2:)…dream on in Dreamtime:).

Posted By swac44 : February 8, 2013 8:40 am

Absolutely loved Ten Canoes (and it didn’t hurt that I got to see it projected in 35mm either). A beautiful and moving film experience. (And David Gulpilil’s in it too.)

As for comparing Australia to the American West, there are lots of films that fit that description, most notably The Proposition which I’ve heard called a “Vegemite western” even though it actually takes place in the outback, and isn’t remotely like Italian filmmakers using Spain to replicate Texas. Even Quigley Down Under is worth a look, it makes you wish Tom Selleck had been given some better leading role opportunities, and you’ve got Alan Rickman as the bad guy which makes it an instant must-see.

We’ve got a whole shelf devoted to Australian films, expanded not too long ago by the flood of so-called “Ozploitation” films that were reissued following the fun Not Quite Hollywood documentary which chronicled the early growing pains of the Australian film industry in the ’70s, where a penchant for sex and violence made for some highly entertaining genre pictures. Not all of them have aged well, but a few like Turkey Shoot and Road Games still pack a punch.

Posted By swac44 : February 8, 2013 8:40 am

Absolutely loved Ten Canoes (and it didn’t hurt that I got to see it projected in 35mm either). A beautiful and moving film experience. (And David Gulpilil’s in it too.)

As for comparing Australia to the American West, there are lots of films that fit that description, most notably The Proposition which I’ve heard called a “Vegemite western” even though it actually takes place in the outback, and isn’t remotely like Italian filmmakers using Spain to replicate Texas. Even Quigley Down Under is worth a look, it makes you wish Tom Selleck had been given some better leading role opportunities, and you’ve got Alan Rickman as the bad guy which makes it an instant must-see.

We’ve got a whole shelf devoted to Australian films, expanded not too long ago by the flood of so-called “Ozploitation” films that were reissued following the fun Not Quite Hollywood documentary which chronicled the early growing pains of the Australian film industry in the ’70s, where a penchant for sex and violence made for some highly entertaining genre pictures. Not all of them have aged well, but a few like Turkey Shoot and Road Games still pack a punch.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : February 8, 2013 2:00 pm

I often think of this movie, in particular, when I bemoan what has been lost in horror movies over the last 40 years. It’s just so intelligent and so free of attitude, posturing, and cant. I rate this one slightly higher than Picnic at Hanging Rock, which is eerie, to be sure, but somewhat soporific to me. And there’s more of an investigatory process going on in The Last Wave, which keeps me beguiled from beginning to end, even after repeat viewings.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : February 8, 2013 2:00 pm

I often think of this movie, in particular, when I bemoan what has been lost in horror movies over the last 40 years. It’s just so intelligent and so free of attitude, posturing, and cant. I rate this one slightly higher than Picnic at Hanging Rock, which is eerie, to be sure, but somewhat soporific to me. And there’s more of an investigatory process going on in The Last Wave, which keeps me beguiled from beginning to end, even after repeat viewings.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 9, 2013 10:27 am

Ten Canoes is now high on my list of movies to see (it’s a looooooong list). Also, Not Quite Hollywood, with which I am completely unfamiliar.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 9, 2013 10:27 am

Ten Canoes is now high on my list of movies to see (it’s a looooooong list). Also, Not Quite Hollywood, with which I am completely unfamiliar.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 9, 2013 10:32 am

And there’s more of an investigatory process going on in The Last Wave, which keeps me beguiled from beginning to end, even after repeat viewings.

The Last Wave works as a suspense thriller as well, almost a kind of subdued procedural with Burton as the detective on the case. I also like very much that they didn’t attempt some big special effects sequence at the end, either using optical overlay or miniatures to show us a giant wave approaching Sydney. If this ever gets remade, that’s the first thing they’re going to do, play up the disastrous weather aspects of it.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : February 9, 2013 10:32 am

And there’s more of an investigatory process going on in The Last Wave, which keeps me beguiled from beginning to end, even after repeat viewings.

The Last Wave works as a suspense thriller as well, almost a kind of subdued procedural with Burton as the detective on the case. I also like very much that they didn’t attempt some big special effects sequence at the end, either using optical overlay or miniatures to show us a giant wave approaching Sydney. If this ever gets remade, that’s the first thing they’re going to do, play up the disastrous weather aspects of it.

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