Destruction, Inc. Deconstructed

Some of the best, most inventive superhero short subjects ever produced were the Superman shorts in the early forties.  The first nine were produced by Max and Dave Fleischer of Fleischer Studios and the final eight were produced by Famous Studios after the Fleischers hit the road.  The difference in style between the two halves is minimal while the difference in content is stark.  The Fleischer shorts had adventure/science fiction themes while the Famous Studio shorts were all about good old fashioned pro-America propaganda.  After all, most of the Fleischer cartoons were produced before Pearl Harbor while the Famous Studio shorts came after.

Superman Cover Card

While the Fleischer shorts are pure adventure entertainment, there is something distinctly insane about the Famous Studio shorts that makes them more intriguing from a historical perspective.  The imagery and language can be offensive, such as Japoteurs,  and/or absolutely cringe-inducing, such as the jaw-dropping Jungle Drums.  In Jungle Drums, an African tribe worships a Nazi white-knight and do his bidding but never speak and display no intellectual curiosity whatsoever.  The animation is quite striking throughout but everything else is so appalling it negates every positive emotion, even robbing the modern audience the pleasure of seeing a defeated Adolph Hitler make an angry cameo at the end.  But that doesn’t mean it’s not absolutely fascinating on every level.

The Famous Studio shorts (as well as the Fleischer Studio shorts) are in the public domain, languishing and falling into washed-out disrepair.  It’s a shame, really, because they deserve the full restorative treatment.  They are, to my mind, some of the most amazing propaganda instruments ever created:  A comic book character, appealing to youngsters, is able to properly indoctrinate them into the correct belief systems so they may be a good and upstanding [insert country of choice here] citizen.  In this case, the United States, but countries around the world have used stories that appeal to children as propaganda tools to indoctrinate other children for as long as the idea has existed (including martyred innocents).  Famous Studios fought against the enemy with a still young yet already iconic superhero character, insuring excitement and adventure along with the message.

But they’re also so cock-eyed and half-baked with the concept of a superman from another planet that an entirely different level of entertainment exists, one in which the brazen inconsistency of Superman’s powers and the almost complete absence of any logical abilities from his Kryptonian mind, add to an inebriating brew of lunacy that can’t help but intoxicate the viewer.  The best episode to illustrate this is 1942′s Deconstruction, Inc.  Let’s look at it, choosing particular frames to comment on the story.  Oh, and spoilers, of course.  The whole story, in fact.

Superman 000a

First we get the title card and, as with all of the shorts from Fleischer to Famous, it’s a great one.  The title cards in this series are all very inventive from a propaganda point of view.  No character in this episode is Japanese but the title card implies the saboteurs we will follow are working for the Japanese.

Superman 000b

Now we see a swamp outside the Metropolis Munitions Works.  In a nice touch, the camera glides past the hand before “noticing” it and double-takes back.  As the hand sinks away we see a car drive off at the edge of the swamp.  Clearly, this was murder.

Superman 000c

Outside The Daily Planet, Clark Kent and Lois Lane stroll down the sidewalk and hear the news report blaring from the Daily Planet’s radio public address system which announces the guard has been killed and saboteurs are suspected.  How they came upon this suspicion is unknown but immediately…

Superman 000d

… both Clark and Lois decide this is a story.  She first, leaving Clark behind.  When Clark says this is probably a good story to cover, Lois is already gone.

Superman 01

It’s off to the Munition Works where we find Lois…

Superman 02

… applying for a job.  She meets the new security guard on the way in, a kindly old gent which, in the real world, would probably be about the right speed for a security guard.

Superman 03

Lois gets a job painting numbers on the sides of torpedoes which allows her to be around when…

Superman 04

… the foreman shows up and tells a couple of guys that Mr. Jones wants to see them at 12:00.

Superman 05

Mr. Jones, looking pretty smart with that cigarette holder, congratulates the boys on killing the first security guard.  He says they did a great job but since the radio already reported that saboteurs are suspected, which means the plant will be under increased scrutiny, I’d say they screwed up pretty badly but, no matter, he thinks they’re the bee’s knees.  Then they discuss the plan to blow up the plant.  Turns out, the switch for the lights is wired to explosives and the whole place will go when the new security guard switches on the lights for the night.

Superman 06

Lois is outside listening and is so incompetent, rather than duck below the window she stands right in front of it so her shadow can be easily observed.

Superman 07

She is quickly revealed, captured and tied up.  This happens to her so many times in this short series it can be fairly said that she is, quite simply, the worst eavesdropper in human history.  A game of hide and seek with her could be measured in milliseconds.  The seeker would count to ten, turn around, see Lois standing directly in front of him and say, “I see you.  You’re right there.  You didn’t even hide.”

Superman 08

For her stunning ineptitude, Lois is shoved into a torpedo which is then filled with explosives, even though it is supposed to be a dummy to be used in a test without explosives.  But they want to kill Lois and, for reasons unclear, they believe that slamming her into a ship at high speeds, underwater, while roped and gagged, won’t do the trick.  Nope, better blow the thing up just to be sure.

Superman 09

That’s when Gramps shows up.

Superman 10

He sees the whole thing but before he can do anything, a henchman drops tons of scrap metal on top of him.

Superman 11

Bye, bye, Gramps, you were as useless as you were uninteresting.

Superman 12

And away we go to the torpedo test range to kill Lois.

Superman 13

That’s the ship they’re going to slam her into.  Under water.  At high speeds.  But, again, let’s blow her up, too.  So I guess she’s doomed.

Superman 14

But wait!  The security guard wasn’t a doddering old fool!  It was Superman!  Now, this is important:  Remember, several tons of scrap metal couldn’t hurt him because he’s Superman.  That’s tons.   Okay, let’s just remember that for later.   Also, it’s pretty impressive how he managed to ditch the security guard getup and get into his Superman garb under all that metal.

Superman 15

So the torpedo gets fired and Superman takes off flying to stop it.

Superman 16

He shoots under the water like a bullet (a speeding bullet)…

Superman 17

… and emerges with the massive torpedo on his back which he safely flies away…

Superman 18

… landing on a dock and rescuing Lois from inside the shaft.

Superman 19

With Superman around, they decide to just blow the damn plant up now but Lois alerts Superman to the plan and…

Superman 20

… wham, take that jerk!

Superman 21

And now Superman gets into a protracted fight with the three henchmen.

Superman 22

They swing big tools at him and he ducks and bobs and weaves.  This Superman floats like a butterfly but, apparently, his punches don’t exactly sting like a bee.  You see, the henchmen keep coming back. Remember, it’s a protracted fight.  Between three mortals and a guy who can punch through iron.  A guy who isn’t hurt by several tons of scrap metal falling on him.  Remember that? That guy.  He’s having a hard time with these three plant workers.

Superman 23

Mr. Jones, on the other hand, is thinking, “Screw this noise,” and makes his way towards an explosives truck conveniently located at the top of a hill next to the plant.

Superman 24

And in he jumps, ready to the drive the truck into the plant.

Superman 25

But as he’s driving down the hill…

Superman 26

… Lois sees what he’s up to.

Superman 26a

Meanwhile, the guy who can fly into the sun, absorb the force of a mountain falling on him and safely belly flop into a pool of nitro-glycerin with no ill after-effects, is getting clocked repeatedly by Mr. Overalls.

Superman 26b

At last, Superman manages to dispose of the troublesome trio as the explosives truck hurtles headlong down the hill towards the plant.

Superman 26c

That’s it hurtling right there.  Headlong, no less.  Also, Mr. Jones has already jumped out so, clearly, he was confident that the truck’s aim was true.

Superman 27

Superman has torn out the light switch so no one can flip it only to have Lois yell to him about the truck because despite all his super abilities, he missed the big truck barreling down the hill right behind him.

Superman 28

Okay, now we’re going to see some real Superman action!  Look at him, he’s ready to fly.

Superman 29

And sure enough, that’s just what he does, right to the truck.  And since we saw how he manhandled that torpedo, we know exactly what he’s going to do:  He’s going to pick that truck up and put it down safely where it not only won’t hit the building but won’t blow up, period.

Superman 30

Except that… wait, what?  He gets in the truck and starts driving it.  So, I guess the dockworker had a stronger punch than anyone suspected because old Supe has clearly forgotten he can do things like pick up trucks and deposit them down safely somewhere else.

Superman 31

So, rather than trust the ability to get the truck to a safe place using his super powers, he takes the extraordinary risk of relying on the truck’s suspension system to handle the job and miss the building with a high-speed, almost right-angle turn at the last second.   I’m guessing his grades in that Logic class at Smallville High were pretty bad.

Superman 32

But it works and the truck misses but it’s going so fast…

Superman 33

… it goes off a cliff…

Superman 34

… and blows up.  The plant’s safe but anyone or anything under the cliff is a little worse for the wear right about now.

Superman 34a

But not Superman because he can fly and he’s indestructible, except against Mr. Overalls, of course.  That guy’s one tough cookie.

Superman 35

Which brings us to the end and our villains have been arrested and taken away.  That’s when Lois walks up to Gramps and reveals…

Superman 36

… that she knew it was Clark Kent all along.

Superman 37

And there he is, totally exposed.

So, to review – full makeup, wig and fake whiskers don’t fool Lois for a second but this…

Super to Kent 001

… to this…

Super to Kent 002

… is beyond her comprehension.

Of course, that’s probably the joke, or is it?

And there you have it.  The Superman cartoons of the early forties are still some of the most entertaining animated shorts ever produced.   The Fleischer Studio episodes are wonderful little sci-fi and fantasy adventures that come highly recommended.  But the Famous Studio shorts are amazing documents of American propaganda during wartime and should be watched with an eye towards history and an eyebrow arched towards the sky.  They’re available pretty much everywhere, from the Internet Archives to YouTube to Netflix Instant to cheap DVD compilations.   Hopefully, one day, they’ll get the full restoration treatment and their charms as well as their offenses, good intentions as well as awful prejudices, can be viewed and studied for years to come.   Documents of how propaganda works in wartime are not to be taken lightly and should be preserved for history even if takes a superhuman effort.

48 Responses Destruction, Inc. Deconstructed
Posted By jim vecchio : January 9, 2013 10:53 am

Thanks for the article! I always loved those SUPERMAN cartoons. They were so innocent, yet so creative! Today I feel writers and artists sacrifice creativity for insensitive graphic shock. Anyhow, back to the cartoons. In those “Golden Age Of Comics”, DC capitalized on the cartoon series by printing a story called “SUPERMAN IN CARTOONLAND”. In the story, Lois and Clark are in the theater watching a SUPERMAN cartoon. Every time SUPERMAN is shown in his secret identity as Clark, the “real” Clark diverts Lois’ attention so she won’t uncover his secret identity. This was reprinted again in the sixties in an annual and was undoubetedly also reprinted at other times. I rarely read DC anymore; I’m so sick of the way they refuse to stick to an original storyline but continually change their characters and origins to be politically correct.

Posted By jim vecchio : January 9, 2013 10:53 am

Thanks for the article! I always loved those SUPERMAN cartoons. They were so innocent, yet so creative! Today I feel writers and artists sacrifice creativity for insensitive graphic shock. Anyhow, back to the cartoons. In those “Golden Age Of Comics”, DC capitalized on the cartoon series by printing a story called “SUPERMAN IN CARTOONLAND”. In the story, Lois and Clark are in the theater watching a SUPERMAN cartoon. Every time SUPERMAN is shown in his secret identity as Clark, the “real” Clark diverts Lois’ attention so she won’t uncover his secret identity. This was reprinted again in the sixties in an annual and was undoubetedly also reprinted at other times. I rarely read DC anymore; I’m so sick of the way they refuse to stick to an original storyline but continually change their characters and origins to be politically correct.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 11:00 am

I rarely read DC anymore; I’m so sick of the way they refuse to stick to an original storyline but continually change their characters and origins to be politically correct.

Yeah, my brother started buying comics back in the mid-sixties and later I read through them (and sold a pile for a mint) and it was amazing to me looking at Batman from three different decades how many variations there were on his origin story. Sometimes he was home and found out about his parents’ death (they went to a costume party, dad dressed as a bat). Sometimes they got shot on the street in regular clothes and other times, Bruce was with them. Small variations, to be sure, but a constant reshuffling. I assume it’s done to tweak the story so I don’t mind as much but I haven’t read it in years so I don’t know if it’s gotten worse or better.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 11:00 am

I rarely read DC anymore; I’m so sick of the way they refuse to stick to an original storyline but continually change their characters and origins to be politically correct.

Yeah, my brother started buying comics back in the mid-sixties and later I read through them (and sold a pile for a mint) and it was amazing to me looking at Batman from three different decades how many variations there were on his origin story. Sometimes he was home and found out about his parents’ death (they went to a costume party, dad dressed as a bat). Sometimes they got shot on the street in regular clothes and other times, Bruce was with them. Small variations, to be sure, but a constant reshuffling. I assume it’s done to tweak the story so I don’t mind as much but I haven’t read it in years so I don’t know if it’s gotten worse or better.

Posted By Wednesday’s Child : January 9, 2013 11:40 am

Casper is my favorite Famous Studios series, and this article made me wonder if Casper contained propaganda too. So I went just now to YouTube and watched the first Casper short. Sure enough, when his brother and sister ghosts left the haunted mansion for the evening to go scare the neighbors, they flew in formation like war planes and then dive-bombed the city. Very interesting!

Posted By Wednesday’s Child : January 9, 2013 11:40 am

Casper is my favorite Famous Studios series, and this article made me wonder if Casper contained propaganda too. So I went just now to YouTube and watched the first Casper short. Sure enough, when his brother and sister ghosts left the haunted mansion for the evening to go scare the neighbors, they flew in formation like war planes and then dive-bombed the city. Very interesting!

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 11:55 am

Amazing where the propaganda found itself, isn’t it?

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 11:55 am

Amazing where the propaganda found itself, isn’t it?

Posted By Tony Dayoub : January 9, 2013 12:04 pm

“The Famous Studio shorts (as well as the Fleischer Studio shorts) are in the public domain, languishing and falling into washed-out disrepair. It’s a shame, really, because they deserve the full restorative treatment.”

Actually, I briefly looked at Warner’s DVD compilation “Max Fleischer’s SUPERMAN (1941-1942)” back in April 2009. As you can see from the screen capture at the top of my column (which you can click on to enlarge), Warner remastered the cartoons, reproducing them from their original film elements according to Amazon. So for those reluctant to spend money on poor quality versions, that edition (still not available on Blu-ray I believe) is worth buying.

Posted By Tony Dayoub : January 9, 2013 12:04 pm

“The Famous Studio shorts (as well as the Fleischer Studio shorts) are in the public domain, languishing and falling into washed-out disrepair. It’s a shame, really, because they deserve the full restorative treatment.”

Actually, I briefly looked at Warner’s DVD compilation “Max Fleischer’s SUPERMAN (1941-1942)” back in April 2009. As you can see from the screen capture at the top of my column (which you can click on to enlarge), Warner remastered the cartoons, reproducing them from their original film elements according to Amazon. So for those reluctant to spend money on poor quality versions, that edition (still not available on Blu-ray I believe) is worth buying.

Posted By Will P : January 9, 2013 12:19 pm

The cartoons are on Blu-ray — if you’re willing to buy the Blu-ray versions of “Superman The Movie” and “Superman II,” where they’re included among the bonus features. They’re split between the sets, though, so you’ll have to buy both. (Or pony up the dough for the giant set that includes everything.)

Posted By Will P : January 9, 2013 12:19 pm

The cartoons are on Blu-ray — if you’re willing to buy the Blu-ray versions of “Superman The Movie” and “Superman II,” where they’re included among the bonus features. They’re split between the sets, though, so you’ll have to buy both. (Or pony up the dough for the giant set that includes everything.)

Posted By James : January 9, 2013 12:37 pm

There is a stand-alone Blu Ray for the Fleischer cartoons, but it is not a Warner Brothers release, so it may come from different source materials (these are PD films, as noted):

http://www.amazon.com/Max-Fleischers-Superman-Collectors-Blu-ray/dp/B008IG0EHM/ref=sr_1_11?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1357749379&sr=1-11&keywords=superman

Posted By James : January 9, 2013 12:37 pm

There is a stand-alone Blu Ray for the Fleischer cartoons, but it is not a Warner Brothers release, so it may come from different source materials (these are PD films, as noted):

http://www.amazon.com/Max-Fleischers-Superman-Collectors-Blu-ray/dp/B008IG0EHM/ref=sr_1_11?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1357749379&sr=1-11&keywords=superman

Posted By Doug : January 9, 2013 3:07 pm

One thing I admired in the Fleischer’s Superman cartoons was how well they captured the characters of both Lois and Clark. She was a go-getter snooping out stories, and he was, well, mild mannered.
The set that James links to above is tempting…but I’d better be good.

Posted By Doug : January 9, 2013 3:07 pm

One thing I admired in the Fleischer’s Superman cartoons was how well they captured the characters of both Lois and Clark. She was a go-getter snooping out stories, and he was, well, mild mannered.
The set that James links to above is tempting…but I’d better be good.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 3:10 pm

Doug, I find the Fleischer ones to be much better stories. In fact, they’re great little sci-fi treats and enjoyable (seriously enjoyable) to an adult. But the Famous Studio ones are fascinating to me for the abrupt shift towards propaganda. This would be a top wish for me to get the full Criterion release.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 3:10 pm

Doug, I find the Fleischer ones to be much better stories. In fact, they’re great little sci-fi treats and enjoyable (seriously enjoyable) to an adult. But the Famous Studio ones are fascinating to me for the abrupt shift towards propaganda. This would be a top wish for me to get the full Criterion release.

Posted By Qalice : January 9, 2013 7:30 pm

I love how Mr. Jones’ cigarette holder is visual shorthand to tell us he No Damn Good. And that shorthand still works, because Tarantino just used it in Django Unchained!

Posted By Qalice : January 9, 2013 7:30 pm

I love how Mr. Jones’ cigarette holder is visual shorthand to tell us he No Damn Good. And that shorthand still works, because Tarantino just used it in Django Unchained!

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 7:35 pm

Ha, I loved that, too. Had to mention it. They really are a delightful mix of so many things, including good old fashioned archetype character portraits.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 7:35 pm

Ha, I loved that, too. Had to mention it. They really are a delightful mix of so many things, including good old fashioned archetype character portraits.

Posted By AL : January 9, 2013 7:36 pm

wow. THANK YOU for such a delightful 2013 Surprise!

Posted By AL : January 9, 2013 7:36 pm

wow. THANK YOU for such a delightful 2013 Surprise!

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 7:37 pm

Thanks, AL, didn’t know you were a Superman fan. These are great shorts to watch anytime.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 7:37 pm

Thanks, AL, didn’t know you were a Superman fan. These are great shorts to watch anytime.

Posted By Lou Lumenick : January 9, 2013 7:39 pm

Will, the cartoons included on the Blu-rays of the “Superman” features are in standard definition. This is the case for virtually all of the special features ported over from DVD to Warners’ Blu-ray releases.

Posted By Lou Lumenick : January 9, 2013 7:39 pm

Will, the cartoons included on the Blu-rays of the “Superman” features are in standard definition. This is the case for virtually all of the special features ported over from DVD to Warners’ Blu-ray releases.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 10:35 pm

Lou, James, Will and Tony: Wow, thanks, one and all, for the info and links. I wasn’t aware of the blu-ray but what I’d really like to see is a full Criterion release with notes, docs, etc. There aren’t many action animated shorts out there that have ever been able to match these, if any.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 9, 2013 10:35 pm

Lou, James, Will and Tony: Wow, thanks, one and all, for the info and links. I wasn’t aware of the blu-ray but what I’d really like to see is a full Criterion release with notes, docs, etc. There aren’t many action animated shorts out there that have ever been able to match these, if any.

Posted By m_Erocrush : January 10, 2013 12:26 am

While I get the wartime agitprop, the message that has always stood out to me is that Lois is NOT a lady and by extension not a role model little girls should aspire to. Every episode makes it clear that Lois is a selfish, scheming, mistrustful, dissembling, emasculating shrew who, despite her (mostly unjustified) self confidence, only succeeds in making bad situations worse and Superman’s job more difficult. It’s as if the writers took the worst on screen aspects of Bette Davis, Rosalind Russell and Vivien Leigh and melted them all down into one obnoxious caricature. I can imagine Margot Kidder studying these shorts.

Posted By m_Erocrush : January 10, 2013 12:26 am

While I get the wartime agitprop, the message that has always stood out to me is that Lois is NOT a lady and by extension not a role model little girls should aspire to. Every episode makes it clear that Lois is a selfish, scheming, mistrustful, dissembling, emasculating shrew who, despite her (mostly unjustified) self confidence, only succeeds in making bad situations worse and Superman’s job more difficult. It’s as if the writers took the worst on screen aspects of Bette Davis, Rosalind Russell and Vivien Leigh and melted them all down into one obnoxious caricature. I can imagine Margot Kidder studying these shorts.

Posted By Doug : January 10, 2013 2:05 am

re: cigarette holder-another classic(?)-”Dick Tracy” by Warren Beatty had Dick Van Dyke pitching his cigarette holder at the perfect angle to denote a villain.
I would love to see a movie of “Superman-Red Son” the short series showing what would have happened if Kal-El’s rocket had landed in Russia.
Back to the wartime propagandizing of Superman. A different world back then; after Pearl Harbor a Superman cartoon that wasn’t patriotic probably wouldn’t have done very well.
Greg, I’m guessing you had fun pulling those pictures.

Posted By Doug : January 10, 2013 2:05 am

re: cigarette holder-another classic(?)-”Dick Tracy” by Warren Beatty had Dick Van Dyke pitching his cigarette holder at the perfect angle to denote a villain.
I would love to see a movie of “Superman-Red Son” the short series showing what would have happened if Kal-El’s rocket had landed in Russia.
Back to the wartime propagandizing of Superman. A different world back then; after Pearl Harbor a Superman cartoon that wasn’t patriotic probably wouldn’t have done very well.
Greg, I’m guessing you had fun pulling those pictures.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 10, 2013 8:38 am

Every episode makes it clear that Lois is a selfish, scheming, mistrustful, dissembling, emasculating shrew who, despite her (mostly unjustified) self confidence, only succeeds in making bad situations worse and Superman’s job more difficult.

Yeah, that’s about right. Her self confidence is her most grating trait as it is, as you say, almost completely unjustified. Maybe completely. I don’t know, she must write some damn good copy that we never get to see.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 10, 2013 8:38 am

Every episode makes it clear that Lois is a selfish, scheming, mistrustful, dissembling, emasculating shrew who, despite her (mostly unjustified) self confidence, only succeeds in making bad situations worse and Superman’s job more difficult.

Yeah, that’s about right. Her self confidence is her most grating trait as it is, as you say, almost completely unjustified. Maybe completely. I don’t know, she must write some damn good copy that we never get to see.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 10, 2013 8:42 am

Doug, a movie of RED SON would be awesome. I hope someone latches onto that soon. And, yes, I love putting together these screen shots. Only problem was picking from so many great ones.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : January 10, 2013 8:42 am

Doug, a movie of RED SON would be awesome. I hope someone latches onto that soon. And, yes, I love putting together these screen shots. Only problem was picking from so many great ones.

Posted By swac44 : January 10, 2013 4:56 pm

Haven’t seen that blu-ray mentioned above, but reviews appear to be fairly mixed. I’m guessing the standard def versions of the restored toons from WB probably look better than the public domain blu-ray.

Posted By swac44 : January 10, 2013 4:56 pm

Haven’t seen that blu-ray mentioned above, but reviews appear to be fairly mixed. I’m guessing the standard def versions of the restored toons from WB probably look better than the public domain blu-ray.

Posted By Film Friday Weekly Roundup – The Oscar Complaints Edition – Pretty Clever FilmsPretty Clever Films : January 11, 2013 11:30 am

[...] Who needs a hero? The Movie Morlocks deconstruct Destruction, Inc. [...]

Posted By Film Friday Weekly Roundup – The Oscar Complaints Edition – Pretty Clever FilmsPretty Clever Films : January 11, 2013 11:30 am

[...] Who needs a hero? The Movie Morlocks deconstruct Destruction, Inc. [...]

Posted By anbrooks2013 : January 25, 2013 6:32 pm

They need to continue to play these for the next generation. They need more than just the usual Tom and Jerry.

Posted By anbrooks2013 : January 25, 2013 6:32 pm

They need to continue to play these for the next generation. They need more than just the usual Tom and Jerry.

Posted By robbushblog : January 3, 2014 6:07 pm

I can’t believe I never read this post until now. The Fleischer Superman cartoons are just about the greatest things ever submitted to celluloid. The switch to Famous Studios saw a decrease in the quality of the animation, but also saw increases in “comedy” and propaganda. Those aren’t necessarily bad things, especially for that time, but the difference in the quality of the cartoons is obvious. The Fleischer-produced shorts are superior. The famous shorts are still very entertaining though, and continued to bring the best onscreen representation of Superman to life.

Posted By robbushblog : January 3, 2014 6:08 pm

I would welcome a Criterion release too. I would pre-order the Blu-ray and actually set money aside for that.

Posted By gregferrara : January 3, 2014 6:42 pm

Well it’s about time you showed up!

Posted By robbushblog : January 3, 2014 6:43 pm

I KNOW!

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