Reconsidering Aldo Ray: Chapter Two

rayswimmerThis is the second part of my two piece article on actor Aldo Ray. The first part can be found here.

When THE MARRYING KIND was released in 1952 Aldo Ray was praised for his portrayal of a blue-collar man struggling to keep his fractured marriage together. Film critic Bosley Crowther singled out Ray’s performance in his review for The New York Times:

“…the big surprise of this picture is the talent of Mr. Ray in presenting a richly appealing and naturally complicated young man. Not handsome but sturdy in appearance, and possessed of a melting, husky voice, he has a gift for flowing humor and straight-faced pathos that is almost beyond belief. His winning performance of the husband is a great factor in this film.”
- Bosley Crowther (March 14, 1952)

Ray’s everyman quality earned him lots of fans and critical praise early in his career but it was hard won. During the film’s production director George Cuckor ordered Ray to take ballet lessons because he moved like a football player. Studio chief Harry Cohn also insisted that Aldo Ray (DeRa at the time) change his name to John Harrison but Ray refused to answer to his new name on set and was applauded by the film crew who backed his rebellious decision. The teamsters, who were proud of their own ethnic heritage, admired Ray’s determination to try and keep his distinctly Italian name intact. A compromise was eventually worked out and Aldo DeRa became Aldo Ray instead of John Harrison.

Problems seemed to follow the film after it was released. At the time the HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee) were holding hearings and Ray’s costar Judy Holliday was asked to testify about her political affiliations. Picketers stood outside of theaters showing THE MARRYING KIND carrying signs that read, “Judy Holliday is the Darling of the Daily Worker” so producer Harry Cohn and director George Cuckor decided to send Ray out to promote their movie alone. According to film critic Emanuel Levy, Aldo Ray toured 35 cities in 90 days using his all-American appeal to sway audiences into seeing the picture and it worked. Ray would go directly to theaters showing the movie and march into the protesting crowds to tell them they were wrong and shortsighted for picketing THE MARRYING KIND. His winning smile and easygoing manner seemed to ease the demonstrator’s apprehensions and they would often end up apologizing to Ray for their actions and asking for his autograph.

aldomCrockett’s Historical Museum – the C&H Sugar refinery where Aldo ray & his father worked can be seen behind it.

During my recent trip to the small town of Crockett (population 3,094 in 2010) where Aldo Ray grew up and eventually retired, I learned that Ray used the same charming qualities to win over locals. According to census records, Ray’s family moved to Crockett, CA around 1930 when he was just 4 years old. At the time the C&H Sugar refinery dominated the small seaside town and at least 70% of the local residents worked there. Ray’s family was no exception and his father spent most of life as an employee of C&H Sugar. Ray also worked for the company as a dock laborer after WW2 while he was attending college. Since then C&H Sugar has drastically cut its workforce and currently only about 1% of Crockett’s population is employed by the refinery. Much like the closed textile mill that Aldo Ray’s character tries to revive in the effective depression era drama GOD’S LITTLE ACRE (Anthony Mann; 1958), the beautiful old C&H Sugar building that once employed thousands now stands as a solemn reminder of Crockett’s prosperous past. In the shadow of the refinery sits the eccentric and quaint Crockett Historical Museum where you’ll find a small but heartfelt display celebrating the life of Aldo Ray. Glass cases house memories of Ray’s football heroics, the brief time he spent as the town’s constable and his noteworthy acting career. But if you really want to know more about Aldo Ray you’ve got to talk to historian Nancy Reiser who gladly shares everything she knows about the actor with museum visitors.

aldorm2
Part of the Aldo Ray exhibit at Crocket’s Historical Musuem.

Nancy Reiser had so many great stories to share that I had a hard time keeping up with her but her lively chatter and abundant enthusiasm was a welcome reminder that Aldo Ray had touched many lives during his time in Crockett. Ray attended Crockett’s longstanding John Swett High-School and according to locals his Italian mother was an incredible cook who often made meals for Ray’s football team. Groups of young men would congregate in Ray’s family kitchen to enjoy his mother’s homemade ravioli. Besides football, Ray was an avid swimmer who learned how to maneuver through rough waters while navigating the Carquinez Strait. When he joined the Navy in 1944 it didn’t surprise anyone that he became a frogman and as part of the Navy’s Underwater Demolition Team Ray participated in various WW2 military operations and saw action during the Battle of Okinawa.

aldoray6
aldom4Details of the museum’s Aldo Ray display.

Nancy also told me that Ray taught the kids in Crockett to swim when he returned home after the war and shared stories about Ray’s campaign to become the town constable. Ray’s general appeal and friendly nature seemed to have turned him into a local hero before he was a movie star. And although Ray was born with a healthy ego that occasionally may have clouded his judgment, he never let his Hollywood career go to his head. According to local film critic Edward Guthmann who interviewed Ray in 1986, Ray told him that, “Everybody said, ‘Behave like a star.’ I said, ‘What the f— is a star supposed to behave like? I’m me.” Ray often returned home to Crockett to see family and friends after he had made a name for himself in the City of Angels and during these return visits he was occasionally accompanied by a pretty starlet or two. Local kids who had grown up around Ray enjoyed following him through town while trying to catch a glimpse of the actresses he was entertaining. But Ray always had time to shake hands or sign autographs and his gracious disposition is still evident on the streets of Crockett today. Residents smile broadly when they recall Ray’s memory and there’s a genuine sense of pride that their local boy is still generating interest from classic movie buffs like myself. But all of the memories Ray left behind aren’t golden. As I was leaving Crockett’s Historical Museum an older gentlemen with a wistful look in his eye reminded me that Ray, “Liked to drink and he drank a lot.”

aldorbClub Tac, where Aldo and his brother Guido first read about auditions for SATURDAY’S HERO (1951). The bar was originally established in 1923 and is still open for business.

At Crockett’s What’s On Second Antique Shop owners Dennis and Joanne Dowell carry a large selection of Aldo Ray collectables including original film posters and promotional photos. The shop also recently provided the production team of THE MASTER (Paul Thomas Anderson; 2012) with many of historic props they used during filming and they generously offered to share their own stories about Aldo Ray. Dennis reminded me that Ray eventually returned to his childhood home in Crockett during his last years when his career in Hollywood had bottomed out. Ray’s career had been one of Harry Cohn’s pet projects and the two men got along famously because in Ray’s own words, “He (Harry Cohn) took no shit from anybody and he saw that I was that kind of a guy, too.” But when Cohn died in 1958, Columbia refused to renew Aldo Ray’s contract and he was left to his own devices. He had spent a decade working for some of Hollywood’s best director’s such as George Cuckor (THE MARRYING KIND; 1952 and PAT AND MIKE; 1952), Raoul Walsh (BATTLE CRY; 1955 and THE NAKED AND THE DEAD; 1958), Anthony Mann (MEN IN WAR; 1957 and GOD’S LITTLE ACRE; 1958), Michael Curtiz (WE’RE NO ANGELS; 1955) and Jacques Tourneur (NIGHTFALL; 1957) but without Cohn’s guidance and the help of skilled filmmakers who could shape Ray’s rough-hewn performances into screen gold, his career began to flounder. Ray struggled to find work throughout the ‘60s and ‘70s and ended up in many television productions. His macho war-worn persona had fallen out of fashion and he eventually lost his Studio Actors Guild card when he agreed to act in non-union films, including a porn film called SWEET SAVAGE (1979) which won him a Best Actor Award from the Adult Film Association of America although Ray kept his clothes on in the role and only had to deliver a few lines.

movieposter
One of the many original movie posters displayed in Crockett’s What’s On Second Antique Shop.

Aldo Ray spent his last years in Crockett until his lifelong smoking habit finally caught up to him. As I said in the first part of my Aldo Ray piece, nobody smoked a cigarette like Aldo Ray on screen. It was an utterly natural act done without any forethought and unfortunately that kind of devil-may-care approach to living eventually killed him. It was undoubtedly compounded by a life well lived although in his later years, Ray often expressed his dissatisfaction with the cards he’d been dealt and he never seemed completely capable of enjoying his accomplishments. Reflecting on his career in Hollywood, Ray told interviewer Edward Guthmann that, “Nothing really got better for me down there. And every woman I ran into had her right hand on my c— and her left hand on my wallet.”  Like many war veterans who struggle with depression as well as drinking problems and nicotine addiction, Ray couldn’t win every battle he fought. He died in 1991 at age 64 due to complications from throat cancer combined with a bad bout of pneumonia. Today it’s easy to overlook Ray’s early achievements and become nostalgic about what ‘might have been’ but that only diminishes the actor’s memory. Ray succeeded in a tough industry against all odds and the films he left behind are potent reminders of his natural talent as well as his larger than life personality.

aldorhouseAldo Ray’s family home in Crockett where he grew up and eventually retired.

aldoray001Aldo Ray with his proud family after becoming the constable of Crockett (1951).

You can catch two of the best films Aldo Ray appeared in during the 1960s on TCM next month. On Tuesday, January 15th TCM will air DEAD HEAT ON A MERRY-GO-ROUND (1966) followed by THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND (1960) as part of their ‘Great Capers’ line-up. Although these movies might not contain Ray’s most compelling performances, both are well worth a look if you’re an Aldo Ray fan and they should appeal to anyone who appreciates a good heist film.

Further reading:
- Aldo Ray at TCM
- New York Times Obituary for Aldo Ray
- Star Over the Strait: Crockett Constable Turn Hollywood Luminary
- Aldo Ray: Tarantino’s Anti-’Basterd’

Locations mentioned:
- Crockett Historical Society and Museum, 900 Loring Ave. Crockett, CA 94525
- C & H Sugar Company Inc. 830 Loring Ave. Crockett, CA 94525
- What’s On Second Antique Shop, 720 2nd Ave. Crockett, CA 94525
- Club Tac, 1336 Pomona St. Crockett, CA 94525

0 Response Reconsidering Aldo Ray: Chapter Two
Posted By swac44 : December 27, 2012 6:09 pm

Thanks for the look at all that Aldo Ray memorabilia! Having just watched God’s Little Acre, it’s intriguing to learn of the connection to Ray’s own factory town upbringing and the passion that lay beneath his character’s desire to get the local cotton mill up and running again. Looking forward to those two caper flicks, I remember liking Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round, mostly for a cool James Coburn performance and a bit part by a young Harrison Ford, but I’ll take another look at it for Aldo. Haven’t seen the other title, but I do love me a good heist movie.

Also I couldn’t help noticing that Club Tac bears a strange resemblance to Moe’s Tavern, but I guess every small town has a joint like that.

Posted By swac44 : December 27, 2012 6:09 pm

Thanks for the look at all that Aldo Ray memorabilia! Having just watched God’s Little Acre, it’s intriguing to learn of the connection to Ray’s own factory town upbringing and the passion that lay beneath his character’s desire to get the local cotton mill up and running again. Looking forward to those two caper flicks, I remember liking Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round, mostly for a cool James Coburn performance and a bit part by a young Harrison Ford, but I’ll take another look at it for Aldo. Haven’t seen the other title, but I do love me a good heist movie.

Also I couldn’t help noticing that Club Tac bears a strange resemblance to Moe’s Tavern, but I guess every small town has a joint like that.

Posted By Arthur : December 27, 2012 6:48 pm

Great insights into the man.

Posted By Arthur : December 27, 2012 6:48 pm

Great insights into the man.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 27, 2012 6:52 pm

swac – Thanks! I’ve got to assume that a lot of the emotions Ray was expressing in GOD’S LITTLE ACRE were linked to his own life growing up in a factory town. He really did know what his character was experiencing. As for Club Tac, it does resemble a thousand other bars in every American town but sadly, their disappearing quickly so I was glad to discover that Club Tac is still thriving.

Hope you enjoy THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND if you get a chance to see it. Ray plays an Irish/American in the film and his accent is a bit sketchy but I think he’s very good in it. I believe it also features Peter O’Toole in his very first film role.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 27, 2012 6:52 pm

swac – Thanks! I’ve got to assume that a lot of the emotions Ray was expressing in GOD’S LITTLE ACRE were linked to his own life growing up in a factory town. He really did know what his character was experiencing. As for Club Tac, it does resemble a thousand other bars in every American town but sadly, their disappearing quickly so I was glad to discover that Club Tac is still thriving.

Hope you enjoy THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND if you get a chance to see it. Ray plays an Irish/American in the film and his accent is a bit sketchy but I think he’s very good in it. I believe it also features Peter O’Toole in his very first film role.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 27, 2012 6:55 pm

Arthur – Glad you found the Aldo Ray piece interesting.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 27, 2012 6:55 pm

Arthur – Glad you found the Aldo Ray piece interesting.

Posted By Sergio : December 27, 2012 10:18 pm

I think The Day They Robbed the Bank of England is an absolute little gem of movie. I’ve seen it twice on TCM and would love to see it again. (It’s also Peter O’Toole first film role and he’s quite good in the film) Wouldn’t be surprised if it shows up as Warner Archive title soon

Posted By Sergio : December 27, 2012 10:18 pm

I think The Day They Robbed the Bank of England is an absolute little gem of movie. I’ve seen it twice on TCM and would love to see it again. (It’s also Peter O’Toole first film role and he’s quite good in the film) Wouldn’t be surprised if it shows up as Warner Archive title soon

Posted By Doug : December 28, 2012 3:44 am

Kimberly, thank you for the second post on Aldo Ray-he sounds like an original; I think many in Hollywood possibly felt as he did about “stardom”, but lacked the courage to say it out loud.
Sad to hear that his later years had him battling health issues-as I lost both my parents to illness two years ago, I appreciate how frail we can become.
That is a great picture of Ray putting on the flippers-thank you again for a fine post. I wouldn’t mind seeing a similar write-up about Eddie Albert.

Posted By Doug : December 28, 2012 3:44 am

Kimberly, thank you for the second post on Aldo Ray-he sounds like an original; I think many in Hollywood possibly felt as he did about “stardom”, but lacked the courage to say it out loud.
Sad to hear that his later years had him battling health issues-as I lost both my parents to illness two years ago, I appreciate how frail we can become.
That is a great picture of Ray putting on the flippers-thank you again for a fine post. I wouldn’t mind seeing a similar write-up about Eddie Albert.

Posted By sailorbob : December 28, 2012 11:05 am

The story of Aldo Ray is one of promising newcomer, typecasted ruffian, and eventually ending as thrown away has-been. He looked good in uniform and with his distinctive voice he could cover quite a spectrum of roles – working stiff, malevolent sargeant, lovestruck Marine, and shady gangster among others. It was painful to watch his demise appearing in awful films that were incoherant garbage – “Gone with the West”, “The Lucifer Complex”, culminating in his appearance in the porn-western “Sweet Savage”. He was mean’t for better things.

Posted By sailorbob : December 28, 2012 11:05 am

The story of Aldo Ray is one of promising newcomer, typecasted ruffian, and eventually ending as thrown away has-been. He looked good in uniform and with his distinctive voice he could cover quite a spectrum of roles – working stiff, malevolent sargeant, lovestruck Marine, and shady gangster among others. It was painful to watch his demise appearing in awful films that were incoherant garbage – “Gone with the West”, “The Lucifer Complex”, culminating in his appearance in the porn-western “Sweet Savage”. He was mean’t for better things.

Posted By Richard B : December 28, 2012 1:23 pm

When I was assignments editor at a TV station in El Paso, Texas in the early 1980′s, Aldo came to town promoting a low-budget effort called “Lethal Injection,” but unless it eventually was released under another title, IMDb has no recollection of it. All I can tell you was that our reporter was not impressed with him.

It does make one wonder, as I often do, how some actors whose careers started off so promisingly…here’s a guy who acted with Tracy & Hepburn and shared top billing with Bogart!…end up as they do. Not to further tarnish anyone’s image but “Sweet Savage” was not “softcore” whenever Ray was off-camera. That award will look a little out of place on your resume…

Posted By Richard B : December 28, 2012 1:23 pm

When I was assignments editor at a TV station in El Paso, Texas in the early 1980′s, Aldo came to town promoting a low-budget effort called “Lethal Injection,” but unless it eventually was released under another title, IMDb has no recollection of it. All I can tell you was that our reporter was not impressed with him.

It does make one wonder, as I often do, how some actors whose careers started off so promisingly…here’s a guy who acted with Tracy & Hepburn and shared top billing with Bogart!…end up as they do. Not to further tarnish anyone’s image but “Sweet Savage” was not “softcore” whenever Ray was off-camera. That award will look a little out of place on your resume…

Posted By Tom Nassisi : December 28, 2012 3:43 pm

Excellent article, and glad to see that Aldo Ray, like Kim Novak after him, fought Harry Cohn to hold on to at least some part of his real name.

My only quibble is with the sentence “Senator McCarthy was holding his infamous HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee) hearings.” McCarthy, because he was a Senator, had nothing to do with HUAC. He and his cohorts ran their own Senate investigation committee to ferret out Communists, mostly non-existent and/or imagined, from the government.

Posted By Tom Nassisi : December 28, 2012 3:43 pm

Excellent article, and glad to see that Aldo Ray, like Kim Novak after him, fought Harry Cohn to hold on to at least some part of his real name.

My only quibble is with the sentence “Senator McCarthy was holding his infamous HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee) hearings.” McCarthy, because he was a Senator, had nothing to do with HUAC. He and his cohorts ran their own Senate investigation committee to ferret out Communists, mostly non-existent and/or imagined, from the government.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:05 pm

Sergio – I’m glad someone else enjoys THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND too. It’s well worth a look if you’re a ray fan or just enjoy heist films.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:05 pm

Sergio – I’m glad someone else enjoys THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND too. It’s well worth a look if you’re a ray fan or just enjoy heist films.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:09 pm

Doug – Glad you enjoyed it, as for Eddie Albert, he sure was a fascinating guy! I only started learning about his background a year or two ago after coming across one of the albums he recorded. If inspiration strikes I may try to compile something about him in the future.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:09 pm

Doug – Glad you enjoyed it, as for Eddie Albert, he sure was a fascinating guy! I only started learning about his background a year or two ago after coming across one of the albums he recorded. If inspiration strikes I may try to compile something about him in the future.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:11 pm

sailorbob – I do wish Ray had been able to manage his career a bit better but I enjoy some of his later films even if they’re nowhere near the quality of his early work.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:11 pm

sailorbob – I do wish Ray had been able to manage his career a bit better but I enjoy some of his later films even if they’re nowhere near the quality of his early work.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:18 pm

Richard B – Thanks for sharing your own story about Ray. I suspect his disappointment & depression (compounded by hard drinking) must have made him hard to deal with on occasion. As for SWEET SAVAGE, I’ve never seen it myself but I was told it was ‘soft’ porn by one of Crockett’s locals but they might have been thinking of Ray’s scenes’.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:18 pm

Richard B – Thanks for sharing your own story about Ray. I suspect his disappointment & depression (compounded by hard drinking) must have made him hard to deal with on occasion. As for SWEET SAVAGE, I’ve never seen it myself but I was told it was ‘soft’ porn by one of Crockett’s locals but they might have been thinking of Ray’s scenes’.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:27 pm

Tom – Thanks a lot and I’m glad you brought up Kim Novak. It was typical of old Hollywood to try & strip any sign of ethnicity from their actors. As for my connecting Senator McCarthy to HUAC, you’re right. It was worded awkwardly and I’ll correct it. It’s easy to link McCarthy to HUAC although they weren’t directly related.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 28, 2012 4:27 pm

Tom – Thanks a lot and I’m glad you brought up Kim Novak. It was typical of old Hollywood to try & strip any sign of ethnicity from their actors. As for my connecting Senator McCarthy to HUAC, you’re right. It was worded awkwardly and I’ll correct it. It’s easy to link McCarthy to HUAC although they weren’t directly related.

Posted By Kingrat : December 28, 2012 5:08 pm

Kimberly, if I recall correctly, the biography GEORGE CUKOR: A DOUBLE LIFE includes interview material where Ray admits having granted certain favors to Cukor and says it was worth it for what Cukor did for his career.

At the end of THE MARRYING KIND is a shot of Aldo Ray with a legend that reads something like “We hope you have enjoyed our new personality Aldo Ray. Please look for his films in the future.” I’ve never seen anything else like that in a film.

Thank you for a most informative article. I agree that THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND is a very enjoyable film.

Posted By Kingrat : December 28, 2012 5:08 pm

Kimberly, if I recall correctly, the biography GEORGE CUKOR: A DOUBLE LIFE includes interview material where Ray admits having granted certain favors to Cukor and says it was worth it for what Cukor did for his career.

At the end of THE MARRYING KIND is a shot of Aldo Ray with a legend that reads something like “We hope you have enjoyed our new personality Aldo Ray. Please look for his films in the future.” I’ve never seen anything else like that in a film.

Thank you for a most informative article. I agree that THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND is a very enjoyable film.

Posted By Susan Doll : December 29, 2012 4:05 pm

So cool. I love investigating tiny museums like this. You learn so much about the local area and the people from an everyman’s point of view. I think Aldo Ray would have been pleased that he has a place at the Crockett Hist. Museum.

Posted By Susan Doll : December 29, 2012 4:05 pm

So cool. I love investigating tiny museums like this. You learn so much about the local area and the people from an everyman’s point of view. I think Aldo Ray would have been pleased that he has a place at the Crockett Hist. Museum.

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : December 30, 2012 12:16 pm

And Hope to Die will be available in January as a British DVD!

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : December 30, 2012 12:16 pm

And Hope to Die will be available in January as a British DVD!

Posted By morlockjeff : December 30, 2012 2:36 pm

Most directors and Hollywood casting people could probably only see Aldo Ray as a leading man in war or action movies. George Cukor certainly brought out a lighter, funnier and more sensitive side of him in PAT AND MIKE and THE MARRYING KIND. And Michael Curtiz gave him a welcome shot at comedy in WE’RE NO ANGELS. Too bad he got so few chances to play more roles like that instead of so many stereotypical villains or hard ass roles. Still, he often makes exploitation films like PSYCHIC KILLER and THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS more interesting by his mere presence.

Posted By morlockjeff : December 30, 2012 2:36 pm

Most directors and Hollywood casting people could probably only see Aldo Ray as a leading man in war or action movies. George Cukor certainly brought out a lighter, funnier and more sensitive side of him in PAT AND MIKE and THE MARRYING KIND. And Michael Curtiz gave him a welcome shot at comedy in WE’RE NO ANGELS. Too bad he got so few chances to play more roles like that instead of so many stereotypical villains or hard ass roles. Still, he often makes exploitation films like PSYCHIC KILLER and THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS more interesting by his mere presence.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:27 pm

Kingrat – I haven’t read that Cuckor bio but the claim sounds a bit dubious to me but anything’s possible of course. And I’m glad to see another positive vote for THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND. I hope people will give it a look when it airs on TCM in January.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:27 pm

Kingrat – I haven’t read that Cuckor bio but the claim sounds a bit dubious to me but anything’s possible of course. And I’m glad to see another positive vote for THE DAY THEY ROBBED THE BANK OF ENGLAND. I hope people will give it a look when it airs on TCM in January.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:29 pm

Susan – Thanks! Crockett is a really cute town and one of the Bay Area’s best hidden jewels.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:29 pm

Susan – Thanks! Crockett is a really cute town and one of the Bay Area’s best hidden jewels.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:32 pm

Peter – Good to know! The film is undervalued and has a great cast. It’s always time to celebrate when a René Clément film finds it’s way onto DVD.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:32 pm

Peter – Good to know! The film is undervalued and has a great cast. It’s always time to celebrate when a René Clément film finds it’s way onto DVD.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:40 pm

morlockjeff – It’s a shame that Ray wasn’t used as well as he could have been, but some of the later B (and C) films he appeared were really interesting, especially for genre fans. THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS and PSYCHIC KILLER are definitely worth a watch but for some reason I don’t remember Ray much in the later film. I’m going to have to watch it again and look for him. I saw PSYCHIC KILLER on video in the late ’80s so my memory of it is more than a little fuzzy.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : December 31, 2012 7:40 pm

morlockjeff – It’s a shame that Ray wasn’t used as well as he could have been, but some of the later B (and C) films he appeared were really interesting, especially for genre fans. THE CENTERFOLD GIRLS and PSYCHIC KILLER are definitely worth a watch but for some reason I don’t remember Ray much in the later film. I’m going to have to watch it again and look for him. I saw PSYCHIC KILLER on video in the late ’80s so my memory of it is more than a little fuzzy.

Posted By swac44 : January 7, 2013 8:58 am

An Aldo Ray title popped up today over at Trailers From Hell, the underrated Blake Edwards wartime comedy What Did You Do in the War Daddy?

http://trailersfromhell.com/trailers/990

Posted By swac44 : January 7, 2013 8:58 am

An Aldo Ray title popped up today over at Trailers From Hell, the underrated Blake Edwards wartime comedy What Did You Do in the War Daddy?

http://trailersfromhell.com/trailers/990

Posted By Sergio : January 7, 2013 2:44 pm

Yeah I saw that too and DAMN I had the DVD of it and I loaned it to someone and I never got it back. Now they’re charging $100 on Ebay for a copy. Learned my lesson, never again

Posted By Sergio : January 7, 2013 2:44 pm

Yeah I saw that too and DAMN I had the DVD of it and I loaned it to someone and I never got it back. Now they’re charging $100 on Ebay for a copy. Learned my lesson, never again

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