Son of Dracula’s Daughter!

As the boxer Sonny Liston used to say, “Life a funny thing.” If you squint real hard you can see, to the right of Robert Osborne and below the goldenrod banner that reads “Movie Morlocks Bloggers,” my name and the movie title DRACULA’S DAUGHTER (1936). I’ll be introducing the film tonight on TCM, sitting right there in the red chair, like you see all sorts of famous people do, and talking Universal horror and vampire movies, and gesturing with my hands, like an Italian. I was one of four Movie Morlocks chosen earlier this year to represent the writers for the TCM blog as official guest programmers, each of us charged with picking a movie that means the most to us. It wasn’t a hard choice on my part. Tonight’s broadcast completes a circuit that sparked for me nearly 40 years ago, when I was a young weirdo of 12 or so, late night TV showed tons of old movies, and life still held no end of boundless mystery.

Here’s how it began. Around 1972 or so, when I was a pre-teen MonsterKid living in my parents’ house in northeast Connecticut, Channel 4 out of Needham, Massachusetts, began running late night Friday-Saturday classic horror double features. I was at an age where my folks, who had been rearing kids by that point for a full decade, relaxed their standards a bit and gave me greater autonomy than they had my older sisters. I was allowed to stay up late on the weekends, as late as I wanted. The timing could not have been more perfect. Hosted by an offscreen “Uncle” George Fennell, CLASSIC HORROR was the old SHOCK THEATER package from the late 50s, Universal’s trendsetting fright films cranked out from 1931 until the genre petered out after World War II. At that early stage in the formation of my fear aesthetic, I was an avid reader of Famous Monsters of Filmland, a daily DARK SHADOWS viewer, and a student of the teachings of Hammer horror. Born in 1961, I had missed the classics and grew up on the movies that paid homage to and remade them. I had seen DRACULA HAS RISEN FROM THE GRAVE (1968) but not DRACULA (1931), FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969) but not FRANKENSTEIN (1931). All that changed with the first broadcast of CLASSIC HORROR. For three hours every Friday and Saturday midnight, I immersed myself in the seminal texts. I got myself up to speed very quickly over the course of two years, during which time the unseen Uncle George yielded to the horror hosted SIMON’S SANCTORUM. Sadly, I can remember only one of those double features, a pairing of THE INVISIBLE RAY (1936), an eerie science fiction serial killer flick starring Boris Karloff as an irradiated genius killing off a tick list of his enemies (among them Bela Lugosi), and DRACULA’S DAUGHTER, the first sequel to Tod Browning’s genre-sprouting classic. Both of these were, coincidentally, directed by Lambert Hillyer. A hard-working efficiency director whose career lasted forty years, Hillyer was known primarily for his Tom Mix, Buck Jones, Charles Starrett, and Johnny Mack Brown westerns. DRACULA’S DAUGHTER had been offered originally to James Whale but Whale wanted to put his back to horror and direct SHOWBOAT (1936) instead. Critics tend to write off Whale’s replacement as professional and perfunctory, but Hillyer did great work on these two undervalued genre classics, whose images and sounds have haunted me for four decades.

DRACULA’S DAUGHTER was one of the first TV broadcasts that I tape recorded, on a commercial cassette tape player/recorder that got a lot of use in our household. Back before most people had a home library of their favorite movies, when even VHS was ten years into an uncertain future, you either had to sit around and wait for them to replay on TV or turn up in a repertory cinema (of which there were, in my neck of the New England woods, approximately none). Or you got creative. I replayed that audio tape of DRACULA’S DAUGHTERS endlessly in my childhood bedroom, savoring every syllable of Garrett Fort’s ripe dialogue:

Unto Adoni and Aseroth, into the keeping of the lords of the flame and the lower pits, I consign this body, to be evermore consumed in this purging fire. Let all baleful spirits that threaten the souls of man be banished by the spilling of this salt. Be thou exorcised, O Dracula, and thy body long undead find destruction throughout eternity in the name of thy dark unholy master. In the name of the all holiest, and through this cross, be this evil spirit cast out until the end of time.

If you don’t know the story to DRACULA’S DAUGHTER, I’ll nutshell it for you. After Van Helsing’s (Edward van Sloan) destruction of the Undying Count at the end of the original film, Dracula’s offspring, the Countess Marya Zaleska (Gloria Holden), steals his body from the Whitby constabulary and burns it on a makeshift pyre in a bid to exorcise his influence upon her life. Yearning to be human, to be normal, she is thwarted by the machinations of her immortality-craving manservant Sandor (Irving Pichel) and her own infernal thirst. Seeking the aid of a London psychiatrist (Otto Kruger), Dracula’s daughter seems pointed toward a cure but, as any vampire worth his or her salt will tell you, unlife gets in the way.

Believe it or not, the person who first got the ball rolling on a DRACULA sequel was David O. Selznick, Mr. GONE WITH THE WIND (1939) himself. With the rights to Bram Stoker’s source novel tied up at Universal, Selznick bought an option on Stoker’s short story “Dracula’s Guest,” published posthumously. Bringing playwright John L. Balderston (who had adapted the novel for the stage) into his mad scheme, Selznick pitched a completely macabre, over-the-top, and patently grotesque follow-up, chock-a-block with sadomasochistic scenes of torture and bloodletting. Eventually, Selznick sold his interest to Universal, where James Whale was brought onboard. Disinterested, the sardonic director stirred the S&M pot, adding just enough homoeroticism to the mix to queer the deal with the censors. After Whale skipped merrily out of the picture, another director was brought in. Other writers were retained to bang out the treatment, actors were named in the trade papers, none of whom turned up in the picture. Months turned into years, the second director quit and Lambert Hillyer was brought in. When cameras rolled at long last, DRACULA’S DAUGHTER was already a small fortune in the red. Bela Lugosi made more money by not appearing in the film than he had for starring in DRACULA and all Universal got were some publicity photos that they couldn’t even use.

Maybe if DRACULA’S DAUGHTER hadn’t cost Universal so much money to make it would have had a better box office net. Mind you, it wasn’t a bomb, it just didn’t set the world on fire. Part of the problem was that horror was guttering at the studio. The Production Code, passed years earlier but slow in asserting itself, was finally exerting influence on movie content. Gone were the days of Bela Lugosi skinning Boris Karloff alive or Karloff crushing Lugosi in an industrial press. The grotesque was off the table and, though DRACULA’S DAUGHTER contained no moments of what you might call genuine horror, it would be the last horror film out of the Universal gate for several years. Over the decades, the film took something of a barracking from genre aficionados, dismissed as “disjointed” and second tier. In his 1966 overview Horrors!, Drake Douglas branded it “heavy, plodding, and dreary” while Alan Frank went so far as to say, in The Horror Film Handbook in 1982, that it was “totally unatmospheric.” Carlos Clarens was a dissenting voice in Horror Movies: An Illustrated Survey, calling DRACULA’S DAUGHTER “a serious, unpredictable horror film that, although lacking such distinguishing names as Karloff and Lugosi, did not deserve to go unnoticed as it did.” Clarens may have been the first critic to appreciate the lesbian undertones that would endear the film to a new generation of fans from the 1960s on, making it the Mother Hen of such Sapphic excursions as BLOOD AND ROSES (1965), THE VAMPIRE LOVERS (1970), THE VELVET VAMPIRE (1971), DAUGHTERS OF DARKNESS (1971), THE BLOOD SPATTERED BRIDE (1972) and… well, the list goes on and on. DRACULA’S DAUGHTER is innovative in other ways, too, offering as it does one of the first (if not the first) sympathetic vampire, whose torment and confusion live on in the genre today.

As transgressive and forward looking as DRACULA’S DAUGHTER may be, none of these factors was the reason I kept the film close to my heart for so long. Part of the appeal for me has everything to do with timing — it was simply one of the first Universal classic horror films I ever saw and if memory serves I saw it before I saw DRACULA, so I had no standard with which to compare it. In retrospect, if you stand the film alongside BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935), DRACULA’S DAUGHTER pales by comparison. DAUGHTER is small where BRIDE is big, quiet rather than over-the-top, and played straight rather than with James Whale’s customary (FRANKENSTEIN notwithstanding) sardonicry. There are no big moments… and I think that’s the charm for me. Some classics you remember highpoint by highpoint, with their little moments, the bridging scenes, the transitions, falling between the cracks like the toast crumbs that go down the gap between the kitchen counter and the stove. Pitched in a minor key, a chamber piece rather than a symphony of terrors, DRACULA’S DAUGHTER is all about oddly quiet moments that are suffused with the macabre: the discovery of Dracula’s corpse, Marya Zaleska’s bedazzlement of the policeman standing watch over the coffin, her cremation of her father’s remains, and her failed attempt to brighten her soul by sitting down at the piano.

What follows is the film’s best scene, as all of Marya’s optimistic, healing, life-affirming mental pictures are turned dark and disturbing by the Guignol innuendo of Sandor, who aspires to the very amoral immortality from which Marya flees . The dialogue between Holden and Pichel is priceless and their two diametrically opposed personalities could be seen to represent halves of the same divided mind, the one that seeks to create but desires to destroy, the one that hopes for the best and expects the worst, the one that staves off the inevitability of oblivion with fantasies of eternity. Though they are not romantically involved, Marya and Sandor are a great horror couple, so much more interesting than Edward and Bella or Sookie and Vampire Bill, and they don’t even need to get their kits off. I wonder if they could have been in any way an influence on Charles Addams in the creation of Morticia and Gomez.

DRACULA’S DAUGHTER allows me a glimpse into a world in which I want to live, though I know by the light of day the place would kill me. That’s the magic of the movies for you. I love the wet cobblestone streets of a pre-World War II London (albeit one faked on the Universal backlot), the garrets of Soho (where Marya and Sandor keep an artist’s studio/killing jar), the bookshop where Otto Kruger pretends to be a cop so he can extract information from the proprietor, the hospital where all of Marya Zaleska’s victims expire, the society drawing rooms, the home libraries, and even the Scottish hunting club (mocked up somewhere in the San Fernando Valley) from which Kruger’s acerbic hero is dragged to put DRACULA’S DAUGHTER into motion. The movie’s subdued approach gives me time and space to imagine myself in that world, tagging along with both protagonist and antagonist, a fly on the wall, an accomplice, an intimate. I fear that movies have lost the ability to include you in such a quiet way, so eager are they to sell you, market you, manipulate and blow you away. At age 51, I don’t really need or want to be blown away anymore. I’d rather be beguiled and charmed. DRACULA’S DAUGHTER does that for me and it was my honor to be asked by Turner Classic Movies to sit down with Robert Osborne and plead its case. I hope you’ll tune in tonight at 6:45 Pacific Standard Time, 9:45 Eastern Standard Time (I don’t know what the Carpathian Standard Time is but given that those people are often out at night I’m sure they’ve set their DVRs) to see the film (for the first or the nth time) and hear me talk about it. My fellow Morlocks Suzi Doll, Pablo Kjolseth, and Moira Neylon will be joining me and Robert for the evening and I think you’ll like the movies they have picked out as well. All hail the Movie Morlocks and the young muse Cinema!

0 Response Son of Dracula’s Daughter!
Posted By chris : November 30, 2012 5:56 am

Nice post. Being 52, I remember those late Saturday nights in the early 70′s with the Universal horror classics. In my nick of the woods, the local TV horror show was dubbed “Tales from the Tomb”. My favorites were always Frankenstein and The Mummy. However, my parents weren’t always as accommodating as yours; they would only allow me to stay up for the show on the occasional Saturday. A few of the others I had to sneak it.

Posted By chris : November 30, 2012 5:56 am

Nice post. Being 52, I remember those late Saturday nights in the early 70′s with the Universal horror classics. In my nick of the woods, the local TV horror show was dubbed “Tales from the Tomb”. My favorites were always Frankenstein and The Mummy. However, my parents weren’t always as accommodating as yours; they would only allow me to stay up for the show on the occasional Saturday. A few of the others I had to sneak it.

Posted By Bob Gutowski : November 30, 2012 11:43 am

I think DRAC’S DAUGHTER is a mucked-up movie, and the absence of any of the supporting cast from DRACULA, even in token appearances, is jarring, especially as the sequel is supposed to continue exactly where the first film left off. Still, when it’s good, it’s really, really good, such as in that piano scene and the very gay seduction of Lily (the “model”) by the Countess. I find both Dr. Garth and his snappy gal pal downright annoying. Lugosi’s brief appearance, via tapestry, is a comfort! Watching the film these days I am struck by how much Holden reminds me of songstress Celine Dion, who could sing, if not act, in a musical version of DRACULA’S DAUGHTER!

Posted By Bob Gutowski : November 30, 2012 11:43 am

I think DRAC’S DAUGHTER is a mucked-up movie, and the absence of any of the supporting cast from DRACULA, even in token appearances, is jarring, especially as the sequel is supposed to continue exactly where the first film left off. Still, when it’s good, it’s really, really good, such as in that piano scene and the very gay seduction of Lily (the “model”) by the Countess. I find both Dr. Garth and his snappy gal pal downright annoying. Lugosi’s brief appearance, via tapestry, is a comfort! Watching the film these days I am struck by how much Holden reminds me of songstress Celine Dion, who could sing, if not act, in a musical version of DRACULA’S DAUGHTER!

Posted By Jeffrey Ford : November 30, 2012 12:19 pm

Approaching 50 myself, my first memories of the Universal horrors were about 1975, when the New Haven CT station started showing them every Friday night. That’s where I first saw DRACULA, but if I remember correctly they never showed DRACULA’S DAUGHTER (just like they never showed GHOST OF FRANKENSTEIN, which always had me eager to find out just how the Monster got from that sulpher pit, to that castle basement filled with snow and ice). I had the good fortune to later (I think in 1998) see DRACULA and DRACULA’S DAUGHTER in a double bill at New York’s Film Forum. And I’m sure it will warm your heart to know that my beautiful wife liked the daughter better than she liked the old man (Lugosi is still the tops with me). Wonderful memories…

Posted By Jeffrey Ford : November 30, 2012 12:19 pm

Approaching 50 myself, my first memories of the Universal horrors were about 1975, when the New Haven CT station started showing them every Friday night. That’s where I first saw DRACULA, but if I remember correctly they never showed DRACULA’S DAUGHTER (just like they never showed GHOST OF FRANKENSTEIN, which always had me eager to find out just how the Monster got from that sulpher pit, to that castle basement filled with snow and ice). I had the good fortune to later (I think in 1998) see DRACULA and DRACULA’S DAUGHTER in a double bill at New York’s Film Forum. And I’m sure it will warm your heart to know that my beautiful wife liked the daughter better than she liked the old man (Lugosi is still the tops with me). Wonderful memories…

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : November 30, 2012 12:43 pm

The lack of DRACULA emeritus in DRACULA’S DAUGHTER never bothered me – but again, I believe I saw the sequel before the original, so my reaction to the Tod Browning picture back then may well have been “Who are all these people?”

Sometimes I like to imagine a female vampire movie of this vintage starring Holden, Anne Revere, and Gale Sondergaard. I get myself a little too worked up thinking about that.

And call me crazy but I love Otto Kruger and Marguerite Churchill in this. Kruger is a very different kind of horror movie hero and his brusqueness is actually very Peter Cushing-like, in my not so horrible opinion.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : November 30, 2012 12:43 pm

The lack of DRACULA emeritus in DRACULA’S DAUGHTER never bothered me – but again, I believe I saw the sequel before the original, so my reaction to the Tod Browning picture back then may well have been “Who are all these people?”

Sometimes I like to imagine a female vampire movie of this vintage starring Holden, Anne Revere, and Gale Sondergaard. I get myself a little too worked up thinking about that.

And call me crazy but I love Otto Kruger and Marguerite Churchill in this. Kruger is a very different kind of horror movie hero and his brusqueness is actually very Peter Cushing-like, in my not so horrible opinion.

Posted By TCM Programming News « CINEBEATS : November 30, 2012 2:34 pm

[...] – Doll, Author Of Ghost Stories Book, Will Co-Host Movie: An interview with Morlock Suzi Doll. – Son of Dracula’s Daughter: Richard H. Smith gives his personal take on the film he selected tonight, DRACULA’S [...]

Posted By TCM Programming News « CINEBEATS : November 30, 2012 2:34 pm

[...] – Doll, Author Of Ghost Stories Book, Will Co-Host Movie: An interview with Morlock Suzi Doll. – Son of Dracula’s Daughter: Richard H. Smith gives his personal take on the film he selected tonight, DRACULA’S [...]

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : November 30, 2012 3:13 pm

Love this film and love your post. Can’t wait to see you introduce it tonight.

I like to imagine a female vampire movie of this vintage starring Holden, Anne Revere, and Gale Sondergaard.

Sign me up for that!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : November 30, 2012 3:13 pm

Love this film and love your post. Can’t wait to see you introduce it tonight.

I like to imagine a female vampire movie of this vintage starring Holden, Anne Revere, and Gale Sondergaard.

Sign me up for that!

Posted By Jenni : November 30, 2012 4:04 pm

Got the TiVo all set up to record. I think it a great idea that TCM asked some of the Movie Morlocks to be guest programmers. I was wondering if you ever thanked your folks for letting you stay up and watch all of those classic horror films?

Posted By Jenni : November 30, 2012 4:04 pm

Got the TiVo all set up to record. I think it a great idea that TCM asked some of the Movie Morlocks to be guest programmers. I was wondering if you ever thanked your folks for letting you stay up and watch all of those classic horror films?

Posted By Susan Doll : November 30, 2012 4:27 pm

I have not seen this movie in a long time, so it will be exciting to see it under the circumstances for many reasons.

Posted By Susan Doll : November 30, 2012 4:27 pm

I have not seen this movie in a long time, so it will be exciting to see it under the circumstances for many reasons.

Posted By George J. Assad : November 30, 2012 10:51 pm

I LOVE Bela Lugosi & DRACULA flicks!

Posted By George J. Assad : November 30, 2012 10:51 pm

I LOVE Bela Lugosi & DRACULA flicks!

Posted By mErocrush : November 30, 2012 11:07 pm

As much as I like this film, I confess to objections to some of the plot. The faux-screwball relationship between Dr. Garth and his assistant is hard to take, especially when Countess Zaleska is so much more appealing in every way to the assistant/love interest. It also would have been nice if the authorities hadn’t been portrayed as bumbling cockney simpletons. Everybody in the film knows what’s going on but them. Even with those complaints, Gloria Holden’s bittersweet performance is riveting. You never stop rooting for her even as you know the ritual requires her to Pay at the end. At least they let her stay beautiful once she’s staked.

Posted By mErocrush : November 30, 2012 11:07 pm

As much as I like this film, I confess to objections to some of the plot. The faux-screwball relationship between Dr. Garth and his assistant is hard to take, especially when Countess Zaleska is so much more appealing in every way to the assistant/love interest. It also would have been nice if the authorities hadn’t been portrayed as bumbling cockney simpletons. Everybody in the film knows what’s going on but them. Even with those complaints, Gloria Holden’s bittersweet performance is riveting. You never stop rooting for her even as you know the ritual requires her to Pay at the end. At least they let her stay beautiful once she’s staked.

Posted By Brighton Rocker : November 30, 2012 11:13 pm

Hey…was that hypno ring ripped by Tim Burton in MARS ATTACKS ?
just wondering

Posted By Brighton Rocker : November 30, 2012 11:13 pm

Hey…was that hypno ring ripped by Tim Burton in MARS ATTACKS ?
just wondering

Posted By Christopher Barbour : December 1, 2012 12:50 am

I can’t help but wonder if DRACULA’S DAUGHTER influenced Richard Blackburn’s LEMORA-A CHILD’S TALE OF THE SUPERNATURAL with the mention of Asteroth., and Countess Zaleska’s first appearance in her black cape looking eerily similar to the late Lesley Gilb Taplin in LEMORA. What a treat to see this film again…there was no more beautiful or potent scene in all of Universal horror than the Countess’ final farewell to her father. Thank you for bringing this film back Richard, dare I say from the dead.

Posted By Christopher Barbour : December 1, 2012 12:50 am

I can’t help but wonder if DRACULA’S DAUGHTER influenced Richard Blackburn’s LEMORA-A CHILD’S TALE OF THE SUPERNATURAL with the mention of Asteroth., and Countess Zaleska’s first appearance in her black cape looking eerily similar to the late Lesley Gilb Taplin in LEMORA. What a treat to see this film again…there was no more beautiful or potent scene in all of Universal horror than the Countess’ final farewell to her father. Thank you for bringing this film back Richard, dare I say from the dead.

Posted By Debs : December 1, 2012 2:42 am

What a great night on TCM….I’ve never seen Dracula’s Daughter before, I really enjoyed the film. It was great fun to watch, I’m glad you picked it Richard. I’m currently watching Pablo’s pic Five Million Years to Earth. I’m looking forward to more evenings like tonight….Thanks.

Posted By Debs : December 1, 2012 2:42 am

What a great night on TCM….I’ve never seen Dracula’s Daughter before, I really enjoyed the film. It was great fun to watch, I’m glad you picked it Richard. I’m currently watching Pablo’s pic Five Million Years to Earth. I’m looking forward to more evenings like tonight….Thanks.

Posted By Bill Timoney : December 1, 2012 8:53 am

Richard, you gave an A+ presentation on TCM last night! You came across as enthusiastic, confident, and calm – not an “Italian hand gesture” in sight. I knew nothing of the Movie Morlocks until Mr. Osborne informed me of them last night, and now I’m a fan. My thanks to you and your fellow morlocks for your contributions to this vastly rewarding site!

Posted By Bill Timoney : December 1, 2012 8:53 am

Richard, you gave an A+ presentation on TCM last night! You came across as enthusiastic, confident, and calm – not an “Italian hand gesture” in sight. I knew nothing of the Movie Morlocks until Mr. Osborne informed me of them last night, and now I’m a fan. My thanks to you and your fellow morlocks for your contributions to this vastly rewarding site!

Posted By moirafinnie : December 1, 2012 2:38 pm

Seeing this movie introduced so drolly by you and described so vividly here made me smile all through the airing of DRACULA’S DAUGHTER last night. I had forgotten how fervently Irving Pichel’s ghoulish, waxy-looking manservant had longed for Gloria Holden’s unblinking gaze to envelope him lovingly. I kept wondering which one of them was really part of the Host of the Undead (him or her?). Thanks for the background info on this film’s production and another glimpse into the education of a monsterkid.

With your wit and aplomb, you should host a weekly show on these “ghastly” movies.

Posted By moirafinnie : December 1, 2012 2:38 pm

Seeing this movie introduced so drolly by you and described so vividly here made me smile all through the airing of DRACULA’S DAUGHTER last night. I had forgotten how fervently Irving Pichel’s ghoulish, waxy-looking manservant had longed for Gloria Holden’s unblinking gaze to envelope him lovingly. I kept wondering which one of them was really part of the Host of the Undead (him or her?). Thanks for the background info on this film’s production and another glimpse into the education of a monsterkid.

With your wit and aplomb, you should host a weekly show on these “ghastly” movies.

Posted By Liam Casey : December 1, 2012 10:38 pm

Having “Dracula The Legacy Collection” on my DVD shelves, I watched last night’s showing of “Dracula’s Daughter” for the sole purpose of putting a face to one of the bloggers whose writings I have come to enjoy. And I equally enjoyed your commentary last night.

In the same ballpark agewise, my education with Universal horror movies began with WGN’s “Creature Features” and “Famous Monsters of Filmland” magazine. And, in the same spirit of catching these films out of order, the first one that I saw was “Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man”. So I started off with no idea as to why Larry Talbot was in a coffin and the monster was on ice. But I learned.

Posted By Liam Casey : December 1, 2012 10:38 pm

Having “Dracula The Legacy Collection” on my DVD shelves, I watched last night’s showing of “Dracula’s Daughter” for the sole purpose of putting a face to one of the bloggers whose writings I have come to enjoy. And I equally enjoyed your commentary last night.

In the same ballpark agewise, my education with Universal horror movies began with WGN’s “Creature Features” and “Famous Monsters of Filmland” magazine. And, in the same spirit of catching these films out of order, the first one that I saw was “Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man”. So I started off with no idea as to why Larry Talbot was in a coffin and the monster was on ice. But I learned.

Posted By alan aperlo : December 1, 2012 11:39 pm

This 1936 film Dracula’s daughter is a great film. I saw it inthe 60s on tv 5 out here in LA. Great to see one more time.

Posted By alan aperlo : December 1, 2012 11:39 pm

This 1936 film Dracula’s daughter is a great film. I saw it inthe 60s on tv 5 out here in LA. Great to see one more time.

Posted By Doug : December 2, 2012 3:41 pm

On the strength of this post I ordered “Dracula The legacy collection” yesterday-and last night I watched the first half of
“The Fellowship of the Ring” extended version on Bluray. I bring this up to point out what wonderful times we are living in, where we can sit in our own homes and sample both 80 year old movies and recent classics on largish screens.
When I first bought a (used-$250.00) VCR I had to travel 25 miles to another city to rent tapes.
Now, of course, with streaming, even DVDs are seeing their sunset.
Wonderful times.

Posted By Doug : December 2, 2012 3:41 pm

On the strength of this post I ordered “Dracula The legacy collection” yesterday-and last night I watched the first half of
“The Fellowship of the Ring” extended version on Bluray. I bring this up to point out what wonderful times we are living in, where we can sit in our own homes and sample both 80 year old movies and recent classics on largish screens.
When I first bought a (used-$250.00) VCR I had to travel 25 miles to another city to rent tapes.
Now, of course, with streaming, even DVDs are seeing their sunset.
Wonderful times.

Posted By swac44 : December 3, 2012 10:35 am

It was great to see you on my home screen Richard, after reading you in Video Watchdog and here on Movie Morlocks for so many years. I thought it was a great intro, and I love the stories about catching these films on TV (I first saw a lot of them in a similar package in the ’70s, via cable out of Bangor with host Eddie Driscoll on WLBZ-TV, I’m sure Stephen King was up late watching them too). Too bad you weren’t able to impart the bit about recording them on audio cassette, I used to do the same thing, only with episodes of Monty Python on PBS, much to the chagrin of my parents who quickly tired of The Parrot Sketch over and over).

As for Morticia, I always thought she was inspired by Carroll Borland in Browning’s Mark of the Vampire, but Gloria Holden’s Contessa sure does seem echoed by Lily Munster (and my love of The Munsters at dawn of my TV watching days is definitely where my monster movie addiction stems from).

Posted By swac44 : December 3, 2012 10:35 am

It was great to see you on my home screen Richard, after reading you in Video Watchdog and here on Movie Morlocks for so many years. I thought it was a great intro, and I love the stories about catching these films on TV (I first saw a lot of them in a similar package in the ’70s, via cable out of Bangor with host Eddie Driscoll on WLBZ-TV, I’m sure Stephen King was up late watching them too). Too bad you weren’t able to impart the bit about recording them on audio cassette, I used to do the same thing, only with episodes of Monty Python on PBS, much to the chagrin of my parents who quickly tired of The Parrot Sketch over and over).

As for Morticia, I always thought she was inspired by Carroll Borland in Browning’s Mark of the Vampire, but Gloria Holden’s Contessa sure does seem echoed by Lily Munster (and my love of The Munsters at dawn of my TV watching days is definitely where my monster movie addiction stems from).

Posted By swac44 : December 3, 2012 10:39 am

Also meant to ask if anyone was familiar with Gloria Holden from any other roles? I know I’ve seen Wife vs. Secretary and The Hucksters, but it’s been years and I don’t have any strong memories of her in those films. I see she also worked with Tod Browning on his final feature, Miracles for Sale, but I haven’t had the chance to see it, although it’s plot about a magician seems like typical Browning subject matter. Hopefully it turns up on TCM one of these days.

Posted By swac44 : December 3, 2012 10:39 am

Also meant to ask if anyone was familiar with Gloria Holden from any other roles? I know I’ve seen Wife vs. Secretary and The Hucksters, but it’s been years and I don’t have any strong memories of her in those films. I see she also worked with Tod Browning on his final feature, Miracles for Sale, but I haven’t had the chance to see it, although it’s plot about a magician seems like typical Browning subject matter. Hopefully it turns up on TCM one of these days.

Posted By Jorge : December 6, 2012 4:33 pm

Thank you for putting these up. The Blues Fantastique video only seems to last a sconed, but the rest work great, and how! My wood and string contraption burst into green fire.

Posted By Jorge : December 6, 2012 4:33 pm

Thank you for putting these up. The Blues Fantastique video only seems to last a sconed, but the rest work great, and how! My wood and string contraption burst into green fire.

Posted By TK : December 6, 2012 6:33 pm

Different kind of early horror film indeed. It brings back fond memories of The Fright Night Late Show on WKBW-TV in Buffalo, NY. They aired a twin feature with horror and sci-fi titles. It started on late Saturday evenings in 1965 following the news and a bit later switched to Friday evenings until around 1969 or 70. Adam Keefe(made up to look like Dracula)was the host for the first movie for a couple years before leaving. I remember the first couple times “Dracula’s Daughter” was on as the first feature, “The She Creature” and “Stranglers Of Bombay” were the second features.

Posted By TK : December 6, 2012 6:33 pm

Different kind of early horror film indeed. It brings back fond memories of The Fright Night Late Show on WKBW-TV in Buffalo, NY. They aired a twin feature with horror and sci-fi titles. It started on late Saturday evenings in 1965 following the news and a bit later switched to Friday evenings until around 1969 or 70. Adam Keefe(made up to look like Dracula)was the host for the first movie for a couple years before leaving. I remember the first couple times “Dracula’s Daughter” was on as the first feature, “The She Creature” and “Stranglers Of Bombay” were the second features.

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