I like big bats (and I cannot lie)!

For my admittedly singular tastes, the vampire bat (there are other kinds?) is as essential a herald of Halloween as the old witch, the black cat, the Jack-o-lantern, and the scarecrow. As a kid, I loved the sudden appearance of a flapping vampire bat and the bigger and more leathery the beastie the better. Take this barrel-like example from Hammer’s BRIDES OF DRACULA (1961) — it’s like a rumpy Manx with wings — but I love it, I want to hug it, I want to bring it home and ask my mom if I can keep it. I miss bats in horror movies. How did we ever get it into our heads that we could live without them?

It was Bram Stoker who floated the conceit that vampires could turn themselves into bats; so hardwired was the immortal Count’s connection to bats that Stoker even depicted the old blighter crawling, bat-like, down the stony facade of Castle Dracula. Bat participation in Tod Browning’s DRACULA (1931), the first authorized adaptation of the 1897 Stoker novel, is however so noncommittal and fleeting that it’s almost subliminal, leaving the viewer with the uncertainty as to whethr protagonists David Manners and Helen Chandler have had a close encounter with Dracula himself in bat form or just a wayward sparrow. Yet despite Universal’s diffidence on the subject, bats had true Gothic cachet in the early years of the horror film. Pre-DRACULA, Roland West (by way of the Broadway play by Mary Roberts Rhinehart and Avery Hopwood) made a master criminal of THE BAT (1926) and choked the frame with batty bric-a-brac; he remade the film after the advent of sound as THE BAT WHISPERS (1930) but again the supernatural was purely a smokescreen for human avarice and malice aforethought. Out of this exchange, it is generally accepted, we got Bob Kane’s superhero avenger The Batman, whose own cinematic credibility continues to generate revenue to this day. But I digress. Back to the 1930s…

As if picking up Universal’s bat slack, Majestic Pictures offered THE VAMPIRE BAT (1933), a product of Poverty Row employing ringers from First National’s DOCTOR X (1932) and sets left over from  FRANKENSTEIN (1931) and THE OLD DARK HOUSE (1932). You get to see a real bat in this, close up, but the vampirism is attributed in the final analysis to natural rather than supernatural causes. Still, the vampire bat received prominent placement in the ad campaign, cementing in the minds of moviegoers the association of horror movies with bats. When Universal phased out Bela Lugosi as Dracula in favor of Lon Chaney, Jr. for SON OF DRACULA (1943), special effects whiz John P. Fulton depicted Chaney metamorphosing from bat to man — the first time the effect had ever been shown on screen. The gag was retained for John Carradine’s two at-bats (sorry) as Dracula for the studio in HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1944) and HOUSE OF DRACULA (1945). When Lugosi stepped back into the opera cape and celluloid collar of his immortal creation for ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948), he got to play along, albeit briefly, in the film’s slam-bang, rock’em/sock’em finale.

I mean, look at that beauty, c’mon! Haven’t you missed vampire bats? Isn’t that precisely what is wrong and boring about the TWILIGHT movies and TRUE BLOOD  and every other banal and trendy vampire story over the last, eh, thirty years? Sure, Dan Curtis’ THE NIGHT STALKER (1972) telefilm was novel for its depiction of an immortal bloodsucker who has to get around by station wagon — it brilliantly butted the European vampire mythos up against America’s awakening understanding of the methods of serial predators and made its bogey as pathetic as he was genuinely fearsome – but look at the fallout. THE VAMPIRE DIARIES! Couldn’t you kill?

There was a big old fat bat in Tod Browning’s MARK OF THE VAMPIRE (1935), seen early on for a cheap, fun scare. Later in the film, Carroll Borland (as Luna, a vampire girl) transforms in flight from a bat into Carroll Borland via a nifty little process shot achieved by Tom Tutwiler and cinematographer James Wong Howe. And standing smack dab in the middle of this silly but enjoyable MGM production is Bela Lugosi, providing an over easy riff on his most famous onscreen creation. Lugosi was back in the bat trade five years later for THE DEVIL BAT (1940), as a bitter old alte kaker who has nurtured bred a bat the size of a sleeping bag to be the instrument of his revenge upon a supporting cast of potential victims. I don’t know if big, fat bats ever got a fairer shake at the movies than in THE DEVIL BAT, where the creature in question is frequently dropping out of the sky to bite out an unsuspecting jugular. Understandably, bats featured squarely in the publicity campaign for the Producer’s Releasing Corporation release, as they did for the sequel, DEVIL BAT’S DAUGHTER (1946), which made do without Lugosi and giant bats. Oh, there are bats to be soon, albeit shunted off to the margins and relegated for the most part to a nightmare fantasia… which is of course not a proper substitute for the real thing.

Mario Bava included a fat bat in his first solo outing as a horror film director, LA MASCHERA DEL DEMONIO (BLACK SUNDAY, 1960) but it was really Hammer Studios up in the United Kingdom who put the species back on the genre map. Bava’s bat (barely seen and communicated mostly by shadow and synecdoche) was flown in merely as a matter of plot expediency, to force a character to flail about and destroy the ceremonial cross holding vampire Barbara Steele in her tomb. In BRIDES OF DRACULA however, the bat (arguably the undead Baron Meinster in rodent form but possibly just a familiar) stamps the terra, knocking Peter Cushing’s customarily prepared and proactive Van Helsing right on his keister… and is never punished directly for the offense! Bats played a key role as well lin Hammer’s THE KISS OF THE VAMPIRE (1963), actually wielded against the film’s resident savant (Clifford Evans) against the vampires — a plot point cribbed from the jettisoned finale of BRIDES OF DRACULA. Hammer’s in-house Dracula, Christopher Lee, generally shied away from any association with bats — perhaps he thought it undignified — but in the later sequel, SCARS OF DRACULA (1970), the fat bat is back, not only to revive Dracula from dusty death but to slaughter a whole church full of parishioners. How bat-ass is that?!

There was a sea change within the horror genre as the Sixties yielded to the Seventies. The success of PSYCHO (1960), ROSEMARY’S BABY (1968), and NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) created a demand for more tenable horrors, for mundane modern settings, and an overall eschewing of Gothic curliques in favor of the Nightmare Next Door. As the genre was redefined by such popular hits as THE EXORCIST (1973), THE TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE (1974), and THE OMEN (1976), vampire bats were largely shown the door, at least the fat ones. Bats continued to work their way into the game but they got smaller and smaller, even when they caused human beings to turn into THE BAT PEOPLE (1974). Bats were the villains of CHOSEN SURVIVORS (1974) and NIGHTWING (1979) and used as a mechanism of Biblical retribution in THE ABOMINABLE DR. PHIBES (1970) but they were piddly little things, just a jump up from the killer bees of THE SWARM (1978), the intelligent ants of PHASE IV (1974), the hookworms of SQUIRM (1976) and the tarantulas of KINGDOM OF THE SPIDERS (1977). Flash forward thirty years and not much has changed. When bats do pop up in horror movies, as in BATS (1999) or THE ROOST (2004), they’re still downsized, scientifically accurate, normal, dull, and lethal only by dint of volume, volume, volume. And they never look as though they were made out of an old wet suit. And that’s called sad.

If bats were in the main conspicuous in the absence from horror movies from the Seventies on they still made appearances in other media. In Marvel Comics’ mighty-mighty Tomb of Dracula series, the Count often transformed into a bat to elude his enemies, with no discernable loss of stature, and the same was true of Henry Polic II’s repurposed revenant in the Saturday morning kiddie show THE MONSTER SQUAD. Bats were often seen in horror-themed cartoons as well, on THE GROOVIE GHOULIES, SCOOBY DOO WHERE ARE YOU! and even SESAME STREET, where Count von Count urged us to do “The Batty Bat.”

And no redblooded American boy who read comic books or Famous Monsters of Filmland during the Nixon administration could pass up the opportunity to send away for a mail order bat of his very own, especially a “life size” vampire bat that you could control to do your bidding! For a buck! Yeah, the Guarantee Company of Chicago, Illinois, had my allowance money before the ink was even dry on the advertisement.

Rattles windows with Terrifying, Loud, Creepy Sounds!

Climbs, Crawls, Dances, Jumps, Floats in air!

Eyes Glow Eerily in the Dark!

I imagined a fat bat just like the one in BRIDES OF DRACULA, with the pleather wings and the glowing eyes. It was remote controlled, of course, and squeaked like a proper vampire bat and maybe there was even a little burning smell as the wheels and cogs turned within and the thing did its black magic in the air above the heads of my horrified sisters. I was psyched, I was pumped, I was jazzed… I was had! I was wholly unprepared for the pathetic lump of molded rubber that arrived in the mail some weeks later attached to a piece of elastic string, with which I was encouraged to dangle the bat over the transom or hang it from the rafters. It was 1975 – nobody had transoms and rafters anymore, we all lived in raised ranches. Man, I got screwed. Nearly forty years later and I still feel the pain. (Yeah, I know, technically the Guarantee Company told the truth — vampire bats really are tiny but that thing did nothing at my command I had to do all the work. Who did they think I was, Bill Baird?) My bad experience certainly did not put me off of bats, oh no no no. I’m a lifer. Last Halloween I cut out a dozen or so construction paper bats and hung them on a mobile over my daughter’s bed… and it’s still there. My wife and I priced rubber vampire bats this year weeks in advance of the Halloween season but we never found one sturdy enough for our liking, so we’re going batless in 2012 because, as far as bats are concerned, it’s either go big or go fish.

0 Response I like big bats (and I cannot lie)!
Posted By Jeb : October 12, 2012 1:34 pm
Posted By Jeb : October 12, 2012 1:34 pm
Posted By Bob Gutowski : October 12, 2012 1:49 pm

You’re preaching to the choir, here! As a youngster I used to make construction paper bats whose plump little bodies were stuffed with Kleenex. I had so many of them I could’ve made a BAT-mobile (sorry). I’d like to add that, because of the “bats” in films such as MARK OF THE VAMPIRE and SON OF DRACULA, I grew up believing that these gothic mammals flew in a stately “flap-flap” manner, instead of the crazy, irregular way they do in reality. “Igor,” Grampa Munster’s bat, was clearly an elderly Universal holdover. I built my own stately bat for a parody musical based on DRACULA, “Gravediggers of 1922,” and it had a full flashight as its body. Wish I’d kept that…and the only trace of the many Aurora models I once owned is an errant tiny plastic bat or two still hanging around my bookshelves.

Posted By Bob Gutowski : October 12, 2012 1:49 pm

You’re preaching to the choir, here! As a youngster I used to make construction paper bats whose plump little bodies were stuffed with Kleenex. I had so many of them I could’ve made a BAT-mobile (sorry). I’d like to add that, because of the “bats” in films such as MARK OF THE VAMPIRE and SON OF DRACULA, I grew up believing that these gothic mammals flew in a stately “flap-flap” manner, instead of the crazy, irregular way they do in reality. “Igor,” Grampa Munster’s bat, was clearly an elderly Universal holdover. I built my own stately bat for a parody musical based on DRACULA, “Gravediggers of 1922,” and it had a full flashight as its body. Wish I’d kept that…and the only trace of the many Aurora models I once owned is an errant tiny plastic bat or two still hanging around my bookshelves.

Posted By Stephanie : October 12, 2012 4:01 pm

I smiled to see this. Just this week I watched THE VAMPIRE BAT and THE DEVIL BAT for the first time. And, though it is almost embarrassing to admit, for the last week or so that old THE MONSTER SQUAD show has been my bedtime viewing (in the episode last night a “Ronald Ray-gun” was used, with various jokes I doubt they would have used on a kiddie show a few years later when the subject of the pun was president).

I love bats, but the lack of them being the source of the actual threat in THE VAMPIRE BAT actually worked for me. It is almost a spoof of horror films, but the fate of poor Herman reminds you what superstition, fear and mobs can cause.

You are right about bats in modern horror. I was surprised that that I couldn’t think of many notable bats in vampire films of my life time. In the misnamed BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA Drac has an almost blink and you miss it moment as a creature half man and half bat. At least it looked cool. If I include comedy, in LOVE AT FIRST BITE Drac turns into a bat leading to things like the “flying chicken” scene or a bit drunken bat flying(It has been a long time since I’ve seen it, so I might be misremembering a bit).

Maybe bats are just too darn cute for modern horror! Not long ago I took some photos of bats and even my mom admitted they were adorable.

Posted By Stephanie : October 12, 2012 4:01 pm

I smiled to see this. Just this week I watched THE VAMPIRE BAT and THE DEVIL BAT for the first time. And, though it is almost embarrassing to admit, for the last week or so that old THE MONSTER SQUAD show has been my bedtime viewing (in the episode last night a “Ronald Ray-gun” was used, with various jokes I doubt they would have used on a kiddie show a few years later when the subject of the pun was president).

I love bats, but the lack of them being the source of the actual threat in THE VAMPIRE BAT actually worked for me. It is almost a spoof of horror films, but the fate of poor Herman reminds you what superstition, fear and mobs can cause.

You are right about bats in modern horror. I was surprised that that I couldn’t think of many notable bats in vampire films of my life time. In the misnamed BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA Drac has an almost blink and you miss it moment as a creature half man and half bat. At least it looked cool. If I include comedy, in LOVE AT FIRST BITE Drac turns into a bat leading to things like the “flying chicken” scene or a bit drunken bat flying(It has been a long time since I’ve seen it, so I might be misremembering a bit).

Maybe bats are just too darn cute for modern horror! Not long ago I took some photos of bats and even my mom admitted they were adorable.

Posted By Bob Gutowski : October 12, 2012 4:18 pm

This reminds me of our visit a few years ago to Carlsbad Caverns to watch the bats exit the caves for dinner at dusk. The park employee was talking to all of us assembled about various bats before the exodus began, and he got to the vampire bat, and asked how much we knew about the actual critter. “Desmodus rotundus?” I called out. “Now THIS man knows his bats!” he replied. Yeah, I was showing off.

Posted By Bob Gutowski : October 12, 2012 4:18 pm

This reminds me of our visit a few years ago to Carlsbad Caverns to watch the bats exit the caves for dinner at dusk. The park employee was talking to all of us assembled about various bats before the exodus began, and he got to the vampire bat, and asked how much we knew about the actual critter. “Desmodus rotundus?” I called out. “Now THIS man knows his bats!” he replied. Yeah, I was showing off.

Posted By Doug : October 13, 2012 12:53 am

Here we go-years ago a group of us kids were camping near a lake-just after dusk there were bats flying around, getting in the girls hair, causing much screaming (and great fun).
Of course now I realize that they were eating the bugs attracted by the light of our fire, but at the time, we thought we were under attack by we didn’t know what.

Posted By Doug : October 13, 2012 12:53 am

Here we go-years ago a group of us kids were camping near a lake-just after dusk there were bats flying around, getting in the girls hair, causing much screaming (and great fun).
Of course now I realize that they were eating the bugs attracted by the light of our fire, but at the time, we thought we were under attack by we didn’t know what.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : October 13, 2012 1:03 am

Haw haw, you must have been terrified! What fun!

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : October 13, 2012 1:03 am

Haw haw, you must have been terrified! What fun!

Posted By Jenni : October 14, 2012 5:15 pm

About 8 years ago, when the SciFi channel would show MST3000 movies on Sat. mornings, my kids and I watched one about a beautiful couple traveling via auto on their honeymoon when the husband got bit by a bat. The bat’s bite caused him to turn into a bat at night, not a teeny bat, but a human-sized bat-was that film The Bat People you referred to? Jump forward to the last Friday of September, I took my kids on a tour of Onondaga Cave here in MO, at a state park. The tour was well done, the cave was everything one would want in a cave, and there were bats! They were flying around, and got a little too close to the top of my head for comfort, but later we saw the critters in their sleeping areas and they were so tiny! Amazing creatures they certainly are, and I appreciate their mosquito killing powers!

Posted By Jenni : October 14, 2012 5:15 pm

About 8 years ago, when the SciFi channel would show MST3000 movies on Sat. mornings, my kids and I watched one about a beautiful couple traveling via auto on their honeymoon when the husband got bit by a bat. The bat’s bite caused him to turn into a bat at night, not a teeny bat, but a human-sized bat-was that film The Bat People you referred to? Jump forward to the last Friday of September, I took my kids on a tour of Onondaga Cave here in MO, at a state park. The tour was well done, the cave was everything one would want in a cave, and there were bats! They were flying around, and got a little too close to the top of my head for comfort, but later we saw the critters in their sleeping areas and they were so tiny! Amazing creatures they certainly are, and I appreciate their mosquito killing powers!

Posted By Jenni : October 15, 2012 12:57 am

Don’t forget the bat on Gilligan’s Island when in a dream Gilligan’s thinks he is a vampire!

Posted By Jenni : October 15, 2012 12:57 am

Don’t forget the bat on Gilligan’s Island when in a dream Gilligan’s thinks he is a vampire!

Posted By erichkuersten : October 16, 2012 12:45 pm

Hah! Great title! I wrote a post last year called “I Like Big Bugs (and I cannot lie)” focusing mainly on TARANTULA, DEADLY MANTIS, THEM, BEGINNING OF THE… oh why am I telling you? You know how the score, and great minds must think alike.

PS – what in PRC’s name is an ‘alte kaker’?

Posted By erichkuersten : October 16, 2012 12:45 pm

Hah! Great title! I wrote a post last year called “I Like Big Bugs (and I cannot lie)” focusing mainly on TARANTULA, DEADLY MANTIS, THEM, BEGINNING OF THE… oh why am I telling you? You know how the score, and great minds must think alike.

PS – what in PRC’s name is an ‘alte kaker’?

Posted By swac44 : October 17, 2012 10:07 am

I don’t know where to begin with this topic, so many things from my childhood revolve around an early love of bats and resonate with me still today. I still remember my first bat sighting, sleeping under the eaves of a house down the street from ours in Calgary when I was 5 or 6, and as a daily Sesame Street viewer, loved every appearance by Count von Count (and The Amazing Mumford, which I think was the same puppet with bushy eyebrows and a top hat), and I was also a fan of The Munsters and at least the idea of the Universal monsters (wasn’t allowed to watch their movies at that age, but I’ve probably mentioned here before that a friend of mine was, and also had the Aurora model kits). I was also a big Batman fan, thanks to repeats of the Adam West series, and read the comics whenever I could get my hands on them, and loved the character Man-Bat, a scientist who turned himself into a terrifying winged creature, a staple of Batman comics in the ’70s. I always kinda wished they’d use him in a movie, but no dice. He may have turned up in the cartoons though.

I’ve been fascinated by bats ever since, and have had some memorable encounters with them, like a bat cave in Cuba, where dozens of them were whipping through the air around my head. It wasn’t pitch black, but it was fairly dark, but none ever made contact. Every time I’d shine my flashlight up at a niche in the ceiling, it would be filled with 10 or 15 bats all huddled together, who would then burst into the air when the beam hit them. Another time I was in Darwin, in Australia’s northern territory, and a group of giant leathery creatures flew overhead just after dusk, and it took me a while to clue in that they were the aforementioned flying foxes. I like bats, but that seriously freaked me out, until I figured out what they were. Later I saw one up close in a wildlife park in Perth, they’re actually kind of adorable, with creepy blood-red eyes.

Cinematically, I’d be curious to see The Bat Whispers, especially since it was an early experiment in widescreen cinematography, with a version filmed in the 65mm Magnifilm process. The Milestone DVD is long out-of-print, but I keep hoping it shows up on TCM in letterbox format. I’m sure they must have aired it at some point by now.

Posted By swac44 : October 17, 2012 10:07 am

I don’t know where to begin with this topic, so many things from my childhood revolve around an early love of bats and resonate with me still today. I still remember my first bat sighting, sleeping under the eaves of a house down the street from ours in Calgary when I was 5 or 6, and as a daily Sesame Street viewer, loved every appearance by Count von Count (and The Amazing Mumford, which I think was the same puppet with bushy eyebrows and a top hat), and I was also a fan of The Munsters and at least the idea of the Universal monsters (wasn’t allowed to watch their movies at that age, but I’ve probably mentioned here before that a friend of mine was, and also had the Aurora model kits). I was also a big Batman fan, thanks to repeats of the Adam West series, and read the comics whenever I could get my hands on them, and loved the character Man-Bat, a scientist who turned himself into a terrifying winged creature, a staple of Batman comics in the ’70s. I always kinda wished they’d use him in a movie, but no dice. He may have turned up in the cartoons though.

I’ve been fascinated by bats ever since, and have had some memorable encounters with them, like a bat cave in Cuba, where dozens of them were whipping through the air around my head. It wasn’t pitch black, but it was fairly dark, but none ever made contact. Every time I’d shine my flashlight up at a niche in the ceiling, it would be filled with 10 or 15 bats all huddled together, who would then burst into the air when the beam hit them. Another time I was in Darwin, in Australia’s northern territory, and a group of giant leathery creatures flew overhead just after dusk, and it took me a while to clue in that they were the aforementioned flying foxes. I like bats, but that seriously freaked me out, until I figured out what they were. Later I saw one up close in a wildlife park in Perth, they’re actually kind of adorable, with creepy blood-red eyes.

Cinematically, I’d be curious to see The Bat Whispers, especially since it was an early experiment in widescreen cinematography, with a version filmed in the 65mm Magnifilm process. The Milestone DVD is long out-of-print, but I keep hoping it shows up on TCM in letterbox format. I’m sure they must have aired it at some point by now.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : October 17, 2012 2:07 pm

Crikey, swac44, you are well traveled!

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : October 17, 2012 2:07 pm

Crikey, swac44, you are well traveled!

Posted By swac44 : October 18, 2012 9:38 am

Well, when you live in Halifax, you need to get out of town every now and then. (Hey it worked for local natives David Manners and Ruby Keeler.)

Come to think of it (and staying on the Dracula track), has there ever been a Morlocks post about Manners (a.k.a. Rauff de Ryther Duan Acklom, now there’s a vampiric name for you)? He was a fairly major star for a few short years, and got to appear in some rather prestigious films as well as a number of not-so-prestigious titles before vanishing from the screen in 1936. I sometimes refer to him as the Josh Hartnett of the early ’30s (although Manners was a much better actor, of course).

Posted By swac44 : October 18, 2012 9:38 am

Well, when you live in Halifax, you need to get out of town every now and then. (Hey it worked for local natives David Manners and Ruby Keeler.)

Come to think of it (and staying on the Dracula track), has there ever been a Morlocks post about Manners (a.k.a. Rauff de Ryther Duan Acklom, now there’s a vampiric name for you)? He was a fairly major star for a few short years, and got to appear in some rather prestigious films as well as a number of not-so-prestigious titles before vanishing from the screen in 1936. I sometimes refer to him as the Josh Hartnett of the early ’30s (although Manners was a much better actor, of course).

Posted By Juana Maria : October 26, 2012 8:01 pm

Sounds to me that all of you are quite batty about bats! Ha ha ha! 1 2 3..ha ha! Oh! I loved watching the Count on Seasame Street! He was my twin sister’s favorite! She has always had and still has a deep love of bats(she and I both love cats too!) She would make paper bats as a child,later when she could sew,she made a black bat out of cloth and pipe cleaners with beads for eyes. I guess you could say it had beady eyes. Haha! This whole conversation about bats keeps making me laugh. I have seen bats flying in the evening sky where we live. I respect the creatures,I also know there a very few real vampire bats in compared to all the fruit and insect eating bats out there! Also,there are no vampire bats in Romania! They actually live in Latin America. Oh well,my twin sister is devoted to Dracula,always has been. If I had her e-mail address I give it to y’all because this is exactly the sort of thing she is all about! She did a book report in school on bats. How many of you did? Hmm? I’m going to have the Batty Bat song in my head for the rest of the night now. Bye! To close, I just want to say I love when Bela Lagosi says:”Listen to the childen of the night,what beautiful music that make.” Okay,so I guess bats make a screeching sound and a high pitched sonar thing,not music.

Posted By Juana Maria : October 26, 2012 8:01 pm

Sounds to me that all of you are quite batty about bats! Ha ha ha! 1 2 3..ha ha! Oh! I loved watching the Count on Seasame Street! He was my twin sister’s favorite! She has always had and still has a deep love of bats(she and I both love cats too!) She would make paper bats as a child,later when she could sew,she made a black bat out of cloth and pipe cleaners with beads for eyes. I guess you could say it had beady eyes. Haha! This whole conversation about bats keeps making me laugh. I have seen bats flying in the evening sky where we live. I respect the creatures,I also know there a very few real vampire bats in compared to all the fruit and insect eating bats out there! Also,there are no vampire bats in Romania! They actually live in Latin America. Oh well,my twin sister is devoted to Dracula,always has been. If I had her e-mail address I give it to y’all because this is exactly the sort of thing she is all about! She did a book report in school on bats. How many of you did? Hmm? I’m going to have the Batty Bat song in my head for the rest of the night now. Bye! To close, I just want to say I love when Bela Lagosi says:”Listen to the childen of the night,what beautiful music that make.” Okay,so I guess bats make a screeching sound and a high pitched sonar thing,not music.

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