Movies About the Movies

The highly anticipated Hitchcock opens the AFI Film Festival on November 1. Based on the book Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho, the drama interprets the behind-the-scenes production of one of the 20th century’s most influential films. I have not seen a trailer for the film, but based on the publicity stills, the makeup on star Anthony Hopkins results in an uncanny likeness of Hitchcock. Writer-director Sacha Gervasi (Anvil: The Story of Anvil; scriptwriter for The Terminal) lacks a sufficient track record to predict the quality of the drama, but Hopkins is sure to offer an interesting interpretation of the Master of Suspense. In addition to Hitchcock, a film called The Girl, which focuses on the director’s relationship with Tippi Hedren, is in the works. Toby Jones stars as Hitchcock, and Sienna Miller costars as Hedren.

Hitchcock and The Girl belong to that genre generally described as “movies about the movies,” a category irresistible to most film lovers. In doing research for this blog article, I was surprised at the diversity of the films that fall into this genre. There are biopics about beloved actors (Man of a Thousand Faces; The Story of Will Rogers); biopics that examine the adverse effect of Hollywood on the individual, particularly the star system and publicity machine (Frances; Harlow); dark exposes of those industry insiders corrupted by fame and power (Sunset Boulevard; A Star Is Born; The Bad and the Beautiful; Hollywoodland); and comic musings about the nature or history of Hollywood filmmaking (Sherlock, Jr.; Singin’ in the Rain).

ALBERT E. SMITH, J. STUART BLACKTON, & WILLIAM T. ROCK OF VITAGRAPH

This fascination for movies about the movies goes back as far as the film industry itself. In 1908, Vitagraph released what is likely the first film in the genre, Making Motion Pictures: A Day in the Vitagraph Studio. The film follows a production team as it hustles through a day of moviemaking. The team is given a script in the Vitagraph executive offices, then hustled to the studio in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn. Scenes are rehearsed; sets are constructed; the shots are completed. Throughout the film, comic high jinx ensue as the difficulties in production are interpreted as slapstick comedy. At the end, the completed movie, Love Is Better than Riches, is projected.

Four years later, Vitagraph expanded on the genre with A Vitagraph Romance, about the daughter of a prominent senator who defies her family by becoming a movie actress. When the father tracks her down at the studio, he encounters several Vitagraph executives played by themselves, including Albert E. Smith, J. Stuart Blackton, and William T. Rock. The success of A Vitagraph Romance spawned other studios to come up with behind-the-scenes storylines, including Mabel’s Dramatic Career from Keystone. This 1914 comedy starring Mabel Normand may have been the first movie about the movies to be shot in or near Hollywood, though my learned colleague David Kalat likely knows more about this than I do. Recently, I saw the only film starring Charlie Chaplin to be shot in Chicago, His New Job (1915), a charming two-reel short that also belongs to this genre. Released in 1915 by Essanay, the comedy follows Charlie as he reports for work as the prop man at Lodestone Studios (a wink at Keystone, Chaplin’s previous studio) only to end up as the leading man via a series of comic misadventures. (His New Job is available on Youtube.) In all of these films, some part of the filmmaking process and some depiction of studio personnel are part of the storyline, offering a behind-the-scenes glimpse that must have been eye-opening for early movie-goers.

CHAPLIN IN ‘HIS NEW JOB’

As I stumbled across both the famous and the forgotten in this genre, the historian in me detected an evolution of trends and patterns in the movies-about-the-movies genre. While there are notable exceptions in each era, the types of stories in this genre can be charted over the decades. In the 1910s, the films were largely comedies spoofing the process of production and the genre conventions of popular movies like those mentioned above. Other examples from this decade may be obscure, but they sound intriguing: Whiffles Tries Moving Picture Acting (1913), A Film Johnnie (1914), Doc Yak, Motion Picture Artist (1914), and Film’s Favorite Finish (1915). While comedies exploiting behind-the-scenes Hollywood for laughs have never really faded away, other types of stories overshadowed them in subsequent decades. In the 1920s, most movies about the movies were variations on the story of the small town girl who goes to Hollywood to become a star but finds disillusionment and disappointment. If she does become a star, it is not due to talent but to luck or accident. Given the number of young girls who flocked to Hollywood after World War I only to be pushed to the dark fringes of the industry as party girls, the films serve as a kind of warning, even the light-hearted ones. Examples include Hollywood (1923) by James Cruze, Ella Cinders (1926), Broken Hearts of Hollywood (1926), and Merton of the Movies (1924), also directed by Cruze.

‘WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD?’

During the Depression, movies about the movies focused attention on the ruthlessness of the studio system. Universal adapted Once in a Lifetime (1932), the George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart play satirizing the coming of sound, to the screen. What Price Hollywood? (1932), directed by George Cukor, served as a forerunner to the first version of A Star Is Born (1937). Both successfully dramatized the artificial nature of constructing a star image for an actor as well as the pitfalls of stardom itself. Other films included Bombshell (1933), starring Jean Harlow as an actress who supports her free-loading family and employees, Lady Killer with Jimmy Cagney as a gangster turned movie star a la George Raft, and Going Hollywood, a musical with Bing Crosby and Marion Davies.

Movies about the movies faded during the 1940s, except for Preston Sturges’s masterpiece Sullivan’s Travels (1941) and a couple of comedies by Olsen and Johnson, Hellzapoppin (1941) and Crazy House (1943).  The rest of the decade was dominated by a particular type of behind-the-scenes story—the all-star review set in Hollywood. In these films, a thinly drawn plot served as an excuse for guest appearances and performances by the major stars of the period, often to boost morale as part of the war effort.

During the 1950s, the systems and practices that defined the Golden Age began to self-destruct after a series of Supreme Court rulings severely curtailed the studios’ power to control the industry. The results of these rulings included the studios’ release of their iron-fisted control of stars, directors, and others via long-term contracts. Interestingly, a slew of movies that exposed the dark side of the industry in terms of its psychological impact on individuals poured out of Hollywood, including Sunset Boulevard (1951), The Barefoot Contessa (1954), In a Lonely Place (1950), The Goddess (1958), A Star Is Born (1954), and Too Much, Too Soon (1958). There were also several films that revealed dirty studio politics, such as The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) and The Big Knife (1955). Dark, cynical, and bitter, I call these films the “bite the hand that feeds you” genre.

KIM NOVAK IS THE TROUBLED TITLE CHARACTER IN THE BAROQUE ‘LEGEND OF LYLAH CLARE.

Tales of traumatized Hollywood victims and the cynical execs who did them in continued into the 1960s, though their use of color, lurid details, and melodrama represent a change in tone and style. Examples included What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), Inside Daisy Clover (1966), two versions of Harlow (1965), The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968), and The Last Tycoon (1976).

During the 1960s, the Film School Generation, which included film school grads as well as the young directors who had learned their trade on live television, invaded Hollywood with new sensibilities and new aesthetics. Most were knowledgeable if not appreciative of the Golden Age, particularly those contract directors who had slugged it out with the studios for decades. In the 1960s and 1970s, a nostalgia for the old days seeped into movies about the movies without masking the ruthlessness of the business. Howard Zieff’s Hearts of the West (1975), about the mixing of the real and the fake in silent westerns, and Peter Bogdanovich’s Nickelodeon, a love letter to the pioneers of cinema, represent the cream of this crop. Other films that typify this trend are Play It Again, Sam (1972), Gable and Lombard (1975), W.C. Fields and Me (1976), and Won-Ton-Ton, The Dog That Saved Hollywood (1976). A few refrained from nostalgia or romanticism, such as The Day of the Locust (1974) and Inserts (1975), which wallowed in the seamy underbelly of Hollywood. The smartest movie about the movies from this era is Dennis Hopper’s The Last Movie, a self-reflexive cypher of a film that is an unlikely combination of nostalgia and criticism.

PETER BOGDANOVICH PAYS TRIBUTE TO THE PIONEERS OF AMERICAN FILMMAKING IN ‘NICKELODEON.’

Sentimental and nostalgic, Hugo and The Artist seem to have kicked off another round of movies about the movies, which likely influenced the green-lighting of Hitchcock and The Girl. Though each of these films had their champions and detractors, I was just happy they successfully introduced younger generations, who are rarely interested in silent or classic films, to cinema’s illustrious past.

ANDY GRIFFITH AND JEFF BRIDGES IN ‘HEARTS OF THE WEST’

I enjoyed re-visiting some of these titles as I discovered that I have a soft spot for movies about the movies. Of course, I love the classics from this genre—Sunset Boulevard, Sherlock , Jr., Sullivan’s Travels—but my other favorites run toward the quirky, lesser-known films. The references to Hollywood pioneers in Nickelodeon tend to bring out the nerdy film historian in me, while The Last Movie was presented so vividly by one of my film teachers in class that I am a life-long fan of the movie and of Hopper’s. The Legend of Lylah Clare is as over the top as Hollywood itself, and Hearts of the West features Andy Griffith in a role that reminds everyone of what a gifted actor he was.

If Hitchcock is part of a resurgence of movies about the movies, I began thinking about what behind-the-scenes Hollywood tales I would like to see. Though there is a terrific documentary by George Hickenlooper about the production of Apocalypse Now called Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse, I would definitely watch a dramatic interpretation about the troubled shoot of this iconic film.  The search for an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara is a Hollywood story of mythic proportions—and one that was chronicled in a long-ago made-for-TV film called The Scarlett O’Hara War. However, the actresses who vied for the coveted role of Scarlett were all portrayed by unknowns in that 1980 film. A remake featuring today’s female stars as yesterday’s screen legends might be fun, though the experience would likely reveal how very few of today’s too-thin, too-dim actresses measure up.

What Hollywood story do you think is ripe for a movie about the movies? Who knows, maybe someone in the film industry is listening.

0 Response Movies About the Movies
Posted By FONZIE : October 1, 2012 12:45 pm

Kim Novak is my other fave actress after Natalie Wood of course:):)!!

Posted By FONZIE : October 1, 2012 12:45 pm

Kim Novak is my other fave actress after Natalie Wood of course:):)!!

Posted By Ghijath Naddaf : October 1, 2012 1:00 pm

I used to like “The Stuntman” a lot.But i think that it has not
aged to well.
About the Ideas for Movies.Jim Thompson´s fighting the Demons
of Alcohol,while try to survive as a Screenwriter in Hollywood
could be a good Story.
But maybe just for me,as a diehard Thompson Fan.

Posted By Ghijath Naddaf : October 1, 2012 1:00 pm

I used to like “The Stuntman” a lot.But i think that it has not
aged to well.
About the Ideas for Movies.Jim Thompson´s fighting the Demons
of Alcohol,while try to survive as a Screenwriter in Hollywood
could be a good Story.
But maybe just for me,as a diehard Thompson Fan.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 1, 2012 1:50 pm

Ghijath Naddaf: I saw THE STUNT MAN again recently after having not seen it since it came out. I agree. It has not aged well. And, an adaptation of any Jim Thompson story would be good.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 1, 2012 1:50 pm

Ghijath Naddaf: I saw THE STUNT MAN again recently after having not seen it since it came out. I agree. It has not aged well. And, an adaptation of any Jim Thompson story would be good.

Posted By Walter L : October 1, 2012 1:57 pm

I believe you mean “Crazy House” not “Crazy Horse” for the Olsen and Johnson film from 1943.

Posted By Walter L : October 1, 2012 1:57 pm

I believe you mean “Crazy House” not “Crazy Horse” for the Olsen and Johnson film from 1943.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 1, 2012 2:02 pm

Walter L: Thank you for catching the typo, though Olsen and Johnson in “Crazy Horse” might be even funnier!

Posted By Susan Doll : October 1, 2012 2:02 pm

Walter L: Thank you for catching the typo, though Olsen and Johnson in “Crazy Horse” might be even funnier!

Posted By Margaret Perry Movies : October 1, 2012 2:59 pm

I liked the scenes in THE AVIATOR that were about making movies, especially about HELL’S ANGELS and Katharine Hepburn
http://thegreatkh.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/cate-blanchett-as-kate-hepburn-in.html

Posted By Margaret Perry Movies : October 1, 2012 2:59 pm

I liked the scenes in THE AVIATOR that were about making movies, especially about HELL’S ANGELS and Katharine Hepburn
http://thegreatkh.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/cate-blanchett-as-kate-hepburn-in.html

Posted By Martha C. : October 1, 2012 2:59 pm

I absolutely LOVE “What Price Hollywood”…whenever it’s on TCM I record and watch it over and over…

When I think about “movies about movies” though, the first movie that comes to mind is “Barton Fink”…not sure why, it’s so much more than that!

I’d like to see a biopic on Robert Taylor…interesting life, IMO. :)

Martha

Posted By Martha C. : October 1, 2012 2:59 pm

I absolutely LOVE “What Price Hollywood”…whenever it’s on TCM I record and watch it over and over…

When I think about “movies about movies” though, the first movie that comes to mind is “Barton Fink”…not sure why, it’s so much more than that!

I’d like to see a biopic on Robert Taylor…interesting life, IMO. :)

Martha

Posted By chris : October 1, 2012 3:43 pm

There’s also Blake Edwards’ “S.O.B” as well.

Posted By chris : October 1, 2012 3:43 pm

There’s also Blake Edwards’ “S.O.B” as well.

Posted By Anonymous : October 1, 2012 3:49 pm

How about Robert Altman’s “The Player”?

Posted By Anonymous : October 1, 2012 3:49 pm

How about Robert Altman’s “The Player”?

Posted By Gene : October 1, 2012 3:50 pm

Great article. The love of movies and Hollywood, in particular, seems to be an never ending story. I may be wrong here but I can not think of too much fiction that celebrates the writing of fiction or fine art that celebrates the world of fine art as there is cinema that turns the lens upon itself. As seedy as it can get at times in exposes such as Sunset Blvd. I still love the movies.

Posted By Gene : October 1, 2012 3:50 pm

Great article. The love of movies and Hollywood, in particular, seems to be an never ending story. I may be wrong here but I can not think of too much fiction that celebrates the writing of fiction or fine art that celebrates the world of fine art as there is cinema that turns the lens upon itself. As seedy as it can get at times in exposes such as Sunset Blvd. I still love the movies.

Posted By Anthony : October 1, 2012 3:51 pm

How about Robert Altman’s “The Player”?

Posted By Anthony : October 1, 2012 3:51 pm

How about Robert Altman’s “The Player”?

Posted By Kingrat : October 1, 2012 5:19 pm

Another great example of an early comic film about Hollywood is SHOW PEOPLE (1928), which also includes cameo appearances by some of the stars on the lot.

Posted By Kingrat : October 1, 2012 5:19 pm

Another great example of an early comic film about Hollywood is SHOW PEOPLE (1928), which also includes cameo appearances by some of the stars on the lot.

Posted By Brett Piper : October 1, 2012 8:33 pm

Mario Van Peebles BAADASSSSSS! is one of the greatest movies about making a movie ever made, especially to those of us who’ve toiled in the basement of the industry.

Posted By Brett Piper : October 1, 2012 8:33 pm

Mario Van Peebles BAADASSSSSS! is one of the greatest movies about making a movie ever made, especially to those of us who’ve toiled in the basement of the industry.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 1, 2012 10:20 pm

Good additions to my list — it was hard to think of them all myself. Do love The Player, though. I can’t believe I left that one out.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 1, 2012 10:20 pm

Good additions to my list — it was hard to think of them all myself. Do love The Player, though. I can’t believe I left that one out.

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : October 2, 2012 12:16 am

There’s also Joe Dante and Allan Arkush’s Hollywood Boulevard, where the Corman kids parody the filmmaking process at Corman’s New World Pictures.

Also, Noel Black, the director of Pretty Poison made a film few people have seen, about a student filmmaker, Cover Me, Babe.

A few other titles, Christopher Guest’s The Big Picture and also For Your Consideration, and William Asher’s Movers & Shakers.

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : October 2, 2012 12:16 am

There’s also Joe Dante and Allan Arkush’s Hollywood Boulevard, where the Corman kids parody the filmmaking process at Corman’s New World Pictures.

Also, Noel Black, the director of Pretty Poison made a film few people have seen, about a student filmmaker, Cover Me, Babe.

A few other titles, Christopher Guest’s The Big Picture and also For Your Consideration, and William Asher’s Movers & Shakers.

Posted By Suzanne Scherrer : October 2, 2012 2:26 am

It’s nice to see some love for “Nickelodeon.” It has always been one of my favorites.

Posted By Suzanne Scherrer : October 2, 2012 2:26 am

It’s nice to see some love for “Nickelodeon.” It has always been one of my favorites.

Posted By stendhaler : October 2, 2012 5:52 am

You should check out some films from Iran. For some reason, Iranian directors love making films about filmmaking.

Posted By stendhaler : October 2, 2012 5:52 am

You should check out some films from Iran. For some reason, Iranian directors love making films about filmmaking.

Posted By Doug : October 2, 2012 10:33 am

Shocked that these haven’t yet been mentioned:
“Stand In” from 1937 which I discovered when TCM featured Joan Blondell a few months ago-Leslie Howard and Bogart, too!

“Sunset” 1988- starring Bruce Willis and James Garner.

Posted By Doug : October 2, 2012 10:33 am

Shocked that these haven’t yet been mentioned:
“Stand In” from 1937 which I discovered when TCM featured Joan Blondell a few months ago-Leslie Howard and Bogart, too!

“Sunset” 1988- starring Bruce Willis and James Garner.

Posted By swac44 : October 2, 2012 12:15 pm

Darn, I was in Flatbush last weekend, en route to Coney Island, and I forgot to go looking for the old Vitagraph smokestack, which I’d heard was still standing in the area. Maybe next time…

Posted By swac44 : October 2, 2012 12:15 pm

Darn, I was in Flatbush last weekend, en route to Coney Island, and I forgot to go looking for the old Vitagraph smokestack, which I’d heard was still standing in the area. Maybe next time…

Posted By johnnystal : October 2, 2012 12:51 pm

Reblogged this on Dachau Cabana and commented:
Can’t wait for this!!

Posted By johnnystal : October 2, 2012 12:51 pm

Reblogged this on Dachau Cabana and commented:
Can’t wait for this!!

Posted By swac44 : October 2, 2012 2:43 pm

Now that I’ve given the piece a good going-over, I was pleased to see a mention of Once in a Lifetime which covers a lot of the ground that Singin’ in the Rain does, but with even more of a satirical edge, plus it’s always a treat to see Jack Oakie, and an actress I’ve only recently discovered, Aline MacMahon. The film was shown in 35mm at Cinefest in Syracuse this past March, and it was fun to watch it with an audience of film buffs. I think I’ve mentioned this title on Morlocks before, especially the fact that it comes with a written prologue by Carl Laemmle where he crows about Universal being the only studio with the guts to tell the truth about Hollywood!

Speaking of Hollywood, James Cruze’s Hollywood is a lost film it seems, but its striking poster depicting a huge laughing face swallowing naive newcomers has become quite well-known.
http://www.fotos.org/galeria/data/576/1923-Hollywood-o-la-Meca-de-la-Cinematografia-James-Cruze-USA.jpg

Posted By swac44 : October 2, 2012 2:43 pm

Now that I’ve given the piece a good going-over, I was pleased to see a mention of Once in a Lifetime which covers a lot of the ground that Singin’ in the Rain does, but with even more of a satirical edge, plus it’s always a treat to see Jack Oakie, and an actress I’ve only recently discovered, Aline MacMahon. The film was shown in 35mm at Cinefest in Syracuse this past March, and it was fun to watch it with an audience of film buffs. I think I’ve mentioned this title on Morlocks before, especially the fact that it comes with a written prologue by Carl Laemmle where he crows about Universal being the only studio with the guts to tell the truth about Hollywood!

Speaking of Hollywood, James Cruze’s Hollywood is a lost film it seems, but its striking poster depicting a huge laughing face swallowing naive newcomers has become quite well-known.
http://www.fotos.org/galeria/data/576/1923-Hollywood-o-la-Meca-de-la-Cinematografia-James-Cruze-USA.jpg

Posted By Julie : October 2, 2012 3:37 pm

One of the most romantic tributes to moviemaking that I can think of, actually, is a biopic on the unlikeliest of subjects – “Ed Wood.” If we’re including foreign films here, it begins and ends with 8 1/2. And while I don’t know how accurate the aforementioned “Barton Fink” is, hearing Tony Shalhoub say “Wallace Beery wrestling picture!” never ceases to crack me up.

Posted By Julie : October 2, 2012 3:37 pm

One of the most romantic tributes to moviemaking that I can think of, actually, is a biopic on the unlikeliest of subjects – “Ed Wood.” If we’re including foreign films here, it begins and ends with 8 1/2. And while I don’t know how accurate the aforementioned “Barton Fink” is, hearing Tony Shalhoub say “Wallace Beery wrestling picture!” never ceases to crack me up.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 2, 2012 5:33 pm

Doug and Julie: Sunset and Ed Wood are two of my favorite movies about movies from a more contemporary era.

Swac44: Would love to see Once in a Lifetime.

Posted By Susan Doll : October 2, 2012 5:33 pm

Doug and Julie: Sunset and Ed Wood are two of my favorite movies about movies from a more contemporary era.

Swac44: Would love to see Once in a Lifetime.

Posted By DBenson : October 2, 2012 7:19 pm

Find myself thinking about Warner cartoons — not just the celebrity caricatures, but the ones that played off moviemaking.

An early one had Porky Pig trying to make it in real movies (with live action footage); later we saw Elmer Fudd tearing up his contract and walking out of a Bugs Bunny cartoon; Bugs attending the Academy Awards; Pepe LePew touring a French silent studio; Daffy Duck employed as Bugs’s stunt double; Yosemite Sam groveling before a Nero-like director on an ancient Roman epic; and of course Daffy pitching a swashbuckler script.

Posted By DBenson : October 2, 2012 7:19 pm

Find myself thinking about Warner cartoons — not just the celebrity caricatures, but the ones that played off moviemaking.

An early one had Porky Pig trying to make it in real movies (with live action footage); later we saw Elmer Fudd tearing up his contract and walking out of a Bugs Bunny cartoon; Bugs attending the Academy Awards; Pepe LePew touring a French silent studio; Daffy Duck employed as Bugs’s stunt double; Yosemite Sam groveling before a Nero-like director on an ancient Roman epic; and of course Daffy pitching a swashbuckler script.

Posted By Dave M. : October 2, 2012 7:22 pm

Big fan of Truffaut’s Day For Night.

I also like De Palma’s Blow Out and Body Double for its glimpses into the making of low budget horror.

Posted By Dave M. : October 2, 2012 7:22 pm

Big fan of Truffaut’s Day For Night.

I also like De Palma’s Blow Out and Body Double for its glimpses into the making of low budget horror.

Posted By Jane H : October 2, 2012 10:15 pm

What Hollywood story am I waiting for? The Roscoe Arbuckle trials, with Buster Keaton supporting role. Such a multilayered tragedy. Plus there are present day cultural parallels.

Posted By Jane H : October 2, 2012 10:15 pm

What Hollywood story am I waiting for? The Roscoe Arbuckle trials, with Buster Keaton supporting role. Such a multilayered tragedy. Plus there are present day cultural parallels.

Posted By vp19 : October 3, 2012 1:47 am

Add a “what might have been” to films about Hollywood: In late 1963 and early ’64, reports circulated in trade magazines that a Carole Lombard biopic was in the works, starring Constance Towers, fresh off two fine performances for Samuel Fuller, “Shock Corridor” and “The Naked Kiss.” It never came about, and when I contacted Constance a few years ago, her rep said she recalled nothing of the project. Learn more about this at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/194107.html.

Another rumored Lombard was the luminous Michelle Pfeiffer, though this would have focused on her brief relationship with Russ Columbo (who would have been portrayed by…Tom Cruise!). This was to have happened around 1992, and it never reached fruition. More info on this is at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/48480.html.

Posted By vp19 : October 3, 2012 1:47 am

Add a “what might have been” to films about Hollywood: In late 1963 and early ’64, reports circulated in trade magazines that a Carole Lombard biopic was in the works, starring Constance Towers, fresh off two fine performances for Samuel Fuller, “Shock Corridor” and “The Naked Kiss.” It never came about, and when I contacted Constance a few years ago, her rep said she recalled nothing of the project. Learn more about this at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/194107.html.

Another rumored Lombard was the luminous Michelle Pfeiffer, though this would have focused on her brief relationship with Russ Columbo (who would have been portrayed by…Tom Cruise!). This was to have happened around 1992, and it never reached fruition. More info on this is at http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/48480.html.

Posted By Stacia : October 3, 2012 7:17 am

I like the idea of a film about Jim Thompson, and would also like to see one on Herschell Gordon Lewis.

I really think the William Desmond Taylor case could make a terrific movie. As much as I love Bogdanovich, The Cat’s Meow was just a trifle, nothing more than a way to show off a stellar (but mostly wasted) cast.

Posted By Stacia : October 3, 2012 7:17 am

I like the idea of a film about Jim Thompson, and would also like to see one on Herschell Gordon Lewis.

I really think the William Desmond Taylor case could make a terrific movie. As much as I love Bogdanovich, The Cat’s Meow was just a trifle, nothing more than a way to show off a stellar (but mostly wasted) cast.

Posted By Mariah : October 20, 2012 12:21 pm

The Arbuckle trials are about to made into a movie airing on HBO. “Cam” from Modern Family was chosen to play Arbuckle.

Posted By Mariah : October 20, 2012 12:21 pm

The Arbuckle trials are about to made into a movie airing on HBO. “Cam” from Modern Family was chosen to play Arbuckle.

Posted By swac44 : October 20, 2012 12:33 pm

I’m not familiar with the work of that actor, Eric Stonestreet, but I can see how he’d at least look the part without much effort.

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3087837440/nm0832314

I always thought there was a bit of a resemblance between Arbuckle and a younger Charles Durning, although I don’t know that Durning ever had the same sort of heft.

Posted By swac44 : October 20, 2012 12:33 pm

I’m not familiar with the work of that actor, Eric Stonestreet, but I can see how he’d at least look the part without much effort.

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3087837440/nm0832314

I always thought there was a bit of a resemblance between Arbuckle and a younger Charles Durning, although I don’t know that Durning ever had the same sort of heft.

Posted By robbushblog : November 14, 2012 2:43 pm

I love Get Shorty and the idea that making movies and being an enforcer for the mob are practically the same thing.

Shadow of the Vampire is another that I have seen several times.

I remember seeing The Scarlett O’Hara War, My Wicked, Wicked Ways and Gable and Lombard all around the same time in the early 80′s. They helped to build my love for old movies.

Posted By robbushblog : November 14, 2012 2:43 pm

I love Get Shorty and the idea that making movies and being an enforcer for the mob are practically the same thing.

Shadow of the Vampire is another that I have seen several times.

I remember seeing The Scarlett O’Hara War, My Wicked, Wicked Ways and Gable and Lombard all around the same time in the early 80′s. They helped to build my love for old movies.

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