Stuff I love

I feel as though I’ve been complaining a lot lately. Pointing the finger. Assigning blame. And so, with my birthday looming, I’m going to take a break from all that and throw some love at you. Case in point… THE BLOB (1958). I love everything about THE BLOB — those brilliant primary colors, the depiction of small town American life, the whole sequence set in the spookshow, Olin Howlin in his final film role, the theme song — but specifically I love the Blob. Look at it! It’s gorgeous! So red, like somebody melted a bunch of Swedish Fish and rolled it into a ball. Who in their right mind wouldn’t want to be consumed by that?

I love Eve Arden! Oh, don’t get me wrong — I love Vincent Price, too. He’s great, as we all know, but I really love Eve Arden. Had I been born at the right time and in the right place, I could have loved her, too, if you get my meaning. She was never considered beautiful by Hollywood standards, and so she was always stuck playing the heroine’s best friend or charged with the task of trucking in the comic relief, as all big, horsey women are, but I think she’s absolutely gorgeous. She’s got the perfect touch of masculinity that I think is essential to true beauty. I guess I should admit that I never went for girly girls. Oh, I can agree with you that Ava Gardner, Marilyn Monroe, and Grace Kelly are pretty girls, cover girl material, and I’m not lying… but they don’t touch me. Eve Arden, on the other hand, makes me weak in the knees. If she had been a film noir heroine and I her fall guy, I would have been putty in her hands. I don’t know if it’s the long nose or the brick-like forehead or those intoxicatingly full lips, or that she was quick with a wisecrack and an arched eyebrow… or a combination of all of the above… but Eve Arden just does it for me. She was great in everything but if I had to pin her down to one essential role it just might be as Sgt. Natalia Moskaroff in THE DOUGHGIRLS (1944). Eve Arden in a Soviet military uniform? Da!

I love THE OMEGA MAN (1979), unapologetically. Sure, I’ve read Richard Matheson’s source novel, I Am Legend and yes it’s great and no I’m not saying THE OMEGA MAN is a faithful adaptation or better than the book… but I don’t care! I first saw this movie as an 11 or 12 year old and something about it just clicked with me. Chief among its many strengths are taut direction by the reliable Boris Sagal, a wonderful score by Ron Granier, Anthony Zerbe as the leader of the mutant pack, and Chuck Heston rocking his bachelor lifestyle armed with a Browning automatic rifle (pictured, with infrared scope) and a sweet Smith & Wesson 9mm submachine gun. Maybe the movie only really works on the level of kids’ fantasy but the important thing is that it works for me. I love “the Family,” those robed albino fundamentalist creeps who attack Heston by night and whom he hunts down by day, and that sense one gets of the last man on earth kicking around in the bones of a denuded Los Angeles. Now that I live here I watch the movie with a different eye, trying to chart his exact whereabouts at any given time. It’s how I make my fun.

I love old dark house movies. Not just THE OLD DARK HOUSE (1932) — which I do love — but any old creepshow set in some crumbling mansion. Whether the movie itself is immortal, I don’t care. Good or bad, you can’t go wrong with an old dark house movie… be it THE CAT AND THE CANARY (1927, 1939, 1978) or THE CAT CREEPS (1930, 1946) or THE GORILLA (1927, 1930, 1939), or THE PHANTOM OF CRESTWOOD (1932), or THE GHOST BREAKERS (1940) or ONE FRIGHTENED NIGHT (1935) or HORROR ISLAND (1941) or THE BLACK CAT (1941) or AND THEN THERE WERE NONE/TEN LITTLE INDIANS (1945, 1965, 1974, etc.). Any movie where a bunch of people show up at some foreboding abode and have to spend the night, some of it spent creeping around with flashlights and/or candles, and finding sliding panels and trap doors, where schemers and killers clutch and strangle. It doesn’t even have to be a house, per se – could be an inn, as in THE ROGUE’S TAVERN (1936), or even a lighthouse, as in SHH! THE OCTOPUS! (1937) and TOWER OF EVIL (aka HORROR OF SNAPE ISLAND, 1971). Even though these movies revolve around murder, I find them so comforting and genteel. People are always meeting in the dining room and having dinner or hang in the study and drink port or scotch from classy glasses while a fire burns in the hearth and rain lashes at the window. Even as a little kid, I loved this scenario. I felt at home and safe, even as the bodies began piling up.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHvs6_-MxX4]

I love this theme song. Actually, I love THE LOST CONTINENT (1968) through and through. It’s got everything: lost ships, strange worlds, strangling seaweed, typhoons, mutiny, Spanish Inquisitors, killer crustaceans, girls with giant racks, gunplay, sharks, booze… and to think I first saw this at a kiddie matinee. Thank you, Hammer! Thank you for BRIDES OF DRACULA (1961) and QUATERMASS AND THE PIT (1968) and DRACULA A.D. 1972 (1972) and just everything. I really could not imagine my life without you.

I get a little crazy thinking about Gale Sondergaard. Yeah, I know what I said about Eve Arden above and it’s true but Gale Sondergaard… she’s just so bad! Man, there was just something so delightful witchy about that woman (no surprise she was short-listed to play the Wicked Witch of the West in THE WIZARD OF OZ). She’s full of secrets! She played a variety of roles during her long career, of course (THE LIFE OF EMIL ZOLA, THE LETTER, THE MARK OF ZORRO), but I like her best as a calculating servant, one usually in touch with the spirits, as in THE CAT AND THE CANARY (1939) or THE BLACK CAT (1941). Really, I love in anything where she’s constantly peeking around curtains and listening in on other people’s conversations and plotting, plotting, plotting! She was a great Sherlock Holmes villain, too, so much so that Universal spun her off into a follow-up film in which she played a different spider woman than the one who had locked antlers with Basil Rathbone two years earlier. Zenobia Dollard! What a great name for a spider woman. I’d like to imagine knowing her back in the Forties but we never could have had a life together, being that she was a Red. I mean, to each his own, but I would have gotten annoyed at all the party meetings held in our house and it would have led to tension and I love Gale Sondergaard too much to fight about politics. I got to see her perform live once, when she was very old. All I really remember about her is the white hair and those teeth. She had a great smile.

I love WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE (1951). Is is the best science fiction film of the 1950s? No, not by a long shot. I’d rate THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL (1950), THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD (1951) and INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956) higher, in terms of innovation, execution, and message, but I have a strange love of WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE that eclipses all other considerations. I had a Super 8 cutdown of the film when I was a kid, mostly consisting of the disaster scenes, and I fell in love with that intricate miniature work. It still thrills me, even now. You can keep your fancy CGI. Give me mattes and minis any day… and especially on my birthday!

Speaking of the end of the world, I love BENEATH THE PLANET OF THE APES (1970). Inferior sequel? Sure. Cheaply made? I guess? A whole lot of apocalyptic fun? Undoubtedly! I saw this as an 8 year old and it seriously bent my psyche. Between this and THE OMEGA MAN, it’s a wonder I even stuck around to see the future, let alone live in it. This movie is brutal! Major Hollywood stars murdered in front of your eyes! Crucified apes! Radiation scarred mutants(pictured)! And PUH-POW, it all blows up in the final frames. Crippling! Scarring! Rated G! And yet here I am, at age 51 (almost) and BENEATH THE PLANET OF THE APES is close to my heart, like the girl in elementary school with the really high forehead who gave me my first kiss.

And to deflect accusations that I’m just totally Psychotronic 24-7, I also love John Ford’s 3 GODFATHERS (1948). I’m a big John Wayne fan, always have been, always will be. I don’t know if it can be scientifically determined but I’m willing to wager my standing in the scientific community against my belief that Wayne was never better than he was here. He has all the bluster and machismo of his better-known film roles but there’s a disarming vulnerability, that gives his performance great nuance. The horror in his voice during his Terrapin Tanks speech is one of John Wayne’s greatest moments in film but I don’t want to underestimate the contributions of costars Harry Carey, Jr., and Pedro Armandariz, Sr. Also, Ward Bond. I love Ward Bond. In a manly, four-square sort of way of which Ward Bond would approve.

Oh, I could go on and on. I love too many things! I love James Wong Howe and George Robinson and Karl Freund and Dick Bush and John Cocquillon and Owen Roisman! I love Dimitri Tiomkin and Hans Salter and Frank Skinner and Ennio Morricone and Piero Piccione and Luis Bacalov! I love King Donovan and KING KONG (1933) and Mary Treen and MARY MARY BLOODY MARY (1975) and John P. Fulton and Jack P. Pierce and Edward D. Wood – yeah, I love Ed Wood! And not ironically either. ! I love Willis O’Brien and Ray Harryhausen and Jim Danforth! I love Mario Bava and Sergio Leone and Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Georges Franju and Roger Corman and John Gilling and Terence Fisher and James Whale! I love THE FALL OF THE OUSE OF USHER (1960) and MR. BLANDINGS BUILDS HIS DREAM HOUSE (1946) and HOUSE OF DRACULA (1945) and THE HOUSE ON 92ND STREET (1945). I love BABETTE’S FEAST (1987) and BLOOD FEAST (1963). I love CARNIVAL OF SOULS (1962) and SKYSCRAPER SOULS (1932) and ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)! I love VAMPYR (1932) and BULLIT (1968) and ERASERHEAD (1977). I love Lee Meriwether! Not just in BATMAN (1966), where she is The Best Catwoman Ever, but in 4D MAN (1959), where she is just total sex. Total sex! In a totally straight role, too, in a lab coat and everything — total sex! Watch 4D MAN and see that I’m right! What else? I love the soundtrack to BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW (1971) and the opening titles to THE WRECK OF THE MARY DEARE (1959) and the end of THE LIST OF ADRIAN MESSINGER (1963).

I love Mort Mills and Hayley Mills and John Larch and John Anderson and John Randolph and John Payne and many other movie Johns — ooh, John McGiver! And Woodrow Parfrey and Woodrow Chambliss and Morgan Woodward. And the scene where they take the car apart in THE FRENCH CONNECTION (1971) and any moment in a movie where an actor accidentally swallows a fly, and that part in THE DIRTY DOZEN (1968) where John Cassavetes says “You slobs! You slobs!” and that part in FURY OF THE WOLFMAN (1972) where the girl says “That isn’t scientific! That isn’t scientific!” and the end of BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI (1957) where James Donald says “Madness… madness… madness!” Actually, I love James Donald in just about anything. I love Italian psychothrillers and Spanish horror movies and Philippine jungle prison movies and German crime thrillers based on the mystery novels of Edgar Wallace! I love Karloff! Lugosi! Carradine! Chaney pere! Chaney fils! Atwill! Zucco! Dwight Frye! Evelyn Ankers! Ernest Thesiger! Una O’Connor! I love O.P. Heggie — do you even know who O.P. Heggie is? Oh, love! I love too many things! There’s so much to love in the movies! Oh frabjous day! Oh frabjous birthday to me!

0 Response Stuff I love
Posted By Drue King : August 31, 2012 5:09 am

I just re-watched 4D man and you are dead on. The only thing that is a worse distraction is that trumpet. My movie thing is usually a plot that is so unusual, that it’s never used again. “”Killdozer” is about a what?”, “Andy Griffith wants to go to the moon you say?”, “People go bald and psychotic and it stars Don from Lost in Space?”, “Charles Bronson is a melon farmer?”, “It has the word vampire in the film but there are no vampires?”, wait, that last one was used again.

Posted By Drue King : August 31, 2012 5:09 am

I just re-watched 4D man and you are dead on. The only thing that is a worse distraction is that trumpet. My movie thing is usually a plot that is so unusual, that it’s never used again. “”Killdozer” is about a what?”, “Andy Griffith wants to go to the moon you say?”, “People go bald and psychotic and it stars Don from Lost in Space?”, “Charles Bronson is a melon farmer?”, “It has the word vampire in the film but there are no vampires?”, wait, that last one was used again.

Posted By NCEddie : August 31, 2012 6:13 am

Oh, I love Mary Treen, I just added her to a list of best character actresses today.

Posted By NCEddie : August 31, 2012 6:13 am

Oh, I love Mary Treen, I just added her to a list of best character actresses today.

Posted By James : August 31, 2012 10:32 am

I love old dark house movies as well, even if the premise is contrived (but isn’t that part of the appeal)? If you keep an open mind as to what films qualify as a member in good standing of the genre, you can even include The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Clue (1985) and even Alien (1979).

That last one even has a sturdier premise – unlike a house, you really can’t leave a spaceship easily if something evil is lurking inside.

Posted By James : August 31, 2012 10:32 am

I love old dark house movies as well, even if the premise is contrived (but isn’t that part of the appeal)? If you keep an open mind as to what films qualify as a member in good standing of the genre, you can even include The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Clue (1985) and even Alien (1979).

That last one even has a sturdier premise – unlike a house, you really can’t leave a spaceship easily if something evil is lurking inside.

Posted By changeling : August 31, 2012 10:54 am

Nothing beats the original Blob starring Steve McQueen:):)!!

Posted By changeling : August 31, 2012 10:54 am

Nothing beats the original Blob starring Steve McQueen:):)!!

Posted By Marty McKee : August 31, 2012 12:31 pm

Dort Clark! And Fred Clark, for that matter. Definitely Candy Clark.

Posted By Marty McKee : August 31, 2012 12:31 pm

Dort Clark! And Fred Clark, for that matter. Definitely Candy Clark.

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[...] tcm Movie Morlocks – stuff I love (one thing I love is this idea, and will be shamelessly borrowing it) [...]

Posted By swac44 : August 31, 2012 1:13 pm

I think RHS and I might have been separated at birth (six years apart). Omega Man and Beneath the Planet of the Apes both gave me nightmares as a kid (as did Soylent Green, I had dreams where I was getting swept up in those garbage trucks). Also love old dark house movies, I got that six-movie set from Warner Home Archives recently, and had to watch Sh! The Octopus twice in a row, just to make sure that I’d actually just seen what I thought I’d seen.

I’m slightly ashamed to say I had to go to IMDb for O.P. Heggie, especially after his credits came up (although I was most surprised by the fact he was Matthew Cuthbert in the 1934 Anne of Green Gables, seeing as I live right next door to Anneland (a.k.a. Prince Edward Island).

Posted By swac44 : August 31, 2012 1:13 pm

I think RHS and I might have been separated at birth (six years apart). Omega Man and Beneath the Planet of the Apes both gave me nightmares as a kid (as did Soylent Green, I had dreams where I was getting swept up in those garbage trucks). Also love old dark house movies, I got that six-movie set from Warner Home Archives recently, and had to watch Sh! The Octopus twice in a row, just to make sure that I’d actually just seen what I thought I’d seen.

I’m slightly ashamed to say I had to go to IMDb for O.P. Heggie, especially after his credits came up (although I was most surprised by the fact he was Matthew Cuthbert in the 1934 Anne of Green Gables, seeing as I live right next door to Anneland (a.k.a. Prince Edward Island).

Posted By swac44 : August 31, 2012 1:15 pm

Also, Drue made the second Killdozer reference I’ve come across today. When the heck is that going to become available? That’s another childhood nightmare I need to revisit.

Posted By swac44 : August 31, 2012 1:15 pm

Also, Drue made the second Killdozer reference I’ve come across today. When the heck is that going to become available? That’s another childhood nightmare I need to revisit.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : August 31, 2012 1:34 pm

Ack, Fred Clark! He should’ve been in there! Well, I left out a lot of things. A lot. What can I say? I have a lot of love to give.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : August 31, 2012 1:34 pm

Ack, Fred Clark! He should’ve been in there! Well, I left out a lot of things. A lot. What can I say? I have a lot of love to give.

Posted By changeling : August 31, 2012 1:39 pm

To swao 41: Yeah right….:)

Posted By changeling : August 31, 2012 1:39 pm

To swao 41: Yeah right….:)

Posted By Juana Maria : August 31, 2012 4:45 pm

RHS:I read your article and I agree! There are so many actors in your list I have felt are my favorites too! Morgan Woodward is one that just doesn’t get the attention he deserves! He went to college with Fess Parker and L. Q.Jones and they’re all Texans! How amazing is that?! Anyway I first saw Woodward on “Star Trek” and his face stuck in my mind..later to notice him again in “Cool Hand Luke”. I don’t know if creep old houses or lighthouses or some of the locales you mentioned make me want ot hang around for long! Nah! I’d rather in be in a Western! Sure,there are so many great character actors in Westerns. I too love the 1948 version of “3 Godfathers”,though I have watched some of the other versions. John Wayne is really good in the movie,so is everyone else. I love Ward Bond too,since I am a woman I’m not going to explain it’s in some “4 square sorta way”.I really think Ward Bond is quite handsome and noticable on film. Especially in Ford pictures,I like when he is “the Gringo” in “The Fugitive”. It is confusing when there are films with the same title but different story lines. Hmm,oh well!Just one more thing! I too love “The Blob” with Steve McQueen! I remember seeing that movie in black in white,not color,probably because I watched it on a black and white TV! Remember those?

Posted By Juana Maria : August 31, 2012 4:45 pm

RHS:I read your article and I agree! There are so many actors in your list I have felt are my favorites too! Morgan Woodward is one that just doesn’t get the attention he deserves! He went to college with Fess Parker and L. Q.Jones and they’re all Texans! How amazing is that?! Anyway I first saw Woodward on “Star Trek” and his face stuck in my mind..later to notice him again in “Cool Hand Luke”. I don’t know if creep old houses or lighthouses or some of the locales you mentioned make me want ot hang around for long! Nah! I’d rather in be in a Western! Sure,there are so many great character actors in Westerns. I too love the 1948 version of “3 Godfathers”,though I have watched some of the other versions. John Wayne is really good in the movie,so is everyone else. I love Ward Bond too,since I am a woman I’m not going to explain it’s in some “4 square sorta way”.I really think Ward Bond is quite handsome and noticable on film. Especially in Ford pictures,I like when he is “the Gringo” in “The Fugitive”. It is confusing when there are films with the same title but different story lines. Hmm,oh well!Just one more thing! I too love “The Blob” with Steve McQueen! I remember seeing that movie in black in white,not color,probably because I watched it on a black and white TV! Remember those?

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : August 31, 2012 6:05 pm

Not many people could look convincint casually shooting a BAR from the shoulder – sucker weighs about 20 pounds even without the infrared scope. Heston was up to the task.
Even as a preteen, I had the hots for Our Miss Brooks, too.
Did you know “Killdozer” was based on a Theodore Sturgeon story from the 40s?

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : August 31, 2012 6:05 pm

Not many people could look convincint casually shooting a BAR from the shoulder – sucker weighs about 20 pounds even without the infrared scope. Heston was up to the task.
Even as a preteen, I had the hots for Our Miss Brooks, too.
Did you know “Killdozer” was based on a Theodore Sturgeon story from the 40s?

Posted By tdraicer : August 31, 2012 7:17 pm

Great list. If I’m going to single out one person it, I’ll go with James Donald. Big role (Quatermass and the Pit) or small (The Royal Hunt of the Sun) he was never less than spot-on.

Posted By tdraicer : August 31, 2012 7:17 pm

Great list. If I’m going to single out one person it, I’ll go with James Donald. Big role (Quatermass and the Pit) or small (The Royal Hunt of the Sun) he was never less than spot-on.

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : August 31, 2012 8:57 pm

I always love seeing James Donald as Prince Egbert in “The Vikings.” He appears to have wandered in from another movie entirely, but seems to be having a good time anyway.

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : August 31, 2012 8:57 pm

I always love seeing James Donald as Prince Egbert in “The Vikings.” He appears to have wandered in from another movie entirely, but seems to be having a good time anyway.

Posted By idlemendacity : August 31, 2012 9:05 pm

If I could go back in time and make one romantic comedy during the Studio Era it would be one starring Eve Arden and Ralph Bellamy. Two good looking actors (I agree Eve was a hottie especially in the 30s) with GREAT comic skills and yet stuck playing the wise-cracking best friend or losing man to the usual hero or heroine.

Posted By idlemendacity : August 31, 2012 9:05 pm

If I could go back in time and make one romantic comedy during the Studio Era it would be one starring Eve Arden and Ralph Bellamy. Two good looking actors (I agree Eve was a hottie especially in the 30s) with GREAT comic skills and yet stuck playing the wise-cracking best friend or losing man to the usual hero or heroine.

Posted By bmj2k : August 31, 2012 11:51 pm

Interesting that you put Vincent Price together with Eve Arden. To me, there is such a similarity to their voices, a similar texture and cadence. Just listen to Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks or anywhere else and you can hear Vincent Price in it.

Posted By bmj2k : August 31, 2012 11:51 pm

Interesting that you put Vincent Price together with Eve Arden. To me, there is such a similarity to their voices, a similar texture and cadence. Just listen to Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks or anywhere else and you can hear Vincent Price in it.

Posted By critt791 : September 1, 2012 4:25 am

Ah the Omega Man movie and my favorite character actor Anthony Zerbe. As a teen I saw the film with my girlfriend and she is really freaked out with the eyes the ‘family’ members had, really scared. By chance the very next morning we went to Magic Mountain theme park in CA. I’m giving her tips on shooting at the shooting gallery and the guy next to us with his two sons complains she’s shooting HIS targets. As the guy turns to face her it is none other than Zerbe! The poor girl jumps a foot in the air and all had a good laugh at her expense. Mr Zerbe gives a wink and we had a story to tell when we got home. Priceless.

Posted By critt791 : September 1, 2012 4:25 am

Ah the Omega Man movie and my favorite character actor Anthony Zerbe. As a teen I saw the film with my girlfriend and she is really freaked out with the eyes the ‘family’ members had, really scared. By chance the very next morning we went to Magic Mountain theme park in CA. I’m giving her tips on shooting at the shooting gallery and the guy next to us with his two sons complains she’s shooting HIS targets. As the guy turns to face her it is none other than Zerbe! The poor girl jumps a foot in the air and all had a good laugh at her expense. Mr Zerbe gives a wink and we had a story to tell when we got home. Priceless.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : September 1, 2012 11:50 am

That is an inarguably great story.

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : September 1, 2012 11:50 am

That is an inarguably great story.

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : September 1, 2012 12:07 pm

My favorite ever Anthony Zerbe scene: In “Who’ll Stop the Rain?” Zerbe, as the horrendously corrupt fed Antheil, interrogates the totally cluless Michael Moriarty about his equally clueless wife, Tuesday Weld. The couple have gotten themselves into a heroin-smuggling scheme where they are utterly out of their depth. Moriarty says of his wife, “I think she’s basically a very moral person.” Antheil repeats, deadpan, “Basically a very moral person.” He shakes his head and says, “Jesus, what a pair of yo-yos.”
You have to hear how Zerbe delivers that line to catch its full hilarity.

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : September 1, 2012 12:07 pm

My favorite ever Anthony Zerbe scene: In “Who’ll Stop the Rain?” Zerbe, as the horrendously corrupt fed Antheil, interrogates the totally cluless Michael Moriarty about his equally clueless wife, Tuesday Weld. The couple have gotten themselves into a heroin-smuggling scheme where they are utterly out of their depth. Moriarty says of his wife, “I think she’s basically a very moral person.” Antheil repeats, deadpan, “Basically a very moral person.” He shakes his head and says, “Jesus, what a pair of yo-yos.”
You have to hear how Zerbe delivers that line to catch its full hilarity.

Posted By Jenni : September 1, 2012 5:19 pm

Great post and Happy Birthday. I want to find the film that has Vincent Price and Eve Arden in it. Loved Killdozer! I remember watching it with my brother on an ABC Movie of the week. I also love The Three Godfathers, starring Wayne, Armendiaz, and Carey Jr. A simple story but very touching and Ford got great performances from all actors in that film. University in our town shows free films on Tuesday nights and Bullet is on the list, which I’ve never seen. To see it on a big screen, that’s how I’ll view it.

Posted By Jenni : September 1, 2012 5:19 pm

Great post and Happy Birthday. I want to find the film that has Vincent Price and Eve Arden in it. Loved Killdozer! I remember watching it with my brother on an ABC Movie of the week. I also love The Three Godfathers, starring Wayne, Armendiaz, and Carey Jr. A simple story but very touching and Ford got great performances from all actors in that film. University in our town shows free films on Tuesday nights and Bullet is on the list, which I’ve never seen. To see it on a big screen, that’s how I’ll view it.

Posted By AE : September 1, 2012 11:12 pm

I got an ice cream headache just reading this! Happy birthday, dear fella.

Posted By AE : September 1, 2012 11:12 pm

I got an ice cream headache just reading this! Happy birthday, dear fella.

Posted By Pamela Porter : September 3, 2012 12:45 pm

Zerbe is great. He is alternately stupid, cagey and utterly repellent as the corrupt cop who is sleeping with (and beating up on) Lola Falana as Roscoe Lee Browne’s wife in “The Liberation of LB Jones”. In real life, Zerbe & Browne were best friends.

Posted By Pamela Porter : September 3, 2012 12:45 pm

Zerbe is great. He is alternately stupid, cagey and utterly repellent as the corrupt cop who is sleeping with (and beating up on) Lola Falana as Roscoe Lee Browne’s wife in “The Liberation of LB Jones”. In real life, Zerbe & Browne were best friends.

Posted By woodworks : September 4, 2012 3:39 am

Charleton Heston does wonders in the Omega Man. I think there is a sort of remake of the OM, but it doesn’t do the original justice at all.

Posted By woodworks : September 4, 2012 3:39 am

Charleton Heston does wonders in the Omega Man. I think there is a sort of remake of the OM, but it doesn’t do the original justice at all.

Posted By vp19 : September 4, 2012 9:08 am

You’re apparently not alone in your lust for Eve Arden. I believe that in her autobiography, she tells of being at a service station when Clark Gable stops by and tries to pitch woo to her -- at the time he was married to Carole Lombard (I’m not certain whether this came before, during or after they collaborated on the underrated “Comrade X”). That anecdote may say more about Gable’s libido than on the relative merits of Arden vs. Lombard, but just being in the same sex-appeal conversation with Carole certainly says something about this lady Eve.

Posted By vp19 : September 4, 2012 9:08 am

You’re apparently not alone in your lust for Eve Arden. I believe that in her autobiography, she tells of being at a service station when Clark Gable stops by and tries to pitch woo to her -- at the time he was married to Carole Lombard (I’m not certain whether this came before, during or after they collaborated on the underrated “Comrade X”). That anecdote may say more about Gable’s libido than on the relative merits of Arden vs. Lombard, but just being in the same sex-appeal conversation with Carole certainly says something about this lady Eve.

Posted By robbushblog : September 15, 2012 12:04 pm

I find Eve Arden attractive too, but I must say I prefer the softer, more feminine type that you do not. She was a helluva great actress though.

Posted By robbushblog : September 15, 2012 12:04 pm

I find Eve Arden attractive too, but I must say I prefer the softer, more feminine type that you do not. She was a helluva great actress though.

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