Toshiro Mifune, Japan’s John Wayne

During Toshiro Mifune’s impressive career in front of the camera he was often referred to as the “John Wayne of Japan.” Like Wayne, Mifune was a powerful and commanding screen presence and one of his country’s biggest box-office stars. His rugged good looks and macho posturing seemed to represent a distinct kind of masculine ideal that post WW2 film audiences found particularly attractive. Both Wayne and Mifune often played characters that were tough, strong-willed, courageous, self-sacrificing and more than willing to carry the weight of the world on their shoulders. They also shared a sense of humor and natural confidence that allowed them to occasionally take on challenging roles that threatened to tarnish their universal appeal.

While John Wayne made a name for himself as a star of popular westerns often directed by John Ford, Mifune became best known for his convincing portrayal of samurai warriors in Akira Kurosawa’s films. Many of Kurosawa’s samurai epics were broadly influenced by Ford’s westerns, while Mifune’s performances often shared a similar swagger and assertion with John Wayne. As author Richard D. McGhee points out in his book John Wayne: Actor, Artist, Hero, both Wayne and Mifune were recognizable for their boldness, arrogance and determination. Few actors can turn their back to a camera without getting lost on screen but Wayne and Mifune could effortlessly became part of a film’s landscape. Their performances were organic in the sense that they used their bodies to convey authority and character instead of relying on close-ups and mouthfuls of dialogue to breathe life into their roles.

Two of Toshiro Mifune’s most iconic film appearances can be found in Kurosawa’s SEVEN SAMURAI (1954), which eventually became the inspiration for John Sturges’ THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960) and YOJIMBO (1961), which inspired Sergio Leone to make his first spaghetti western, A FISTFULL OF DOLLARS (1964). But it would take another seven years before Mifune would star in his own genre-defying western, Terence Young’s RED SUN (aka Soleil rouge; 1971). While RED SUN might not be as renowned or skillfully executed as John Ford’s or Akira Kurosawa’s best films, it does possess its own kind of charm.

In RED SUN Toshiro Mifune plays a samurai guard protecting the Japanese ambassador who is traveling across America to meet President Ulysses S. Grant and bring him a special katana (Japanese ceremonial sword) as a gift. When bandits overtake their train and a ruthless outlaw named Gauche (Alain Delon) steals the sword, Mifune is forced to team-up with Charles Bronson to get the sword back, but there’s a twist. Mifune’s character only has a week to return the sword to the ambassador or he’ll be forced to commit harakiri (aka seppuku – a Japanese form of suicide) for dishonoring his country. Mifune and Bronson set out on a cross country adventure playing reluctant compadres who end up leaving a trail of dead bodies in their wake before they finally encounter Gauche again. In a spectacular finale involving Gauche’s love interest (Ursula Andress) and a small army of Comanche Indians, the three leading men fight for their lives and the missing sword but only one of them is left standing.

British director Terence Young often seemed to approach filmmaking with his tongue firmly planted in his cheek. RED SUN never takes itself too seriously and the jokes fly almost as quickly as the bullets. Unfortunately some of the humor falls flat and the direction occasionally feels uninspired. Young had made a name for himself shooting exciting action and adventure films, including the wildly successful James Bond pictures, but RED SUN was his first and only western and that probably didn’t work in his favor. The film relies too heavily on Maurice Jarre’s limited score to generate ambiance and it’s been criticized for its thoughtless portrayal of women and American Indians, which seem dated today but it was undoubtedly a tough film to manage. Both the cast and crew were international and four different writers compiled the script while countless studios handled the film’s distribution. This  jumble of different cultures, languages and ideas combined with a restricted budget was apparent in many spaghetti westerns of the period and RED SUN had to overcome similar obstacles.

Minor faults aside, Young was able to assemble an impressive cast for his movie that brought together two stars from SEVEN SAMURAI and THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN for the first time. This was a wise move and makes the film an unprecedented treat for western buffs who probably never thought they’d see Toshiro Mifune and Charles Bronson in the same picture. Mifune, Bronson and Delon were rarely allowed to show their lighthearted side on screen but they seem to be enjoying themselves during the making of RED SUN and it’s just plain fun to watch the actors exchange humorous barbs and off-color jokes. Delon’s performance is surprisingly chilling at times and to his credit he was able to use his ‘ice-cold angel’ persona to make Gouche seem like a real threat. Bronson delivers a solid performance playing a character that he was undoubtedly all too familiar with and Ursula Andress is effective as Gouche’s unpredictable girlfriend. But in the end it’s Mifune who ends up being the most memorable character in the film. His stoic stance as he tries to maneuver through a world that’s not particularly friendly and downright confusing at times is admirable. The Bushido code doesn’t seem to have a place in the wild west but Mifune makes us believe that it should. He also has the best love scene in the film with a prostitute (Monica Randall) and he effortlessly executes every sword fight and judo chop like a champion.

Both Bronson and Delon had worked together before on the entertaining crime thriller, FAREWELL, FRIEND (1968) and the two actors became close during filming. Their friendly banter seems natural and unaffected in RED SUN and this feeling is echoed in the way they interact with Mifune. Delon has spoken fondly about his working relationship with Mifune on the set and has referred to the Japanese actor as a consummate professional who was like a “big brother” to him. Both Toshiro Mifune and Charles Bronson were at least 50 years old when they made RED SUN and Alain Delon was about 10 years younger than them both so it’s not too surprising that Delon found himself looking up to his costar. Delon had also developed a personal interest in Japanese culture during the making of LE SAMOURAI (1967) and that undoubtedly added to his deep admiration for Toshiro Mifune.

When RED SUN opened in the US it quickly left theaters and the critical response was lukewarm at best. But the film was a hit with international audiences particularly in Japan and Europe. That’s not too surprising because Mifune, Bronson and Delon were much more popular with Japanese and European filmgoers than they ever were here in the states. I found this out for myself during a trip to Japan. While roaming around various film memorabilia shops in Tokyo I was astonished by the amount of Alain Delon and Charles Bronson film memorabilia on display alongside plentiful items associated with Toshiro Mifune. These actors generated the kind of respect that similar shops in Hollywood reserve for actors like James Dean, Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro. RED SUN undoubtedly added to Bronson’s and Delon’s mystique in the land of rising sun because Japanese audiences could appreciate the film in ways that were lost on American viewers. Today RED SUN is a minor cult favorite among fans of ‘60s and ‘70s westerns but it’s a fascinating milestone in Toshiro Mifune’s impressive career. If you want to see the “John Wayne of Japan” ride a horse and sit around a campfire while he fights off banditos and hostile Indians, RED SUN is your answer.

Unfortunately RED SUN isn’t airing during the Toshiro Mifune ‘Summer Under the Stars’ celebration on TCM but it’s readily available on DVD. In the meantime you’ll find plenty of great Mifune movies to watch on TCM today. Last but not least, I hope you’ve enjoyed this weeklong Movie Morlocks’ blogathon devoted to Mifune and with a little luck it will encourage some readers to seek out more of the actor’s films.

58 Responses Toshiro Mifune, Japan’s John Wayne
Posted By kimalysong : August 9, 2012 11:57 am

I can see the connection between Wayne and Mifune, especially since Kurosawa’s samurai films felt like the Westerns (or Easterns if you will) of Japan to me. I also think Kurosawa was influenced a little by Ford.

However Mifune was just as great in modern day settings as he was in Samurai films. Some of my favorite Mifune performances are in Kurosawa’s noirs.

Hence I think what made Mifune such a great actor was not just his larger than life presence but also his versatility. He seemed comfortable playing many different types of roles. In one role he could be the character who gave guidance and in another he could be the character who needed guidance.

Posted By kimalysong : August 9, 2012 11:57 am

I can see the connection between Wayne and Mifune, especially since Kurosawa’s samurai films felt like the Westerns (or Easterns if you will) of Japan to me. I also think Kurosawa was influenced a little by Ford.

However Mifune was just as great in modern day settings as he was in Samurai films. Some of my favorite Mifune performances are in Kurosawa’s noirs.

Hence I think what made Mifune such a great actor was not just his larger than life presence but also his versatility. He seemed comfortable playing many different types of roles. In one role he could be the character who gave guidance and in another he could be the character who needed guidance.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 1:02 pm

My own personal favorite Kurosawa/Mifune films are the crime films HIGH AND LOW and STRAY DOG, which I’ve written about in-depth before so I wanted to focus on his contributions to westerns with this piece. Mifune was a more versatile actor than Wayne but the two men were often compared throughout their careers for reasons I hopefully made clear. I also wanted to give classic film fans an easy reference point to understanding Mifune’s influences as a performer. At least that was my goal with this piece.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 1:02 pm

My own personal favorite Kurosawa/Mifune films are the crime films HIGH AND LOW and STRAY DOG, which I’ve written about in-depth before so I wanted to focus on his contributions to westerns with this piece. Mifune was a more versatile actor than Wayne but the two men were often compared throughout their careers for reasons I hopefully made clear. I also wanted to give classic film fans an easy reference point to understanding Mifune’s influences as a performer. At least that was my goal with this piece.

Posted By Ghijath Naddaf : August 9, 2012 1:38 pm

Kurosawa was not just a little influenced by Ford.
He named him repeatly as his greatest Influence.
Ford heard about that,and visited Kurosawa one Day.
Bringing a Bottle of Whiskey.
I wish i could have been a Fly at the Wall at that Meeting.

Posted By Ghijath Naddaf : August 9, 2012 1:38 pm

Kurosawa was not just a little influenced by Ford.
He named him repeatly as his greatest Influence.
Ford heard about that,and visited Kurosawa one Day.
Bringing a Bottle of Whiskey.
I wish i could have been a Fly at the Wall at that Meeting.

Posted By carla : August 9, 2012 1:38 pm

looking forward to renting red sun. huge mifune fan here and forgot it was his day today. what a great thursday.

Posted By carla : August 9, 2012 1:38 pm

looking forward to renting red sun. huge mifune fan here and forgot it was his day today. what a great thursday.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 2:03 pm

Ghijath – Agreed, which is why I clearly wrote in my piece: “Many of Kurosawa’s samurai epics were broadly influenced by Ford’s westerns.” Kurosawa also admitted that he started dressing like Ford after they met.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 2:03 pm

Ghijath – Agreed, which is why I clearly wrote in my piece: “Many of Kurosawa’s samurai epics were broadly influenced by Ford’s westerns.” Kurosawa also admitted that he started dressing like Ford after they met.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 2:04 pm

carla – Hope you enjoy the film when you get a chance to see it! RED SUN is a lot of fun and Mifune’s great in it.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 2:04 pm

carla – Hope you enjoy the film when you get a chance to see it! RED SUN is a lot of fun and Mifune’s great in it.

Posted By carol : August 9, 2012 2:22 pm

One of the greatest pleasures in my cinematic life has been the scene in which Toshiro Mifune, with great dignity and precision, cusses out Charles Bronson in English. Thanks for focusing on Mifune’s impact on Westerns and on Red Sun in particular.

Posted By carol : August 9, 2012 2:22 pm

One of the greatest pleasures in my cinematic life has been the scene in which Toshiro Mifune, with great dignity and precision, cusses out Charles Bronson in English. Thanks for focusing on Mifune’s impact on Westerns and on Red Sun in particular.

Posted By kimalysong : August 9, 2012 2:29 pm

“Mifune was a more versatile actor than Wayne but the two men were often compared throughout their careers for reasons I hopefully made clear.”

I wasn’t really trying to downgrade Wayne in my comment, I was just pointing out that while I can definitely see the link between Wayne in Westerns and Mifune in Samurai films; I think overall there is a larger difference in their body of work. Hence I am not really sure Mifune is the John Wayne of Japan. He is something different in my opinion.

And High & Low is also one of my favorites.

@Ghijath Perhaps saying Kurosawa was only a little influenced by Ford was the wrong choice of words. However I was only mentioning the influence not trying to quantify it.

I don’t know why but I mostly prefer Kurosawa to Ford. Perhaps because I felt Kurosawa’s films had a nice blend of Eastern and Western culture (not just taking things from American westerns, but also Noir, Shakespeare, Russian literature, etc and then combining them with things that are culturally Japanese).

Posted By kimalysong : August 9, 2012 2:29 pm

“Mifune was a more versatile actor than Wayne but the two men were often compared throughout their careers for reasons I hopefully made clear.”

I wasn’t really trying to downgrade Wayne in my comment, I was just pointing out that while I can definitely see the link between Wayne in Westerns and Mifune in Samurai films; I think overall there is a larger difference in their body of work. Hence I am not really sure Mifune is the John Wayne of Japan. He is something different in my opinion.

And High & Low is also one of my favorites.

@Ghijath Perhaps saying Kurosawa was only a little influenced by Ford was the wrong choice of words. However I was only mentioning the influence not trying to quantify it.

I don’t know why but I mostly prefer Kurosawa to Ford. Perhaps because I felt Kurosawa’s films had a nice blend of Eastern and Western culture (not just taking things from American westerns, but also Noir, Shakespeare, Russian literature, etc and then combining them with things that are culturally Japanese).

Posted By kimalysong : August 9, 2012 2:31 pm

On another note I have not seen Red Sun but I would love too since I am a fan of the 3 main actors. Hopefully TCM will play this film in the future.

Posted By kimalysong : August 9, 2012 2:31 pm

On another note I have not seen Red Sun but I would love too since I am a fan of the 3 main actors. Hopefully TCM will play this film in the future.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 2:46 pm

Carol – Mifune & Bronson share a lot of great moments in the film! In retrospect Bronson got cussed out a lot in RED SUN. I lost track of how many times Ursula Andress called him a “bastard.” And glad you enjoyed the piece. It’s great to know that RED SUN has more fans.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 2:46 pm

Carol – Mifune & Bronson share a lot of great moments in the film! In retrospect Bronson got cussed out a lot in RED SUN. I lost track of how many times Ursula Andress called him a “bastard.” And glad you enjoyed the piece. It’s great to know that RED SUN has more fans.

Posted By Medusa : August 9, 2012 4:37 pm

I’ve wanted to see this, too, especially after doing research on Mifune! Great write-up!

Posted By Medusa : August 9, 2012 4:37 pm

I’ve wanted to see this, too, especially after doing research on Mifune! Great write-up!

Posted By Medusa : August 9, 2012 4:41 pm

I wanted to let everybody know that “Red Sun” appears to be available (in several parts) on YouTube, for instant gratification. Search for it!

Posted By Medusa : August 9, 2012 4:41 pm

I wanted to let everybody know that “Red Sun” appears to be available (in several parts) on YouTube, for instant gratification. Search for it!

Posted By Mike Perry : August 9, 2012 5:42 pm

Nice piece on the Mifune/Duke connection that evolves into an article on Red Sun. Growing up a Bronson fan in the late 70′s this was a film I always looked for on late night t.v. I was aware of Mifune but this was my first look at him which lead to the other American based films he made like Hell in the Pacific etc. Then I found a video store that carried the Kurosawa films and they blew me away.
I can’t discuss Red Sun without mentioning Bronson having an opportunity to display some charm that he never showed too often. He is fun in the film with tongue in cheek and takes it in stride when Toshiro kicks his a… The only films Charlie seemed to show this side of himself besides this one were his mid 70′s output of From Noon Till Three, Breakout and St. Ives. After that he let those type of roles go and never seemed to smile at the camera again. Too bad.
Search them out and a Mifune flick called Samurai Rebellion is one I really like that is not a Kurosawa film.
Thanks for taking the time to read my clip.

Posted By Mike Perry : August 9, 2012 5:42 pm

Nice piece on the Mifune/Duke connection that evolves into an article on Red Sun. Growing up a Bronson fan in the late 70′s this was a film I always looked for on late night t.v. I was aware of Mifune but this was my first look at him which lead to the other American based films he made like Hell in the Pacific etc. Then I found a video store that carried the Kurosawa films and they blew me away.
I can’t discuss Red Sun without mentioning Bronson having an opportunity to display some charm that he never showed too often. He is fun in the film with tongue in cheek and takes it in stride when Toshiro kicks his a… The only films Charlie seemed to show this side of himself besides this one were his mid 70′s output of From Noon Till Three, Breakout and St. Ives. After that he let those type of roles go and never seemed to smile at the camera again. Too bad.
Search them out and a Mifune flick called Samurai Rebellion is one I really like that is not a Kurosawa film.
Thanks for taking the time to read my clip.

Posted By swac44 : August 9, 2012 6:40 pm

Sadly, the only DVDs I can find online in North America are subpar Asian imports that some reviews call “borderline bootlegs” with low-def transfers and out-of-sync sound. If you have an all-region player, there’s a UK DVD of Red Sun from Optimum which is legit (they’ve licensed a number of key Hollywood westerns from major studios which haven’t been released on these shores) although it’s bare-bones, with no extras.

I’ve put it on my wish list, so I can say “Here comes Red Sun” when I do up my next Amazon.co.uk order.

Posted By swac44 : August 9, 2012 6:40 pm

Sadly, the only DVDs I can find online in North America are subpar Asian imports that some reviews call “borderline bootlegs” with low-def transfers and out-of-sync sound. If you have an all-region player, there’s a UK DVD of Red Sun from Optimum which is legit (they’ve licensed a number of key Hollywood westerns from major studios which haven’t been released on these shores) although it’s bare-bones, with no extras.

I’ve put it on my wish list, so I can say “Here comes Red Sun” when I do up my next Amazon.co.uk order.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 6:48 pm

Medusa – Thanks! Hopefully the folks at youtube will leave the film up long enough for a few folks to check it out.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 6:48 pm

Medusa – Thanks! Hopefully the folks at youtube will leave the film up long enough for a few folks to check it out.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 6:56 pm

Mike – Thanks, Mike. I appreciate the feedback. I hope folks understand that I was merely using the comparison to Wayne that was made throughout Mifune’s lifetime to illustrate what they had in common. I wasn’t trying to pigeonhole him. I also wanted to highlight Mifune’s contributions (directly & indirectly) to the western genre. In some way he’s as important as Wayne was in defining our modern interpretation of a classic “cowboy.”

Bronson really does seem to be having fun on the set of RED SUN. And you’re right, he got progressively ‘harder’ as he aged until he rarely if ever smiled. I have not seen SAMURAI REBELLION yet but it’s playing on TCM tonight so hopefully I can catch up with it then! Thanks for recommending it.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 6:56 pm

Mike – Thanks, Mike. I appreciate the feedback. I hope folks understand that I was merely using the comparison to Wayne that was made throughout Mifune’s lifetime to illustrate what they had in common. I wasn’t trying to pigeonhole him. I also wanted to highlight Mifune’s contributions (directly & indirectly) to the western genre. In some way he’s as important as Wayne was in defining our modern interpretation of a classic “cowboy.”

Bronson really does seem to be having fun on the set of RED SUN. And you’re right, he got progressively ‘harder’ as he aged until he rarely if ever smiled. I have not seen SAMURAI REBELLION yet but it’s playing on TCM tonight so hopefully I can catch up with it then! Thanks for recommending it.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 7:03 pm

SWAC – I read somewhere that the best DVD of RED SUN was released in Europe (not sure if the DVD was Belgium, Austrian or some other country entirely) and it may even include an interview with Bronson. Of course I can’t confirm that so take the information with a grain of salt. My own DVD copy isn’t worth recommending since it’s also bare-bones and of questionable quality.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 9, 2012 7:03 pm

SWAC – I read somewhere that the best DVD of RED SUN was released in Europe (not sure if the DVD was Belgium, Austrian or some other country entirely) and it may even include an interview with Bronson. Of course I can’t confirm that so take the information with a grain of salt. My own DVD copy isn’t worth recommending since it’s also bare-bones and of questionable quality.

Posted By swac44 : August 9, 2012 8:01 pm

There probably is an excellent DVD of it released in Europe, there are several fine spaghetti western releases coming out of Germany these days but are hard to track down through regular channels. I’d go with the Optimum UK DVD, they’ve released some great otherwise unavailable titles licensed from various studios like John Sturges’ Backlash with Richard Widmark, Fritz Lang’s Western Union and Budd Boetticher’s Seminole, with Rock Hudson and Lee Marvin (which recently surfaced via Universal’s MOD Vault Series, a number of years after it was first released overseas).

I’d happily buy legit North American copies of these titles, but aside from a few like Seminole, and the Robert Mitchum western The Man With the Gun most of the Optimum titles remain available only over the pond.

Hmm…looks like there’s a German DVD of Red Sunfrom Kinowelt, I have some of their superb Laurel & Hardy releases, but this one is reportedly full-screen and disappointing overall with some egregious soundtrack issues. An Amazon.de commentor says the Dutch release is better (wasn’t Figures In a Landscape a Dutch-only release?), but I can’t actually find one of those anywhere.

Posted By swac44 : August 9, 2012 8:01 pm

There probably is an excellent DVD of it released in Europe, there are several fine spaghetti western releases coming out of Germany these days but are hard to track down through regular channels. I’d go with the Optimum UK DVD, they’ve released some great otherwise unavailable titles licensed from various studios like John Sturges’ Backlash with Richard Widmark, Fritz Lang’s Western Union and Budd Boetticher’s Seminole, with Rock Hudson and Lee Marvin (which recently surfaced via Universal’s MOD Vault Series, a number of years after it was first released overseas).

I’d happily buy legit North American copies of these titles, but aside from a few like Seminole, and the Robert Mitchum western The Man With the Gun most of the Optimum titles remain available only over the pond.

Hmm…looks like there’s a German DVD of Red Sunfrom Kinowelt, I have some of their superb Laurel & Hardy releases, but this one is reportedly full-screen and disappointing overall with some egregious soundtrack issues. An Amazon.de commentor says the Dutch release is better (wasn’t Figures In a Landscape a Dutch-only release?), but I can’t actually find one of those anywhere.

Posted By Mike Perry : August 9, 2012 11:03 pm

Kimberly….hope u enjoy Rebellion as much as I did seeing it for the first time.
DVD of Red Sun.
My copy came out of Korea and it is a fine print. It appears to be a licensed copy and comes in a case that also slides into a box case. Nice artwork. Recommended. Seller is everdvd. I have purchased about a dozen titles I couldn’t find in N.A. and haven’t been disappointed yet.

Posted By Mike Perry : August 9, 2012 11:03 pm

Kimberly….hope u enjoy Rebellion as much as I did seeing it for the first time.
DVD of Red Sun.
My copy came out of Korea and it is a fine print. It appears to be a licensed copy and comes in a case that also slides into a box case. Nice artwork. Recommended. Seller is everdvd. I have purchased about a dozen titles I couldn’t find in N.A. and haven’t been disappointed yet.

Posted By andrewnette : August 10, 2012 2:20 am

Another terrific piece, Kimberly. Thanks. I love Mifune. Imagine how happy I was when I found he was in a film with Bronson, Andress and Delon. I saw Red Sun ages ago and really enjoyed it. Most of the current genre mash ups little pretty pale in comparison.
Cheers,
Andrew

Posted By andrewnette : August 10, 2012 2:20 am

Another terrific piece, Kimberly. Thanks. I love Mifune. Imagine how happy I was when I found he was in a film with Bronson, Andress and Delon. I saw Red Sun ages ago and really enjoyed it. Most of the current genre mash ups little pretty pale in comparison.
Cheers,
Andrew

Posted By Ghijath Naddaf : August 10, 2012 3:35 am

It´s on youtube, in one part now too.

Posted By Ghijath Naddaf : August 10, 2012 3:35 am

It´s on youtube, in one part now too.

Posted By Juana Maria : August 10, 2012 1:48 pm

I am so glad someone wrote an article about “Red Sun”!! It is one of my favorite Mifune pictures! I have found it on You Tube! I think Greg Ferrara needs to watch it!

Posted By Juana Maria : August 10, 2012 1:48 pm

I am so glad someone wrote an article about “Red Sun”!! It is one of my favorite Mifune pictures! I have found it on You Tube! I think Greg Ferrara needs to watch it!

Posted By Jenni : August 10, 2012 11:34 pm

Thanks for this posting about Red Sun. It sounds great, strong cast, interesting plot. I’m going to check out what there is of it on You Tube. Hoping someone at Netflix will add it to the streaming menu. Bronson, Mifune, Delon, Ursula! What a cast!

Posted By Jenni : August 10, 2012 11:34 pm

Thanks for this posting about Red Sun. It sounds great, strong cast, interesting plot. I’m going to check out what there is of it on You Tube. Hoping someone at Netflix will add it to the streaming menu. Bronson, Mifune, Delon, Ursula! What a cast!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 11, 2012 8:34 pm

swac – I believe it might have been the Dutch DVD that I read about but I can’t be certain. I can’t seem to find any reference to a DVD that includes an interview with Bronson so I’m not sure when or how I got that idea into my head.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 11, 2012 8:34 pm

swac – I believe it might have been the Dutch DVD that I read about but I can’t be certain. I can’t seem to find any reference to a DVD that includes an interview with Bronson so I’m not sure when or how I got that idea into my head.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 11, 2012 8:41 pm

Mike – Just wanted to let you know that I watched Samurai Rebellion & loved it! Great movie and I was especially impressed with the photography and soundtrack. It’s quickly entered the ranks of “my favorite Mifune films.” I’ve seen two of the director’s other films (Kwaidan & Harakiri) and enjoyed them both so I don’t know what took me so long to catch up with Samurai Rebellion but I’m glad I did.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 11, 2012 8:41 pm

Mike – Just wanted to let you know that I watched Samurai Rebellion & loved it! Great movie and I was especially impressed with the photography and soundtrack. It’s quickly entered the ranks of “my favorite Mifune films.” I’ve seen two of the director’s other films (Kwaidan & Harakiri) and enjoyed them both so I don’t know what took me so long to catch up with Samurai Rebellion but I’m glad I did.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 11, 2012 8:45 pm

Andrew, Juana & Jenni – Thanks for the kind words & I’m glad you enjoyed my look at RED SUN. It’s such a fun film & the cast is topnotch! I’m happy to know other folks appreciate the film too. Most of the reviews I’ve read seem to focus on what’s wrong with the movie instead of what works and there’s a lot to like about RED SUN.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : August 11, 2012 8:45 pm

Andrew, Juana & Jenni – Thanks for the kind words & I’m glad you enjoyed my look at RED SUN. It’s such a fun film & the cast is topnotch! I’m happy to know other folks appreciate the film too. Most of the reviews I’ve read seem to focus on what’s wrong with the movie instead of what works and there’s a lot to like about RED SUN.

Posted By Juana Maria : August 12, 2012 1:14 pm

Kimberly:Thanks for writing me! I am so glad to find someone besides myself who likes “Red Sun”. I love the cast,and I think it works. I think Charles Bronson was having a fun time! I love Mifune’s character too. Of course,Alian Delon is always a delight to look at! I’ve got kind of a crush on him. Ever since I first saw him in “Rocco & his Brothers”.

Posted By Juana Maria : August 12, 2012 1:14 pm

Kimberly:Thanks for writing me! I am so glad to find someone besides myself who likes “Red Sun”. I love the cast,and I think it works. I think Charles Bronson was having a fun time! I love Mifune’s character too. Of course,Alian Delon is always a delight to look at! I’ve got kind of a crush on him. Ever since I first saw him in “Rocco & his Brothers”.

Posted By Mike Perry : August 12, 2012 9:38 pm

Kimberly.

Glad u enjoyed it as much as I did on that first viewing. It’s always a treat to see a great movie for the first time.

Posted By Mike Perry : August 12, 2012 9:38 pm

Kimberly.

Glad u enjoyed it as much as I did on that first viewing. It’s always a treat to see a great movie for the first time.

Posted By The Duke: John Wayne – Through the Years | Serendipity : September 22, 2012 8:23 pm

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Posted By The Duke: John Wayne – Through the Years | Serendipity : September 22, 2012 8:23 pm

[...] Toshiro Mifune, Japan’s John Wayne (moviemorlocks.com) Share this:FacebookLinkedInPinterestTumblrStumbleUponEmailTwitterLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. This entry was posted in Life, Movies and tagged Arts, John Wayne, Stagecoach by Teepee12. Bookmark the permalink. [...]

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