Adventures at the TCM Classic Film Festival

Recovering from the TCM Classic Film Fest, which was held last weekend in Hollywood, took a few days, but it is now a glorious memory. The fest proved to be a communal experience, a learning opportunity, and a chance to reflect on the power of movies to connect us as a society and culture. Watching 14 movies in four days was exhausting but also rejuvenating.

LOST ON THE MEAN STREETS OF FILM NOIR. The fest included ten programming themes, and my friend Maryann and I managed to see at least one film from six of the programs. (By the way, attending with a friend is a must, because the urge to talk about the movies immediately after the screenings is overwhelming.) However, one theme attracted us more than the others—The Noir Style, programmed by author Eddie Muller, who is also the founder of the Noir Foundation. We watched four of Muller’s selections: Criss Cross, Cry Danger, Gun Crazy, and Raw Deal. In addition, we caught Fall Guy, a rare noir film that was not part of Muller’s program.

RICHARD ERDMAN IS TERRIFIC AS POWELL'S BUDDY DELONG IN 'CRY DANGER.'

The Film Noir Foundation was responsible for the restoration of Cry Danger (1950), which was produced by star Dick Powell. Powell began to produce films independently of the studios in post-WWII Hollywood because, according to Muller, he wanted to appear in darker, meatier roles than the studios were offering him. He found two major investors, who were credited as producers on Cry Danger, and he tapped editor Robert Parrish to direct, but the film is definitely Powell’s vision. I have always appreciated Powell’s ability to deliver well-written dialogue in a natural rhythm but with a tone or emphasis that can be funny, poignant, sarcastic, or dramatic, depending on the context. The dialogue by writer William Powers provided him with ample opportunity to crack wise with an all-knowing cynicism. Those who liked Powell in Murder, My Sweet will love him in Cry Danger. Powell stars as Rocky Mulloy, who is back in town after serving five years for armed robbery. He wants to clear his friend, who is still in prison for the same crime. No one believes Rocky is innocent, not even the witness who cleared him on a false alibi, and he still has a yen for his buddy’s glamorous wife, played by Rhonda Fleming in her first role. Richard Erdman costarred as Rocky’s newfound friend Delong, a cynical former Marine wounded in body and spirit during the war. The talented character actor matched Powell for delivering caustic wisecracks and glib one-liners, and their interplay provided an excellent example of Golden Age acting, which showcased the beauty of the written word. Fleming, one of my favorite stars, appeared in support of the film and told some wonderful stories about her career. Cry Danger turned out to be one of my favorites from the fest. It is now available on DVD; I can’t recommend it enough for noir fans.

TONY CURTIS DANCED HIS WAY INTO THE AUDIENCE'S HEARTS IN AN UNBILLED ROLE IN 'CRISS CROSS.'

Gun Crazy (1950), which I have seen several times, holds up remarkably well on repeated viewings, primarily because of Peggy Cummins’ star turn as the ultimate femme fatale, Annie Laurie Starr. Starr is so hard-boiled that she suggests to her husband that they use a toddler while on the lam because no one would dare shoot at them with a baby in tow! Cummins was interviewed before the screening, and it was fun to hear her speak about her career in Hollywood and her experiences on Gun Crazy. A native of Wales, Cummins left the U.S. for London in 1950 to marry and to work in the British film industry. The TCM fest marked her first visit to the States in 62 years. Anthony Mann’s Raw Deal (1948) proved so popular that it quickly sold out, and a second screening was added to the schedule on Sunday, which was the day we caught it. Unfortunately, Raw Deal costar Marsha Hunt did not return for the second screening, so we missed out on seeing our third noir actress. It would have been fun to compare and contrast their memories of appearing in these types of roles. I enjoyed Raw Deal because the voice-over narration was provided by the other female character, played by Claire Trevor, noir’s perpetual bad girl. I don’t recall seeing another noir in which the voice-over is from the point of view of the woman, and it was interesting to understand the skewed morality of the femme fatale archetype from a female perspective. Plus, John Alton’s beautiful low-key and high-contrast cinematography was quite effective on the big screen in a 35mm print.

'FALL GUY' STARRED CLIFFORD (LEO) PENN, SEAN'S FATHER.

I had never seen Criss Cross, starring a handsome and buff Burt Lancaster and a sultry Yvonne De Carlo, who took a break from her usual historical adventures to be the double-crossing dame who foils Lancaster’s heist. Unfortunately, I did not care for this noir, which lacked the sizzling characters and sharp dialogue generally found in the genre. I did enjoy the venal Dan Duryea, who wipes the screen with a morose, inert Lancaster. The best scene in the film features an uncredited Tony Curtis who rumbas with DeCarlo to a sexy Latin number in the hothouse atmosphere of a 1940s night club. It was the only scene in Criss Cross that generated any buzz in the audience.

CATCHING THE FALL GUY. Though not part of the Noir Style series, Fall Guy proved to be an interesting viewing experience because of the people involved in its production. A rare film about narcotics trafficking, Fall Guy starred Leo Penn (billed as Clifford Penn), the father of Sean and Chris Penn, in his first starring role. Penn was blacklisted during the mid-1950s but returned to television drama during the late 1950s. In the 1960s, he became a sought-after television director. Fall Guy marked the debut production of Walter Mirisch, the legendary producer responsible for everything from Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) to The Pink Panther to In the Heat of the Night. The 90-year-old Mirisch attended the screening, charming the audience with his humility as he apologized for the film’s weaknesses. Maryann and I sat in the second row during that screening, but that turned out to be a blessing when we were easily able to move down front to personally speak with Mirisch after the discussion. He was quite touched when he learned that both of us habitually show In the Heat of the Night in the film courses that we teach. Definitely a festival highlight for me.

BARRYMORE 'COUNSELLOR AT LAW' BUTTS HEAD WITH A YOUNG COMMUNIST, PLAYED BY FUTURE DIRECTOR VINCENT SHERMAN.

DISCOVERING A FORGOTTEN GEM. My favorite film of the entire festival turned out to be Counsellor at Law (1933), starring John Barrymore as a highly successful New York lawyer. Based on a play, the film was set entirely in Barrymore’s stylish, modern offices, which could have made for a stagy and static viewing experience. But young director William Wyler energized the material by using a constantly moving camera, which tracked with the characters as they scurry in and out of the offices, down the hallways, or across the reception area. Plus, the fast-paced dialogue, which reminded me of the rapid-fired delivery in Howard Hawks’s comedies Bringing Up Baby and His Girl Friday, was unusual for 1933—still considered the early sound era. And, audiences of the day surely got a kick out of the variety of accents and vocal inflections of the melting pot of characters that populate Counsellor at Law, especially Isabel Jewel as sassy receptionist Bessie Green. Barrymore was in top form as the high-powered lawyer who had worked his way out of poverty to his lofty position, though when he tells his story to the young immigrant Communist, the latter is not impressed. Counsellor at Law is a pre-Code film, and I doubt that their political bantering would have passed the Production Code the following year, when the Code would be enforced.

IN 'BLACK NARCISSUS,' KATHLEEN BYRON PLAYS SISTER RUTH, WHOSE ILLICIT PASSION FOR DAVID FARRAR IS INDICATED BY THE RED LIGHTING.

MORE HIGHLIGHTS. As an avid Martin Scorsese fan, I was excited to hear Scorsese’s long-time editor Thelma Schoonmaker speak on Black Narcissus, which was directed by her late husband Michael Powell. Scorsese sought out Powell in the late 1970s and sought his advice on Raging Bull as well as other films. Schoonmaker met Powell through Scorsese, and the young editor and aging director married. What a story! What a life. Schoonmaker preferred a Q&A with the audience over a post-screening chat with host Robert Osborne, and the knowledgeable audience asked intelligent questions about Powell and Scorsese. Schoonmaker was smart, articulate, and knew a great deal about her craft; listening to her was a learning experience. For example, Powell, like John Ford and Alfred Hitchcock, shot only one or two takes of each shot, so that the editor had little choice in the editing room, giving Powell control over the outcome of his films without stepping foot in the editing room. More poignantly, he was completely in love with Narcissus star Deborah Kerr, which made a significant if subtle impact on her performance.

DIRECTOR BLAKE EDWARDS MAKES GOOD USE OF THE WIDESCREEN IN 'THE PINK PANTHER.'

I may have been impressed with Schoonmaker, but I was completely starstruck when we wandered into a screening of The Pink Panther, and Robert Wagner strolled out to chat before the film. Handsome, suave, and charismatic, Wagner is one of the last of the old-school movie stars. I have seen The Pink Panther previously, but watching this Technirama comedy projected on a huge screen with an appreciative audience brought out the humor in director Blake Edwards’s well-timed and cleverly blocked sight gags. The timing and use of offscreen space simply do not translate to television, reinforcing my firmly held belief that there is no substitute for watching a film in the theater with a respectful audience. Another pleasant surprise of a different kind was Call Her Savage, a pre-Code talkie starring the outrageous Clara Bow. Bow’s character endured a notorious family history, a bad marriage to a cad who contracted venereal disease, the death of her child, and the snobbery of New York’s upper crust only to return home to the “half-breed” who had always loved her. And, she went through all of these misadventures very obviously bra-less. I admire Bow’s spirit, who was trying to make a comeback after scandal and industry changes had made her box-office poison. Long unavailable, Call Her Savage was restored by the Museum of Modern Art.

CLARA BOW ROCKED 'CALL HER SAVAGE.'

LAST CALL. We closed the fest by watching the silent film The Thief of Bagdad accompanied by the Mont Alto Orchestra at the Egyptian Theater. Jeffrey Vance, the author of the latest biography of Douglas Fairbanks, introduced the film with Ben Mankiewicz and revealed that the film had made its original debut at the Egyptian in 1924. Though directed by Raoul Walsh, Thief was the creative vision of Fairbanks, who hired young William Cameron Menzies to design the elaborate sets. He also approached the Thief differently than previous roles. Influenced by Serge Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes, he approached his performance like a dancer, with exaggerated but graceful moves that made his character more charming and his physical stunts more appealing.

A FINAL WORD. The only sour note to the whole festival was the weather, which was unseasonably cold. Plus, rain all day on Friday contributed to the difficulty of standing in line for over an hour for each film and to the head cold I have now. Consequently, tempers flared and chaos prevailed when too many people showed up for the initial screening of Raw Deal, and over 100 people were closed out after standing in the rain for at least 45 minutes. Considering the devotion of the fest-goers to TCM and these films, I suggest that the Powers That Be consider tents for future fests, which I have seen at other film festivals. But, that is a minor complaint. Over all, I thoroughly enjoyed seeing a wide range of well-known classics and unknown gems on the big screen introduced by stars or scholars. And, I am impressed at TCM’s commitment to restoration so that future generations can view these films the way they were intended.

0 Response Adventures at the TCM Classic Film Festival
Posted By Arthur : April 23, 2012 1:19 pm

Raw Deal and Counsellor-at-Law are two absolute gems that I discovered thanks to TCM. Gabriel Over the White House is another great forgotten film that TCM brought to light.

Posted By Arthur : April 23, 2012 1:19 pm

Raw Deal and Counsellor-at-Law are two absolute gems that I discovered thanks to TCM. Gabriel Over the White House is another great forgotten film that TCM brought to light.

Posted By jdhcinehistoryresearch : April 23, 2012 3:10 pm

I was only able to make it to LONESOME, a silent Paul Fejos film which I had been wanting to see for years (the 3 talking sequences are incredibly awful and detract from the charm and beauty of this astounding film which would make an interesting double feature with THE CROWD).

I think the name of Fairbanks’ biographer is Jeffrey Vance, not Banks.

Posted By jdhcinehistoryresearch : April 23, 2012 3:10 pm

I was only able to make it to LONESOME, a silent Paul Fejos film which I had been wanting to see for years (the 3 talking sequences are incredibly awful and detract from the charm and beauty of this astounding film which would make an interesting double feature with THE CROWD).

I think the name of Fairbanks’ biographer is Jeffrey Vance, not Banks.

Posted By Margaret Perry Movies : April 23, 2012 3:42 pm

‘ve just started a new blog about Katharine Hepburn! Can you check it out and let me know what you think of it so far?
http://thegreatkh.blogspot.com/

Posted By Margaret Perry Movies : April 23, 2012 3:42 pm

‘ve just started a new blog about Katharine Hepburn! Can you check it out and let me know what you think of it so far?
http://thegreatkh.blogspot.com/

Posted By Emgee : April 23, 2012 3:51 pm

Pretty surprised that you didn’t like Criss Cross, which is very highly rated by most noirfans, including me. Noir pundit Eddie Muller even calls it his second most favourite noir. Quote: “Stupidly, I used to think there was something missing at the core. But it keeps getting better ever time I see it.”
Should that matter to you? Not really, you either like it or you don’t.

I would love to see Counsellor at Law. Barrymore and Wyler, now that must be a winning combination.

Posted By Emgee : April 23, 2012 3:51 pm

Pretty surprised that you didn’t like Criss Cross, which is very highly rated by most noirfans, including me. Noir pundit Eddie Muller even calls it his second most favourite noir. Quote: “Stupidly, I used to think there was something missing at the core. But it keeps getting better ever time I see it.”
Should that matter to you? Not really, you either like it or you don’t.

I would love to see Counsellor at Law. Barrymore and Wyler, now that must be a winning combination.

Posted By Kingrat : April 23, 2012 4:28 pm

Susan, I’m so glad you got to the festival. Maybe it was first night excitement, but I loved CRISS CROSS, especially the energy and unusual storytelling of the opening, the wonderfully poetic heist scene with the gas masks, and the mixture of location shooting and studio work. The two shots of Yvonne DeCarlo at the window with the trolley climbing the hill in the distance, one during the day, one at night, were also special.

Thanks for writing about COUNSELLOR AT LAW, which I missed twice. But RAW DEAL was a treat, and BLACK NARCISSUS, and so many other films. I’ve posted about Thelma Schoonmaker’s comments in the General Discussions forum. Please add or correct anything that’s inaccurate.

Posted By Kingrat : April 23, 2012 4:28 pm

Susan, I’m so glad you got to the festival. Maybe it was first night excitement, but I loved CRISS CROSS, especially the energy and unusual storytelling of the opening, the wonderfully poetic heist scene with the gas masks, and the mixture of location shooting and studio work. The two shots of Yvonne DeCarlo at the window with the trolley climbing the hill in the distance, one during the day, one at night, were also special.

Thanks for writing about COUNSELLOR AT LAW, which I missed twice. But RAW DEAL was a treat, and BLACK NARCISSUS, and so many other films. I’ve posted about Thelma Schoonmaker’s comments in the General Discussions forum. Please add or correct anything that’s inaccurate.

Posted By Arthur : April 23, 2012 5:19 pm

The relationship between Rod Taylor and his secretary in the VIPs, is, I feel, based on the relationship between Barrymore and his secretary in Counselor At Law.

Posted By Arthur : April 23, 2012 5:19 pm

The relationship between Rod Taylor and his secretary in the VIPs, is, I feel, based on the relationship between Barrymore and his secretary in Counselor At Law.

Posted By jdhcinehistoryresearch : April 23, 2012 5:32 pm

COUNSELLOR AT LAW is available in a very nice DVD from Kino-not the same as watching in a theater but still worthy.

Posted By jdhcinehistoryresearch : April 23, 2012 5:32 pm

COUNSELLOR AT LAW is available in a very nice DVD from Kino-not the same as watching in a theater but still worthy.

Posted By dukeroberts : April 23, 2012 11:22 pm

I think Criss Cross is great. I especially like the actual heist scene. Oh well. I wish I could have been there to see those great movies.

I watched Cry Danger about a year or so ago and didn’t realize that Rhonda Fleming was still alive. I wonder why Erdman didn’t show up. Maybe Community hasn’t wrapped for the season and he was too busy.

I’ve never seen Raw Deal and by telling me how good it is it’s just rubbing it in. If it’s half as good as T-Men I will love it when I eventually see it.

Seeing Black Narcissus and The Pink Panther on the big screen must have been incredible. I should save up my pennies for next year’s fest.

Posted By dukeroberts : April 23, 2012 11:22 pm

I think Criss Cross is great. I especially like the actual heist scene. Oh well. I wish I could have been there to see those great movies.

I watched Cry Danger about a year or so ago and didn’t realize that Rhonda Fleming was still alive. I wonder why Erdman didn’t show up. Maybe Community hasn’t wrapped for the season and he was too busy.

I’ve never seen Raw Deal and by telling me how good it is it’s just rubbing it in. If it’s half as good as T-Men I will love it when I eventually see it.

Seeing Black Narcissus and The Pink Panther on the big screen must have been incredible. I should save up my pennies for next year’s fest.

Posted By Arthur : April 24, 2012 12:48 am

Not to worry. Raw Deal is available on Netflix and for purchase at a nominal price. It is seat of the pants, bare bones filmmaking, but it makes a virtue out of necessity. It achieves a degree of realism and artistry that is phenomenal. In 1948 Claire Trevor starred in both Key Largo and Raw Deal. Key Largo, though, was a big budget production and a good movie. But, for me, Raw Deal was the better film.

Two other excellent noirs shot on skeleton budgets are Blast of Silence (1961) and Killer’s Kiss (1954). The latter was Kubrick’s second feature, and it is a masterpiece, ditto Blast of Silence. BTW To Have And Have Not, though amply funded, did not have anywhere near the budget of Casablanca. Yet, many will say, and I am one, that To Have and Have Not was a much better picture.

Posted By Arthur : April 24, 2012 12:48 am

Not to worry. Raw Deal is available on Netflix and for purchase at a nominal price. It is seat of the pants, bare bones filmmaking, but it makes a virtue out of necessity. It achieves a degree of realism and artistry that is phenomenal. In 1948 Claire Trevor starred in both Key Largo and Raw Deal. Key Largo, though, was a big budget production and a good movie. But, for me, Raw Deal was the better film.

Two other excellent noirs shot on skeleton budgets are Blast of Silence (1961) and Killer’s Kiss (1954). The latter was Kubrick’s second feature, and it is a masterpiece, ditto Blast of Silence. BTW To Have And Have Not, though amply funded, did not have anywhere near the budget of Casablanca. Yet, many will say, and I am one, that To Have and Have Not was a much better picture.

Posted By dukeroberts : April 24, 2012 1:03 am

Raw Deal is not available on Netflix. There isn’t even a listing for it. There are two other movies names Raw Deal that are available. There is an Ah-nold movie and some movie about sex that are both names Raw Deal, but the movie written about in this article is not available.

Posted By dukeroberts : April 24, 2012 1:03 am

Raw Deal is not available on Netflix. There isn’t even a listing for it. There are two other movies names Raw Deal that are available. There is an Ah-nold movie and some movie about sex that are both names Raw Deal, but the movie written about in this article is not available.

Posted By Arthur : April 24, 2012 1:37 am

My mistake. But I did purchase it in a collection of other little known noirs for what worked out to be 5 dollars per film. I will get back to you with specifics shortly.

Posted By Arthur : April 24, 2012 1:37 am

My mistake. But I did purchase it in a collection of other little known noirs for what worked out to be 5 dollars per film. I will get back to you with specifics shortly.

Posted By Emgee : April 24, 2012 4:27 am

Both Raw Deal and T-Men were released by Sony on a low budget series of noirs. No restauration but decent quality; recommended.
A little browsing should turn up soem retailers.

To Have And Have Not: great picture but check out The Breaking Point. Same story but much more gripping and grimly realistic. Sorry, Bogey, Garfield won that round.

Posted By Emgee : April 24, 2012 4:27 am

Both Raw Deal and T-Men were released by Sony on a low budget series of noirs. No restauration but decent quality; recommended.
A little browsing should turn up soem retailers.

To Have And Have Not: great picture but check out The Breaking Point. Same story but much more gripping and grimly realistic. Sorry, Bogey, Garfield won that round.

Posted By Susan Doll : April 24, 2012 1:06 pm

jdcinehistory: Thanks for letting me know about Jeffrey Vance. It was hard to catch everything in the pre-movie chat between Mankeiwicz and Vance, so I misheard his name as “Banks.”

Thanks to everyone else for commenting on my post. I hope you all get to see Raw Deal, Counsellor at Law, and Cry Danger, and even Fall Guy at some point.

Posted By Susan Doll : April 24, 2012 1:06 pm

jdcinehistory: Thanks for letting me know about Jeffrey Vance. It was hard to catch everything in the pre-movie chat between Mankeiwicz and Vance, so I misheard his name as “Banks.”

Thanks to everyone else for commenting on my post. I hope you all get to see Raw Deal, Counsellor at Law, and Cry Danger, and even Fall Guy at some point.

Posted By Maryann : April 24, 2012 8:36 pm

Great post about a great time at a wonderful event. Aside from the wonderful films we saw, I was happy to see so many young adults at these classic films. It was very satisfying to know that not all young people are only interested in the latest film about comic book heroes or blood sucking vampires.

Posted By Maryann : April 24, 2012 8:36 pm

Great post about a great time at a wonderful event. Aside from the wonderful films we saw, I was happy to see so many young adults at these classic films. It was very satisfying to know that not all young people are only interested in the latest film about comic book heroes or blood sucking vampires.

Posted By Arthur : April 25, 2012 9:32 am

I will check out Breaking Point. By the way, Breaking Point, starring John Garfield, To Have and Have Not, starring Bogart, and the Gun Runners, starring Audie Murphy are all based on the same story, To Have And Have Not, by Ernest Hemingway.

Posted By Arthur : April 25, 2012 9:32 am

I will check out Breaking Point. By the way, Breaking Point, starring John Garfield, To Have and Have Not, starring Bogart, and the Gun Runners, starring Audie Murphy are all based on the same story, To Have And Have Not, by Ernest Hemingway.

Posted By Brian : April 26, 2012 5:00 pm

Thank you for sharing your experiences from the festival, especially your thoughts on Thelma Schoonmaker’s Q&A. Good editors are fascinating, but their work is so often overlooked.

Posted By Brian : April 26, 2012 5:00 pm

Thank you for sharing your experiences from the festival, especially your thoughts on Thelma Schoonmaker’s Q&A. Good editors are fascinating, but their work is so often overlooked.

Posted By Joel : April 26, 2012 9:08 pm

Nice recap Suzi. “Black Narcissus” on the big screen had to be a treat.

Posted By Joel : April 26, 2012 9:08 pm

Nice recap Suzi. “Black Narcissus” on the big screen had to be a treat.

Posted By dukeroberts : April 27, 2012 12:39 am

I would have loved to see Black Narcissus on the big screen. It had to be amazing.

Posted By dukeroberts : April 27, 2012 12:39 am

I would have loved to see Black Narcissus on the big screen. It had to be amazing.

Posted By Pamela Porter : April 27, 2012 1:03 pm

I don’t know if I could have handled seeing David Farrar in all his shorts-clad glory on a big screen.

But I’d have been willing to try – you know…taking one for the home team ;)

Posted By Pamela Porter : April 27, 2012 1:03 pm

I don’t know if I could have handled seeing David Farrar in all his shorts-clad glory on a big screen.

But I’d have been willing to try – you know…taking one for the home team ;)

Posted By Susan Doll : April 27, 2012 2:02 pm

Pamela: I have to say that David Farrar’s short shorts were a bit bizarre, especially when he races to the convent in that one scene. All he had on were the shorts, and it drove poor Sister Ruth over the edge!

Posted By Susan Doll : April 27, 2012 2:02 pm

Pamela: I have to say that David Farrar’s short shorts were a bit bizarre, especially when he races to the convent in that one scene. All he had on were the shorts, and it drove poor Sister Ruth over the edge!

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : April 27, 2012 2:38 pm

Both RAW DEAL and T-MENwere released by Sony on a low budget series of noirs.

Be warned, at least in the case of Sony’s RAW DEAL disc, especially if you haven’t seen it – the entire plot is revealed on the box copy!

Posted By Richard Harland Smith : April 27, 2012 2:38 pm

Both RAW DEAL and T-MENwere released by Sony on a low budget series of noirs.

Be warned, at least in the case of Sony’s RAW DEAL disc, especially if you haven’t seen it – the entire plot is revealed on the box copy!

Posted By Digna : July 4, 2012 8:47 am

I just wonder if today, they can also make classical movies. I think its really challenging to create one and it will be a contest for the film festival.

Digna from Baignoire douche 

Posted By Digna : July 4, 2012 8:47 am

I just wonder if today, they can also make classical movies. I think its really challenging to create one and it will be a contest for the film festival.

Digna from Baignoire douche 

Posted By Arthur : July 4, 2012 6:04 pm

Digna, in 1975 Bogdanovich made At Long Last Love a black and white 1930s style musical comedy starring Burt Reynolds and Cybil Shepherd. It was not well received. However, last year they made a black and white silent film that won a lot of Academy awards.

Posted By Arthur : July 4, 2012 6:04 pm

Digna, in 1975 Bogdanovich made At Long Last Love a black and white 1930s style musical comedy starring Burt Reynolds and Cybil Shepherd. It was not well received. However, last year they made a black and white silent film that won a lot of Academy awards.

Posted By robbushblog : July 4, 2012 10:45 pm

And I loved it, Arthur!

Posted By robbushblog : July 4, 2012 10:45 pm

And I loved it, Arthur!

Leave a Reply

Current ye@r *

MovieMorlocks.com is the official blog for TCM. No topic is too obscure or niche to be excluded from our film discussions. And we welcome your comments on our blogs and bloggers.
See more: facebook.com/tcmtv
See more: twitter.com/tcm
3-D  Action Films  Actors  Actors' Endorsements  Actresses  animal stars  Animation  Anime  Anthology Films  Art in Movies  Australian CInema  Autobiography  Avant-Garde  Aviation  Awards  B-movies  Beer in Film  Behind the Scenes  Best of the Year lists  Biography  Biopics  Black Film  Blu-Ray  Books on Film  Boxing films  British Cinema  Canadian Cinema  Character Actors  Chicago Film History  Cinematography  Classic Films  College Life on Film  Comedy  Comic Book Movies  Crime  Czech Film  Dance on Film  Digital Cinema  Directors  Disaster Films  Documentary  Drama  DVD  Early Talkies  Editing  Educational Films  European Influence on American Cinema  Experimental  Exploitation  Fairy Tales on Film  Faith or Christian-based Films  Family Films  Film Composers  Film Criticism  film festivals  Film History in Florida  Film Noir  Film Scholars  Film titles  Filmmaking Techniques  Films About Gambling  Films of the 1960s  Films of the 1980s  Food in Film  Foreign Film  French Film  Gangster films  Genre  Genre spoofs  HD & Blu-Ray  Holiday Movies  Hollywood history  Hollywood lifestyles  Horror  Horror Movies  Icons  independent film  Italian Film  Japanese Film  Korean Film  Literary Adaptations  Martial Arts  Melodramas  Method Acting  Mexican Cinema  Moguls  Monster Movies  Movie Books  Movie Costumes  movie flops  Movie locations  Movie lovers  Movie Reviewers  Movie settings  Movie Stars  Movie titles  Movies about movies  Music in Film  Musicals  Outdoor Cinema  Paranoid Thrillers  Parenting on film  Pirate movies  Polish film industry  political thrillers  Politics in Film  Pornography  Pre-Code  Producers  Race in American Film  Remakes  Revenge  Road Movies  Romance  Romantic Comedies  Satire  Scandals  Science Fiction  Screenwriters  Semi-documentaries  Serials  Short Films  Silent Film  silent films  Social Problem Film  Sports  Sports on Film  Stereotypes  Straight-to-DVD  Studio Politics  Stunts and stuntmen  Suspense thriller  Swashbucklers  TCM Classic Film Festival  TCM Underground  Television  The British in Hollywood  The Germans in Hollywood  The Hungarians in Hollywood  The Irish in Hollywood  Theaters  Thriller  Trains in movies  Underground Cinema  VOD  War film  Westerns  Women in the Film Industry  Women's Weepies