The King of Comedy: Jerry Lewis at 86

On Friday, March 16th, Jerry Lewis will be celebrating his 86th birthday. Jerry’s been on my mind a lot lately so I didn’t want to let the occasion pass without making note of it. I love Jerry Lewis but it’s not always easy being a Jerry Lewis fan.

Jerry’s said and done plenty of things that have made my toes curl and my hair stand on end. I often think of him as that loony uncle I never had who was a lady’s man in his youth and is now feeling the pull of time so he fights off melancholia with sharp barbs and off-color jokes. You enjoy spending time with him and he always makes you laugh but he can wear out his welcome mighty fast once he’s had a few too many drinks and his monumental ego gets out of control. But when you love somebody and think their work is brilliant it’s easy to overlook their flaws and failings. And that’s the way it is between Jerry and me. I love him. Even if I don’t always like what he says and does.

Recently the multi-talented comedian, actor, producer, screenwriter and director was the subject of a documentary aptly titled JERRY LEWIS: METHOD TO THE MADNESS. This sensitive portrait of an artist in his twilight years originally aired on Encore in December 2011 and runs through April 2012. JERRY LEWIS: METHOD TO THE MADNESS was directed by Gregg Barson and it presents its subject in a respectful and often flattering light but the documentary is never patronizing or dull. Its scope is limited and neglects to mention the contributions of some important Lewis collaborators like director Frank Tashlin. But I genuinely admired the way it focused on the comedian’s creative contributions and gave Lewis’ comedic genius historical context outside of his personal conflicts and public controversies.

Director Gregg Barson was granted unprecedented access to his subject, which resulted in some candid interviews with Lewis who reflects on the incredible highs and lows of his lifelong career. Lewis started working at age 5 with his parents who were both vaudeville performers. After dropping out of high-school he perfected his act and by age 19 he was working side-by-side with Dean Martin as part of the Martin & Lewis comedy team. After Martin & Lewis ended their partnership, Jerry started writing, directing, producing and starring in his own movies in the 1960s. The documentary features never-before-seen footage as well as clips from some of Lewis’ best films. There are also insightful and impassioned interviews with his friends, imitators and admirers including Carl Reiner, Carol Burnett, Eddie Murphy, Chevy Chase, Billy Crystal, Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino, Richard Lewis, Deana Martin (Dean Martin’s daughter) and previous TCM Essentials’ co-host Alec Baldwin. JERRY LEWIS: METHOD TO THE MADNESS will be released on DVD eventually but I highly recommend giving it a look while it’s still showing on Encore.

Besides being the subject of a documentary, three Jerry Lewis films and a television production were released on DVD and Blu-ray in February. The first title made available was THE JAZZ SINGER, which originally aired on NBC’s Lincoln-Mercury Startime TV series in 1959. It was released on DVD by the Inception Media Group and it also contains a making-of short detailing the restoration of THE JAZZ SINGER as well as a still gallery. This updated adaptation of the famous Al Jolson film features the comedian in a rare dramatic role. Lewis’ own background in vaudeville undoubtedly drew him to the story and he makes a smart creative choice to substitute Jolson’s blackface makeup for clown makeup. THE JAZZ SINGER is an interesting attempt to modernize the material but it’s hindered by the limitations of television.

The three Lewis comedies that were just released on DVD by Olive Films include two 1958 Frank Tashlin films, THE GEISHA BOY and ROCK-A-BYE BABY, which make better use of Lewis’ broad talents. THE GEISHA BOY is a silly and sentimental comedy starring Lewis as a magician on a USO tour in Asia where he ends-up befriending an orphaned Japanese boy. ROCK-A-BYE BABY is an updated version of the classic Preston Sturges’ comedy, THE MIRACLE OF MORGAN’S CREEK (1944). Both films are well worth seeking out if you appreciate Frank Tashlin’s work with Lewis. And last but certainly not least, the funny and somewhat dated sixties sex farce BOEING BOEING (1965) features Lewis in one of his more subdued roles alongside costars Tony Curtis, Thelma Ritter and Suzanne Leigh. John Rich’s film details the sexual exploits of a manipulative bachelor (Tony Curtis) who’s wooing three naïve airline stewardesses. Lewis steps in to lend his buddy some advice and ends up falling in love with one of Curtis’ conquests (Suzanne Leigh).

Jerry Lewis & Dean Martin in AT WAR WITH THE ARMY (1950)

Tomorrow Jerry Lewis will be the guest of honor at a special birthday bash being held at the Friars Club in New York where he currently reigns as the club’s “Abbot.” There are plans to show the documentary JERRY LEWIS: METHOD TO THE MADNESS followed by a Q&A with Lewis himself. He’ll be supported by friends and fans like comedian Richard Belzer who is co-hosting the event.

If you’d like to celebrate Lewis’ birthday yourself you can tune into TCM where you’ll find a great selection of Jerry Lewis comedies airing all afternoon including AT WAR WITH THE ARMY (1950), HOOK, LINE AND SINKER (1969), DON’T RAISE THE BRIDGE, LOWER THE RIVER (1967), THE BIG MOUTH (1967) and THREE ON A COUCH (1966). HOOK, LINE AND SINKER and THE BIG MOUTH have never been released on DVD and THREE ON A COUCH has gone out of print so you might want to set your Tivo or DVR to record them. You can find the full schedule of Lewis films being shown March 16th posted on TCM’s website.

I also recommend making time to listen to some episodes of the very funny and entertaining Martin and Lewis radio show that are currently available at the Internet Archive. The Martin and Lewis show aired on NBC Radio from 1949 through 1953 and featured guest appearances by many beloved Hollywood actors such as Bob Hope, Lucille Ball, Peter Lorre, John Garfield, Henry Fonda, Burt Lancaster, Jane Russell, Shelley Winters, William Holden, Linda Darnell, Tony Curtis, Marlene Dietrich, Boris Karloff, Joseph Cotten and the Chairmen of the Board himself, Mr. Frank Sinatra. You can stream the episodes for free and they contain comedy sketches as well a musical numbers. These audio time capsules provide listeners with the opportunity to become more familiar with Jerry Lewis’ early work and get a better understanding of why he’s considered one of the reigning kings of comedy.

Recommended Reading:
Recent Interview with Jerry Lewis from GQ’s August 2011 Issue

0 Response The King of Comedy: Jerry Lewis at 86
Posted By quicksand : March 15, 2012 3:21 pm

I’m glad to hear that Jerry’s alive and kickin’:):)!! When all my childhood buddies were watching silly cartoons on TV, I was watching the latest JL movie possibly with Dean Martin as well. I grew up with the laughing these gusy made me do….long live my second fave American comedian….my absolute fave is Bob Hope in the men’s category and Lucille Ball in the female category:):):)

Posted By quicksand : March 15, 2012 3:21 pm

I’m glad to hear that Jerry’s alive and kickin’:):)!! When all my childhood buddies were watching silly cartoons on TV, I was watching the latest JL movie possibly with Dean Martin as well. I grew up with the laughing these gusy made me do….long live my second fave American comedian….my absolute fave is Bob Hope in the men’s category and Lucille Ball in the female category:):):)

Posted By Don Alex : March 15, 2012 3:28 pm

RELEASE “THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED”, JERRY!

Posted By Don Alex : March 15, 2012 3:28 pm

RELEASE “THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED”, JERRY!

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 3:46 pm

Great article…One error in the piece though. The Jazz Singer was never actually a live show. It was filmed over many days and broadcast. It was done just prior to the shooting of the Lewis/Tashlin collaboration, Cinderfella (1960). Also, at the end of this month, The Mondo Film Podcast will be releasing a 5 hour audio series on the films of Jerry Lewis. The audio documentary/retrospective will feature discussion and never before heard content about the production of the films, The Nutty Professor, The Ladies Man, The Errand Boy, The Patsy, Cinderfella, Who’s Minding The Store?, Rock-A-Bye Baby, The Jazz Singer, and The Big Mouth. The series will feature new interviews with many that worked with Lewis like Sylvia Lewis (The Ladies Man, Hook, Line & Sinker), actor/comic/Lewis fan Joe Piscopo, Co-writer of the Lewis Paramount films Bill Richmond, director of The Method To The Madness Of Jerry Lewis, Gregg Barson, actor William A. Wellman Jr. (The Ladies Man, The Big Mouth, The Patsy), actor James Best (3 On The Couch), actress Stella Stevens (The Nutty Professor), and Chris Lewis son of Jerry Lewis. In addition, many authors whom have written about Lewis will be contributing such as Shawn Levy, author of the Lewis bio, The King Of Comedy and James Neibaur, co-author of The Films Of Jerry Lewis. And then there may be a special guest or two as well……

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 3:46 pm

Great article…One error in the piece though. The Jazz Singer was never actually a live show. It was filmed over many days and broadcast. It was done just prior to the shooting of the Lewis/Tashlin collaboration, Cinderfella (1960). Also, at the end of this month, The Mondo Film Podcast will be releasing a 5 hour audio series on the films of Jerry Lewis. The audio documentary/retrospective will feature discussion and never before heard content about the production of the films, The Nutty Professor, The Ladies Man, The Errand Boy, The Patsy, Cinderfella, Who’s Minding The Store?, Rock-A-Bye Baby, The Jazz Singer, and The Big Mouth. The series will feature new interviews with many that worked with Lewis like Sylvia Lewis (The Ladies Man, Hook, Line & Sinker), actor/comic/Lewis fan Joe Piscopo, Co-writer of the Lewis Paramount films Bill Richmond, director of The Method To The Madness Of Jerry Lewis, Gregg Barson, actor William A. Wellman Jr. (The Ladies Man, The Big Mouth, The Patsy), actor James Best (3 On The Couch), actress Stella Stevens (The Nutty Professor), and Chris Lewis son of Jerry Lewis. In addition, many authors whom have written about Lewis will be contributing such as Shawn Levy, author of the Lewis bio, The King Of Comedy and James Neibaur, co-author of The Films Of Jerry Lewis. And then there may be a special guest or two as well……

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 3:55 pm

quicksand – Glad you enjoyed the piece. I highly recommend the Martin & Lewis radio show episodes that I linked to. Bob Hope & Lucille Ball both appeared on the show.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 3:55 pm

quicksand – Glad you enjoyed the piece. I highly recommend the Martin & Lewis radio show episodes that I linked to. Bob Hope & Lucille Ball both appeared on the show.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 3:56 pm

Don – I’d like to see that myself, Don!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 3:56 pm

Don – I’d like to see that myself, Don!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 4:04 pm

Justin – I’ve read various accounts of THE JAZZ SINGER that state it was shot live (or at least parts were) and then they were combined into a full program. But there’s obviously some confusion about this even though it looks like a live TV production so I appreciate your insight. And thanks for the news about the upcoming Mondo podcast. It sounds really interesting and I’ll look forward to it.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 4:04 pm

Justin – I’ve read various accounts of THE JAZZ SINGER that state it was shot live (or at least parts were) and then they were combined into a full program. But there’s obviously some confusion about this even though it looks like a live TV production so I appreciate your insight. And thanks for the news about the upcoming Mondo podcast. It sounds really interesting and I’ll look forward to it.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 4:10 pm

Kimberly – I actually thought it was done live as well,for many years, cause that is what people write when you search out info about the project. But I recently interviewed Chris, Jerry’s son about the project and he confirmed with me the fact that it was not in fact done live (this will be in the upcoming radio/podcast series – then later published in print online). Also, on the mini-documentary on the new DVD Chris also denies that the project was shown live. The romance of the whole thing is stronger if we think it was done live though.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 4:10 pm

Kimberly – I actually thought it was done live as well,for many years, cause that is what people write when you search out info about the project. But I recently interviewed Chris, Jerry’s son about the project and he confirmed with me the fact that it was not in fact done live (this will be in the upcoming radio/podcast series – then later published in print online). Also, on the mini-documentary on the new DVD Chris also denies that the project was shown live. The romance of the whole thing is stronger if we think it was done live though.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 4:20 pm

Also, let me say…that it’s so wonderful that TCM is showing some of these sort of later Lewis films. I’m very much looking forward to getting a high quality version of HOOK, LINE AND SINKER.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 4:20 pm

Also, let me say…that it’s so wonderful that TCM is showing some of these sort of later Lewis films. I’m very much looking forward to getting a high quality version of HOOK, LINE AND SINKER.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 5:23 pm

Justin – It sounds like you got some great first hand observations about THE JAZZ SINGER from Jerry’s son and I’ve updated my post accordingly. I haven’t watched the mini-length making-of doc yet but I have seen THE JAZZ SINGER and it’s easy to see why critics have often assumed that it was shot live.

I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s TCM schedule as well. I hope a lot of people tune in to catch some of the hard-to-see films.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 5:23 pm

Justin – It sounds like you got some great first hand observations about THE JAZZ SINGER from Jerry’s son and I’ve updated my post accordingly. I haven’t watched the mini-length making-of doc yet but I have seen THE JAZZ SINGER and it’s easy to see why critics have often assumed that it was shot live.

I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s TCM schedule as well. I hope a lot of people tune in to catch some of the hard-to-see films.

Posted By Jason Gilmore : March 15, 2012 5:45 pm

Excellent piece Kimberly, as usual, on a man about whom we are all greatly conflicted. I have been fascinated with him since childhood and was excited to see the documentary you spoke of when I stumbled across it a few months ago.

Thanks for mentioning Frank Tashlin! Glad I wasn’t the only one who finished the film wondering why he hadn’t been mentioned. I’m sure their parting was not amicable but his contributions were invaluable. He had a pretty fine career as an animator and director before Jerry and that should always be noted.

But I digress. Am excited that TCM is honoring Mr. Lewis! There are still a lot of his films I have yet to see. But thank you for writing this warm but honest remembrance.

Posted By Jason Gilmore : March 15, 2012 5:45 pm

Excellent piece Kimberly, as usual, on a man about whom we are all greatly conflicted. I have been fascinated with him since childhood and was excited to see the documentary you spoke of when I stumbled across it a few months ago.

Thanks for mentioning Frank Tashlin! Glad I wasn’t the only one who finished the film wondering why he hadn’t been mentioned. I’m sure their parting was not amicable but his contributions were invaluable. He had a pretty fine career as an animator and director before Jerry and that should always be noted.

But I digress. Am excited that TCM is honoring Mr. Lewis! There are still a lot of his films I have yet to see. But thank you for writing this warm but honest remembrance.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 6:50 pm

Kimberly – another thing…just watching out for you.
But you’ve misspelled BOING BOING (1965) it’s BOEING BOEING.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 6:50 pm

Kimberly – another thing…just watching out for you.
But you’ve misspelled BOING BOING (1965) it’s BOEING BOEING.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 6:57 pm

Jason – Thank you! Glad you enjoyed it (typos and all). I was surprised Tashlin was overlooked in the documentary as well but it’s focus was on Jerry so I suppose it’s not that surprising. I’m looking forward to seeing the films being shown on TCM as well. I still need to see THE BIG MOUTH myself but I do like the others being shown.

Justin – Thanks for pointing out my typo. It’s been noted & corrected. Boing Boing (not BOEING BOEING) is one of my regular news sources so I’m not surprised that I made the mistake.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 15, 2012 6:57 pm

Jason – Thank you! Glad you enjoyed it (typos and all). I was surprised Tashlin was overlooked in the documentary as well but it’s focus was on Jerry so I suppose it’s not that surprising. I’m looking forward to seeing the films being shown on TCM as well. I still need to see THE BIG MOUTH myself but I do like the others being shown.

Justin – Thanks for pointing out my typo. It’s been noted & corrected. Boing Boing (not BOEING BOEING) is one of my regular news sources so I’m not surprised that I made the mistake.

Posted By jennifromrollamo : March 15, 2012 8:44 pm

My parents never cared for Lewis’s comedy, so I never really watched any of his movies, but I would watch the Telethon! I am going to tivo the movies and introduce myself to Lewis’s comedy stylings. Thanks for the radio show info-I listen to the radio a lot and I plan on checking out the Lewis-Martin broadcasts-they sound wonderful, and all of those guest stars-wow!

Posted By jennifromrollamo : March 15, 2012 8:44 pm

My parents never cared for Lewis’s comedy, so I never really watched any of his movies, but I would watch the Telethon! I am going to tivo the movies and introduce myself to Lewis’s comedy stylings. Thanks for the radio show info-I listen to the radio a lot and I plan on checking out the Lewis-Martin broadcasts-they sound wonderful, and all of those guest stars-wow!

Posted By Medusa Morlock : March 15, 2012 9:36 pm

Of course my favorite Lewis films are his peak output — “The Ladies Man” or “Cinderfella” (for nothing more than his jazzy walk down the giant staircase) or “The Nutty Professor” (can I even count how many times I’ve seen the title on a cable TV guide and been crushed that it’s the Murphy remake and not Jerry’s?) or “Who’s Minding the Store?” or “The Disorderly Orderly” or all the rest. I am an aficionado of many comedians and at his best I think Jerry somehow managed to combine klutz and beefcake — though some would see only the klutz — and be a very appealing presence. I also love him in “The King of Comedy” and “Funny Bones” where his probably real-life sometimes cranky self came out.

Definitely a very happy 86th to him!

Posted By Medusa Morlock : March 15, 2012 9:36 pm

Of course my favorite Lewis films are his peak output — “The Ladies Man” or “Cinderfella” (for nothing more than his jazzy walk down the giant staircase) or “The Nutty Professor” (can I even count how many times I’ve seen the title on a cable TV guide and been crushed that it’s the Murphy remake and not Jerry’s?) or “Who’s Minding the Store?” or “The Disorderly Orderly” or all the rest. I am an aficionado of many comedians and at his best I think Jerry somehow managed to combine klutz and beefcake — though some would see only the klutz — and be a very appealing presence. I also love him in “The King of Comedy” and “Funny Bones” where his probably real-life sometimes cranky self came out.

Definitely a very happy 86th to him!

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 10:28 pm

There really wasn’t any reason to include Frank Tashlin in the documentary. The documentary was about Lewis his achievements, his influence, innovation, and creative process. I mean, it wasn’t like Tashlin truly had anything to do in creating Jerry Lewis the actor, performer, the filmmaker he would become ultimately. Even though they both claimed each other as each others teacher, they were really kindred partners. Prior to Tashlin even coming to work with Lewis, Martin & Lewis had already made 13 films together. Martin & Lewis were the biggest comedy act in the business. And on those early efforts it really didn’t matter who directed them as long as your money making stars were happy. So it wasn’t like, the studio needed Tashlin to make Jerry Lewis a star. Tashlin, by the time he came to work first with Martin & Lewis on Hollywood Or Bust, and Artists and Models had established a wonderful reputation as a director who could turn a picture around fast, and on budget.

Also, it’s important to state that by the time that Lewis and Tashlin came to work together for the first time, Lewis had developed an incredible reputation as being someone that was increasing difficult to work with on-set. Tashlin was the first one to actually stand up to Lewis and shut down his antics. This included kicking Lewis off the set of Hollywood Or Bust for having temper tantrums.

Lewis greatly respected Tashin for doing this, and the two developed a friendship and respect for each other. They shared a common mentality. Tashlin of course cut his teeth directing cartoons, and Lewis grew up as a child performer working the borscht belt, and prior to that Lewis’s dad, Danny was a well respected vaudville performer. So while many assume that Tashlin brought this cartoon insanity to those pictures, so did Lewis. After all this cartoon aesthetic wasn’t invented in the cartoon’s. This type of style/humor really comes directly from the sensibilities of the vaudville era. So while many write, Tashlin trained Lewis, it really wasn’t like that. Yes, he roped Lewis in in the literal sense, but not his artistry. Tashlin didn’t shape or form or inspire Lewis as artistic auteur. Off camera, during set-ups, Lewis was off roaming around the studio, visiting certain divisions asking questions about how this camera worked, or how this special effect was done. The Tashlin/Lewis relationship wasn’t a producer recording artist relationship. Yes, Tashlin earned the respect of Lewis, and that stopped him from misbehaving on the set. But they were partners. If you look at the non Jerry Lewis films of Frank Tashlin (The Girl Can’t Help It, Son Of Paleface, The Glass Bottom Boat, The Lt. Wore Skirts) they have a very much more subtle feel to them, they aren’t so fast moving, as cartoonish, there’s a lack of emotion and sincerity, and there is an attention to the satire that Tashlin was so clever at creating in his films.

The films that Lewis and Tashlin made together are just as much Lewis’s as they are Tashlin’s. There is this deep and sincere pathos in the Tashlin/Lewis films, and that’s all Lewis. And that theme runs throughout all of JL’s mid ’60s films. Tashlin/Lewis wrote those film’s together, they created those special moments together, they often argued with love over the direction of them together. There were debates on what to include and not to include, should a song number be left out of something like CInderfella or should it be left in. There was a trust between them. They worked so closely together, it wasn’t a teacher student relationship. It was a partnership.

In fact it was on Tashlin’s advice that Lewis start directing himself. After the filming of Cinderfella in 1960, Paramount attempted to release the film in the summer. Lewis fought against it, and was hoping for a Christmas release that year. Lewis had already spent money marketing the film. He recorded a special sing-a-long type soundtrack and also had the movie poster for the film commissioned by Norman Rockwell. Paramount agreed to push the film back to Christmas on the agreement that Lewis would give them another JL film for the summer. Lewis wrote The Bellboy. He approached Billy Wilder to direct the film, as they were friends, and Wilder had originally asked Lewis to play one of the lead roles in Some Like It Hot. Wilder declined, and it was Tashlin that told Lewis to direct it himself. So the relationship between them was never soured. They remained great friends until Tashlin’s passing in the mid ’70s.

In talking with Gregg, the director of the documentary, he told me that originally the documentary was sold to Starz on the agreement that it was to be a 60min show, but it was on the persistence of Gregg, and showing Starz the line-up he had assembled that Starz agreed to allow him the extra 60mins. So while some may dislike the lack of Tashlin presence, there are others (closer to the work) that are very unhappy that Lewis’s friend/co-writer of films with him like The Nutty Professor, The Errand Boy, The Big Mouth, The Ladies Man, The Family Jewels, Cracking Up, and The Patsy was also omitted. And then Lewis’s first manager from 1945 was angry he wasn’t in it. Then the Lewis family cook was upset that she wasn’t in it. For those interested, here’s a link to a wonderful 90min documentary about Lewis called The Last American Clown. It was either an episode of A&E Biography or it was shown as a stand alone show on A&E, either way it’s pretty great, as everything with JL is…..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OSZpxoG7RA

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 10:28 pm

There really wasn’t any reason to include Frank Tashlin in the documentary. The documentary was about Lewis his achievements, his influence, innovation, and creative process. I mean, it wasn’t like Tashlin truly had anything to do in creating Jerry Lewis the actor, performer, the filmmaker he would become ultimately. Even though they both claimed each other as each others teacher, they were really kindred partners. Prior to Tashlin even coming to work with Lewis, Martin & Lewis had already made 13 films together. Martin & Lewis were the biggest comedy act in the business. And on those early efforts it really didn’t matter who directed them as long as your money making stars were happy. So it wasn’t like, the studio needed Tashlin to make Jerry Lewis a star. Tashlin, by the time he came to work first with Martin & Lewis on Hollywood Or Bust, and Artists and Models had established a wonderful reputation as a director who could turn a picture around fast, and on budget.

Also, it’s important to state that by the time that Lewis and Tashlin came to work together for the first time, Lewis had developed an incredible reputation as being someone that was increasing difficult to work with on-set. Tashlin was the first one to actually stand up to Lewis and shut down his antics. This included kicking Lewis off the set of Hollywood Or Bust for having temper tantrums.

Lewis greatly respected Tashin for doing this, and the two developed a friendship and respect for each other. They shared a common mentality. Tashlin of course cut his teeth directing cartoons, and Lewis grew up as a child performer working the borscht belt, and prior to that Lewis’s dad, Danny was a well respected vaudville performer. So while many assume that Tashlin brought this cartoon insanity to those pictures, so did Lewis. After all this cartoon aesthetic wasn’t invented in the cartoon’s. This type of style/humor really comes directly from the sensibilities of the vaudville era. So while many write, Tashlin trained Lewis, it really wasn’t like that. Yes, he roped Lewis in in the literal sense, but not his artistry. Tashlin didn’t shape or form or inspire Lewis as artistic auteur. Off camera, during set-ups, Lewis was off roaming around the studio, visiting certain divisions asking questions about how this camera worked, or how this special effect was done. The Tashlin/Lewis relationship wasn’t a producer recording artist relationship. Yes, Tashlin earned the respect of Lewis, and that stopped him from misbehaving on the set. But they were partners. If you look at the non Jerry Lewis films of Frank Tashlin (The Girl Can’t Help It, Son Of Paleface, The Glass Bottom Boat, The Lt. Wore Skirts) they have a very much more subtle feel to them, they aren’t so fast moving, as cartoonish, there’s a lack of emotion and sincerity, and there is an attention to the satire that Tashlin was so clever at creating in his films.

The films that Lewis and Tashlin made together are just as much Lewis’s as they are Tashlin’s. There is this deep and sincere pathos in the Tashlin/Lewis films, and that’s all Lewis. And that theme runs throughout all of JL’s mid ’60s films. Tashlin/Lewis wrote those film’s together, they created those special moments together, they often argued with love over the direction of them together. There were debates on what to include and not to include, should a song number be left out of something like CInderfella or should it be left in. There was a trust between them. They worked so closely together, it wasn’t a teacher student relationship. It was a partnership.

In fact it was on Tashlin’s advice that Lewis start directing himself. After the filming of Cinderfella in 1960, Paramount attempted to release the film in the summer. Lewis fought against it, and was hoping for a Christmas release that year. Lewis had already spent money marketing the film. He recorded a special sing-a-long type soundtrack and also had the movie poster for the film commissioned by Norman Rockwell. Paramount agreed to push the film back to Christmas on the agreement that Lewis would give them another JL film for the summer. Lewis wrote The Bellboy. He approached Billy Wilder to direct the film, as they were friends, and Wilder had originally asked Lewis to play one of the lead roles in Some Like It Hot. Wilder declined, and it was Tashlin that told Lewis to direct it himself. So the relationship between them was never soured. They remained great friends until Tashlin’s passing in the mid ’70s.

In talking with Gregg, the director of the documentary, he told me that originally the documentary was sold to Starz on the agreement that it was to be a 60min show, but it was on the persistence of Gregg, and showing Starz the line-up he had assembled that Starz agreed to allow him the extra 60mins. So while some may dislike the lack of Tashlin presence, there are others (closer to the work) that are very unhappy that Lewis’s friend/co-writer of films with him like The Nutty Professor, The Errand Boy, The Big Mouth, The Ladies Man, The Family Jewels, Cracking Up, and The Patsy was also omitted. And then Lewis’s first manager from 1945 was angry he wasn’t in it. Then the Lewis family cook was upset that she wasn’t in it. For those interested, here’s a link to a wonderful 90min documentary about Lewis called The Last American Clown. It was either an episode of A&E Biography or it was shown as a stand alone show on A&E, either way it’s pretty great, as everything with JL is…..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OSZpxoG7RA

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 10:37 pm

Also I forget to agree with Kimberly and say that Yes Yes Yes, do check out the NBC Martin & Lewis Chesterfield radio shows, they are incredible, and these next to the mid ’50s Groucho Marx You Bet Your Life Plymouth radio shows are all one needs for classic comedy radio programs. I believe also on Archive.org there are a few of the early/mid ’50s Martin & Lewis Colgate Comedy Hour television shows as well. And those are essential to check out.

Posted By Justin : March 15, 2012 10:37 pm

Also I forget to agree with Kimberly and say that Yes Yes Yes, do check out the NBC Martin & Lewis Chesterfield radio shows, they are incredible, and these next to the mid ’50s Groucho Marx You Bet Your Life Plymouth radio shows are all one needs for classic comedy radio programs. I believe also on Archive.org there are a few of the early/mid ’50s Martin & Lewis Colgate Comedy Hour television shows as well. And those are essential to check out.

Posted By quicksand : March 16, 2012 10:02 am

Posted By Don Alex : March 15, 2012 3:28 pm
RELEASE “THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED”, JERRY!

What’s that Don?????!

Posted By quicksand : March 16, 2012 10:02 am

Posted By Don Alex : March 15, 2012 3:28 pm
RELEASE “THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED”, JERRY!

What’s that Don?????!

Posted By Volker Stieber : March 16, 2012 10:54 am

>>Posted By Don Alex : March 15, 2012 3:28 pm
>>RELEASE “THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED”, JERRY!

I second that !!!! I’d like to see it released while Mr. Lewis is still alive, with extensive contextual material from him.

I would guess the odds are even less than ever seeing Welles’ OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND footage…

Posted By Volker Stieber : March 16, 2012 10:54 am

>>Posted By Don Alex : March 15, 2012 3:28 pm
>>RELEASE “THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED”, JERRY!

I second that !!!! I’d like to see it released while Mr. Lewis is still alive, with extensive contextual material from him.

I would guess the odds are even less than ever seeing Welles’ OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND footage…

Posted By Jim Vecchio : March 16, 2012 11:50 am

Thanks for this excellent piece. I always think of Jerry as an overinflated egomaniac but I still love and laugh at much of his work. We all have our favorite memories from his films. And Jerry is a living bridge that begins its journey from the tail end of Vaudeville and pioneers a path to innovative cinematic technique.

Posted By Jim Vecchio : March 16, 2012 11:50 am

Thanks for this excellent piece. I always think of Jerry as an overinflated egomaniac but I still love and laugh at much of his work. We all have our favorite memories from his films. And Jerry is a living bridge that begins its journey from the tail end of Vaudeville and pioneers a path to innovative cinematic technique.

Posted By dukeroberts : March 16, 2012 7:27 pm

So Justin, I take it you’re a fan?

Posted By dukeroberts : March 16, 2012 7:27 pm

So Justin, I take it you’re a fan?

Posted By dukeroberts : March 16, 2012 7:28 pm

Unfortunately, I do not have Encore. If I did I would watch the heck out of that documentary.

Posted By dukeroberts : March 16, 2012 7:28 pm

Unfortunately, I do not have Encore. If I did I would watch the heck out of that documentary.

Posted By Justin : March 16, 2012 7:42 pm

Duke Roberts – The documentary is coming to DVD tentatively in June/July 2012. And yes, I’m a admirer of Lewis.

Posted By Justin : March 16, 2012 7:42 pm

Duke Roberts – The documentary is coming to DVD tentatively in June/July 2012. And yes, I’m a admirer of Lewis.

Posted By dukeroberts : March 16, 2012 7:47 pm

Justin- I will keep my eyes peeled for it. And it’s great to see such enthusiasm for a subject as you have for Jerry.

Posted By dukeroberts : March 16, 2012 7:47 pm

Justin- I will keep my eyes peeled for it. And it’s great to see such enthusiasm for a subject as you have for Jerry.

Posted By Susan Doll : March 17, 2012 1:10 am

METHOD TO YOUR MADNESS was enjoyable, especially the footage of Martin and Lewis when they were nightclub stars. Terrific live performers.

I have a big soft spot for Jerry Lewis. My first blog article as a Morlock was about THE BELLBOY; the fist film I saw in the theater was VISIT TO A SMALL PLANET.

Posted By Susan Doll : March 17, 2012 1:10 am

METHOD TO YOUR MADNESS was enjoyable, especially the footage of Martin and Lewis when they were nightclub stars. Terrific live performers.

I have a big soft spot for Jerry Lewis. My first blog article as a Morlock was about THE BELLBOY; the fist film I saw in the theater was VISIT TO A SMALL PLANET.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 17, 2012 1:58 pm

Thanks for the comments, folks! I’m glad Jerry still has lots of fans who appreciate his work

METHOD TO YOUR MADNESS is a terrific insightful look at the comedian and I hope more people will give it a look when it becomes available on DVD later this year. Thanks for sharing info about the release date with us, Justin.

I also wanted to share a link to a new Cinema Retro article that was published today. It’s a report from Jerry’s 86th birthday celebration that took place in NY last night. I thought some of you would enjoy reading it as much as I did: http://www.cinemaretro.com/index.php?/archives/6613-CINEMA-RETRO-COVERS-JERRY-LEWIS-TRIBUTE-AT-NEW-YORKS-92ND-STREET-Y.html

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 17, 2012 1:58 pm

Thanks for the comments, folks! I’m glad Jerry still has lots of fans who appreciate his work

METHOD TO YOUR MADNESS is a terrific insightful look at the comedian and I hope more people will give it a look when it becomes available on DVD later this year. Thanks for sharing info about the release date with us, Justin.

I also wanted to share a link to a new Cinema Retro article that was published today. It’s a report from Jerry’s 86th birthday celebration that took place in NY last night. I thought some of you would enjoy reading it as much as I did: http://www.cinemaretro.com/index.php?/archives/6613-CINEMA-RETRO-COVERS-JERRY-LEWIS-TRIBUTE-AT-NEW-YORKS-92ND-STREET-Y.html

Posted By swac44 : March 20, 2012 8:29 am

Funny, I was at Cinefest in Syracuse on Friday, admiring a collection of original foreign movie posters for Lewis films that I would have loved to buy, but they were a bit out of my budget, and I had no idea it was his birthday. If I’d known, I might have dipped into my savings a bit, it could have been a good omen (there was a French poster for It’s Only Money, retitled “Jerry Lewis, Detective” that was mighty tempting).

I had no fondness for Lewis growing up, but I think that changed once I saw more of the Martin & Lewis films, and more of the Tashlin-directed solo outings (for some reason it was always lesser later films like Which Way to the Front and Don’t Raise the Bridge, Lower the River that seemed to be playing on TV, and the lousy reviews for the contemporary picture Hardly Working didn’t help either). Then I saw some of Martin & Lewis’s old TV shows, where Jerry become unhinged and adlib like crazy (or at least it seemed like he was going off script) and it all really gelled for me. Love those Colgate shows and the radio shows, you understand a lot better why people (especially kids) loved the Martin & Lewis brand of comedic anarchy.

Posted By swac44 : March 20, 2012 8:29 am

Funny, I was at Cinefest in Syracuse on Friday, admiring a collection of original foreign movie posters for Lewis films that I would have loved to buy, but they were a bit out of my budget, and I had no idea it was his birthday. If I’d known, I might have dipped into my savings a bit, it could have been a good omen (there was a French poster for It’s Only Money, retitled “Jerry Lewis, Detective” that was mighty tempting).

I had no fondness for Lewis growing up, but I think that changed once I saw more of the Martin & Lewis films, and more of the Tashlin-directed solo outings (for some reason it was always lesser later films like Which Way to the Front and Don’t Raise the Bridge, Lower the River that seemed to be playing on TV, and the lousy reviews for the contemporary picture Hardly Working didn’t help either). Then I saw some of Martin & Lewis’s old TV shows, where Jerry become unhinged and adlib like crazy (or at least it seemed like he was going off script) and it all really gelled for me. Love those Colgate shows and the radio shows, you understand a lot better why people (especially kids) loved the Martin & Lewis brand of comedic anarchy.

Posted By Mary Ranaudo – Somers : March 21, 2012 6:07 am

Love your article…however, I am certain Joseph COTTEN would be rolling in his grave reading this piece with his name spelled as if he were the fabric indicated and not the correct spelling…

Posted By Mary Ranaudo – Somers : March 21, 2012 6:07 am

Love your article…however, I am certain Joseph COTTEN would be rolling in his grave reading this piece with his name spelled as if he were the fabric indicated and not the correct spelling…

Posted By Justin : March 21, 2012 9:23 am

Mary Ranaudo – Joe wouldn’t roll over, he’s just sit up, grab your hand and slap it, smile, then lay back down. He’s very aristocratic.

Posted By Justin : March 21, 2012 9:23 am

Mary Ranaudo – Joe wouldn’t roll over, he’s just sit up, grab your hand and slap it, smile, then lay back down. He’s very aristocratic.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 21, 2012 2:00 pm

I don’t think a simple typo would make anyone ‘roll over in his grave’ but I appreciate the correction Mary. Your melodramatic delivery made me laugh.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : March 21, 2012 2:00 pm

I don’t think a simple typo would make anyone ‘roll over in his grave’ but I appreciate the correction Mary. Your melodramatic delivery made me laugh.

Posted By dukeroberts : March 22, 2012 1:36 am

Joe might try to throw you off of a moving train. And that’s if he likes you. If you’re a rich widow, forget about it. You’re done.

Kimberly- Was Jerry’s character in The King of Comedy a lot like his real life self? Is that question posed in the documentary?

Posted By dukeroberts : March 22, 2012 1:36 am

Joe might try to throw you off of a moving train. And that’s if he likes you. If you’re a rich widow, forget about it. You’re done.

Kimberly- Was Jerry’s character in The King of Comedy a lot like his real life self? Is that question posed in the documentary?

Posted By Mary : March 24, 2012 9:57 pm

Enjoyed reading this article and the comments following it. I was at the Evening w/ JL at the 92 Y and the after-party at the Friar’s Club on Jerry’s 86th–fantastic! I have some pictures over on my Facebook page if anyone wants to check them out… https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1016847155
@Justin–you seem to share the passion I share–we must talk!
I caught “Method to the Madness of Jerry Lewis”, when it premiered (December 17, 2011)– totally by accident. I loved it! Having grown up in the late 60′s-70′s, I always loved JL in his movies and caught the MDA Telethon every year. More importantly now, gazing upon Jerry with my 40-something eyes and sensibilities I am pleased to realize how smoking hot, handsome, sexy and then some he was! Now I am enjoying all of his old films for more than just laughs!!! LOL. Long live Mr. Lewis–we will never have the good fortune to experience another like him.

Posted By Mary : March 24, 2012 9:57 pm

Enjoyed reading this article and the comments following it. I was at the Evening w/ JL at the 92 Y and the after-party at the Friar’s Club on Jerry’s 86th–fantastic! I have some pictures over on my Facebook page if anyone wants to check them out… https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1016847155
@Justin–you seem to share the passion I share–we must talk!
I caught “Method to the Madness of Jerry Lewis”, when it premiered (December 17, 2011)– totally by accident. I loved it! Having grown up in the late 60′s-70′s, I always loved JL in his movies and caught the MDA Telethon every year. More importantly now, gazing upon Jerry with my 40-something eyes and sensibilities I am pleased to realize how smoking hot, handsome, sexy and then some he was! Now I am enjoying all of his old films for more than just laughs!!! LOL. Long live Mr. Lewis–we will never have the good fortune to experience another like him.

Posted By michelle : April 26, 2012 3:08 pm

There is good reason why the Day the crown cried will never be released. 1) the writer pulled the rights to the screen play shortly after the producer pulled out and in an attempt to get the rights Jerry previewed the dailies and the writer thought it was a disaster 2) Jerry was stoned to the gills on Percodan for a spinal injury during the entire filming and probably wasn’t even aware how bad the production was

Posted By michelle : April 26, 2012 3:08 pm

There is good reason why the Day the crown cried will never be released. 1) the writer pulled the rights to the screen play shortly after the producer pulled out and in an attempt to get the rights Jerry previewed the dailies and the writer thought it was a disaster 2) Jerry was stoned to the gills on Percodan for a spinal injury during the entire filming and probably wasn’t even aware how bad the production was

Posted By Justin : April 26, 2012 4:40 pm

@Michelle…That’s pretty close, but not completely correct. Actually what happened was that during pre-production the producer of The Day The Clown Cried, Nathan Waschberger let the rights to the story expire. He had owned the rights since the mid/late ’60s. In fact the script for Clown was a hot commodity back in the mid ’60s in Hollywood. Milton Berle and Dick Van Dyke were approached to star in the film. Also, Lewis had been approached with the screenplay originally back in ’66 but declined it. He was fearful that he was too young for the part. Remember, he had experienced a damaging blow to his ego back in 1959 when the critics destroyed his performance in The Jazz Singer for NBC. So as the money for Clown Cried starting to dry up, Waschberger started to pull out. He did try to regain the rights. In fact, to obtain the rights would have cost him 50K, and he paid the writers 5K of that money as a good faith gesture, but couldn’t come up with the rest. There are Lewis insiders who insist that Lewis had no clue what was going on with the rights, and then there are others that say he completely knew what was going on. I tend to think that he didn’t. Because when Waschberger pulled out, Lewis started sinking his own money into the production, so it makes sense that if he had knew about the rights issues, he would’ve pulled out as well, or why not just use your money for that as well? I mean, it wasn’t like JL was broke at the time, he was coming out of the ’60s, and he had tons of dough he was the top money-maker for Paramount Studios. The whole legal issue after the production was really a result of Lewis putting together a rough cut, and then showing it to the film’s writers Joan O’Brien and Charles Denton. They were upset cause Lewis had changed the writer’s vision of the character. Once they saw a few scenes in the rough cut they decided to hold the rights. It really makes no sense. They were still getting full screen credit. The paradox of the whole thing really is that Lewis had decided to change the character from this sort of mediocre and evil bastard of a clown to this character that was very Emmett Kelly or Charlie Chaplin, filled to the brim with pathos. What’s interesting about that really is that by the time Lewis got to The Big Mouth in 1967, he was TIRED of playing that type of character. I mean he was known for playing “The Kid”, the simp with heart, that couldn’t help but wear his heart on his sleeve. You see him tiring of that character in The Patsy (1964). And he’s completely devoid of him by the time he gets to The Big Mouth, Three On The Couch, Hook, Line and Sinker, and especially in Which Way To The Front (1970). So for him to go back and try to play that character again is frankly, astounding to me, and it seems like he was a little self doubting in his acting abilities by the time. I don’t know. It’s interesting.

Posted By Justin : April 26, 2012 4:40 pm

@Michelle…That’s pretty close, but not completely correct. Actually what happened was that during pre-production the producer of The Day The Clown Cried, Nathan Waschberger let the rights to the story expire. He had owned the rights since the mid/late ’60s. In fact the script for Clown was a hot commodity back in the mid ’60s in Hollywood. Milton Berle and Dick Van Dyke were approached to star in the film. Also, Lewis had been approached with the screenplay originally back in ’66 but declined it. He was fearful that he was too young for the part. Remember, he had experienced a damaging blow to his ego back in 1959 when the critics destroyed his performance in The Jazz Singer for NBC. So as the money for Clown Cried starting to dry up, Waschberger started to pull out. He did try to regain the rights. In fact, to obtain the rights would have cost him 50K, and he paid the writers 5K of that money as a good faith gesture, but couldn’t come up with the rest. There are Lewis insiders who insist that Lewis had no clue what was going on with the rights, and then there are others that say he completely knew what was going on. I tend to think that he didn’t. Because when Waschberger pulled out, Lewis started sinking his own money into the production, so it makes sense that if he had knew about the rights issues, he would’ve pulled out as well, or why not just use your money for that as well? I mean, it wasn’t like JL was broke at the time, he was coming out of the ’60s, and he had tons of dough he was the top money-maker for Paramount Studios. The whole legal issue after the production was really a result of Lewis putting together a rough cut, and then showing it to the film’s writers Joan O’Brien and Charles Denton. They were upset cause Lewis had changed the writer’s vision of the character. Once they saw a few scenes in the rough cut they decided to hold the rights. It really makes no sense. They were still getting full screen credit. The paradox of the whole thing really is that Lewis had decided to change the character from this sort of mediocre and evil bastard of a clown to this character that was very Emmett Kelly or Charlie Chaplin, filled to the brim with pathos. What’s interesting about that really is that by the time Lewis got to The Big Mouth in 1967, he was TIRED of playing that type of character. I mean he was known for playing “The Kid”, the simp with heart, that couldn’t help but wear his heart on his sleeve. You see him tiring of that character in The Patsy (1964). And he’s completely devoid of him by the time he gets to The Big Mouth, Three On The Couch, Hook, Line and Sinker, and especially in Which Way To The Front (1970). So for him to go back and try to play that character again is frankly, astounding to me, and it seems like he was a little self doubting in his acting abilities by the time. I don’t know. It’s interesting.

Posted By Justin : May 16, 2012 12:18 pm

Hey guys..my audio documentary series on the films of Jerry Lewis became available today. It’s called The Genius Of Jerry Lewis. Part One which is currently available takes a look at The Nutty Professor (1963) and the Tashlin/Lewis collaboration Who’s Minding The Store? (1963). Part One features new interviews with Nutty Professor co-screenwriter Bill Richmond, Lewis biographer, Shawn Levy, authors Ethan De Seife and James L. Neibaur, and actors Eddie Deezen, Stella Stevens and Joe Piscopo. The show also features rare archival audio from Lewis himself talking about the work. Check it out at mondofilmpodcast.blogspot.com

Posted By Justin : May 16, 2012 12:18 pm

Hey guys..my audio documentary series on the films of Jerry Lewis became available today. It’s called The Genius Of Jerry Lewis. Part One which is currently available takes a look at The Nutty Professor (1963) and the Tashlin/Lewis collaboration Who’s Minding The Store? (1963). Part One features new interviews with Nutty Professor co-screenwriter Bill Richmond, Lewis biographer, Shawn Levy, authors Ethan De Seife and James L. Neibaur, and actors Eddie Deezen, Stella Stevens and Joe Piscopo. The show also features rare archival audio from Lewis himself talking about the work. Check it out at mondofilmpodcast.blogspot.com

Posted By Ceri : July 2, 2012 1:34 am

This is a really great article. Jerry’s my all-time favourite comedian and I completely understand what you mean when you say sometimes it’s hard to be a fan because he can say and do some crazy things. In spite of this, I surprise myself that I’m able to overlook all those flaws because I truly believe he’s a wonderful comedian and a terrific filmmaker – one of the best – and, even if he shows a huge ego at times, I say let him. He knows he’s good and so what? :)

Posted By Ceri : July 2, 2012 1:34 am

This is a really great article. Jerry’s my all-time favourite comedian and I completely understand what you mean when you say sometimes it’s hard to be a fan because he can say and do some crazy things. In spite of this, I surprise myself that I’m able to overlook all those flaws because I truly believe he’s a wonderful comedian and a terrific filmmaker – one of the best – and, even if he shows a huge ego at times, I say let him. He knows he’s good and so what? :)

Posted By changeling : July 2, 2012 3:51 am

There’s nothing wrong when you go on an ego trip and know that you’re good when INDDED YOU ARE GOOD!!!! What scares me are the so-called “commedians” of today (90% of them, i.e. the crappy comedy side of the likes of Diaz and Lopez, just to name two “starlettes” of today!!!!) who REALLY think they make people laff…they are the ones

Posted By changeling : July 2, 2012 3:51 am

There’s nothing wrong when you go on an ego trip and know that you’re good when INDDED YOU ARE GOOD!!!! What scares me are the so-called “commedians” of today (90% of them, i.e. the crappy comedy side of the likes of Diaz and Lopez, just to name two “starlettes” of today!!!!) who REALLY think they make people laff…they are the ones

Posted By changeling : July 2, 2012 3:52 am

…..WHO “KNOW” THEY ARE GOOD BUT UNDENIABLY ARE NOT!!!!!:):)

Posted By changeling : July 2, 2012 3:52 am

…..WHO “KNOW” THEY ARE GOOD BUT UNDENIABLY ARE NOT!!!!!:):)

Posted By Teresa H. : October 18, 2012 7:08 am

I’m delighted with all this coments on the person and work of JL. I liked his most famous films when i was child, but now that i see it as a woman i’m fascinated. Not only cause he wears tux like nobody does…but because he’s constant. He’s the same as time goes on…hard to find nowadays.
My grandpa used to say he was old, he had lived a war (Spain civil war), lost a kid and worked hard all his life, he didn’t had to please every body. I think that’s the key. There is people who deserves our inconditional love/admiration. Never forguet they’re just human (although they dont look like sometimes ;) )

Posted By Teresa H. : October 18, 2012 7:08 am

I’m delighted with all this coments on the person and work of JL. I liked his most famous films when i was child, but now that i see it as a woman i’m fascinated. Not only cause he wears tux like nobody does…but because he’s constant. He’s the same as time goes on…hard to find nowadays.
My grandpa used to say he was old, he had lived a war (Spain civil war), lost a kid and worked hard all his life, he didn’t had to please every body. I think that’s the key. There is people who deserves our inconditional love/admiration. Never forguet they’re just human (although they dont look like sometimes ;) )

Posted By albertintucson : October 18, 2012 2:19 pm

Was never a HUGE fan but did go see and enjoy lots of his films as child.

My Favorite: ROCKABYE BABY.

Posted By albertintucson : October 18, 2012 2:19 pm

Was never a HUGE fan but did go see and enjoy lots of his films as child.

My Favorite: ROCKABYE BABY.

Posted By albertintucson : October 18, 2012 2:21 pm

Never a huge fan but did, as a kid, spend many saturdays at the movies with Mr. Lewis. CINDERFELLA, VISIT TO A SMALL PLANET, THE ERRAND BOY, etc.

My favorite Jerry Lewis? ROCKABYE BABY.

Posted By albertintucson : October 18, 2012 2:21 pm

Never a huge fan but did, as a kid, spend many saturdays at the movies with Mr. Lewis. CINDERFELLA, VISIT TO A SMALL PLANET, THE ERRAND BOY, etc.

My favorite Jerry Lewis? ROCKABYE BABY.

Posted By Teresa H. : October 20, 2012 5:09 am

I’ve been watching lots of interviews and i think interviewers become more and more cautelous…maybe it is that they respect him, but i think that in person must be a little intimidating. Cavett and Biggs for instance seem they’re walking on broken glasses.
I wish i could met him inperson. Ask him some questions he hasn’t been asked for (or i haven’t find on net). Of course, had i met him 40th years ago, well …i wasnt born yet!
As you say(the head comentary i mean) at the very begining, such a succes for so many years, maybe still lots of projects, i woud be a little bitter too, watching time run out.
I love Colgate Comedy Hour. So fresh, so candid, both so young and hundsome. Jerry, whatever it hapends is a genius, a good businessman i gues. How is Jerry the person? I wish i had a clue. Maybe you can tell me for you say you met him. i would be really grateful.

Posted By Teresa H. : October 20, 2012 5:09 am

I’ve been watching lots of interviews and i think interviewers become more and more cautelous…maybe it is that they respect him, but i think that in person must be a little intimidating. Cavett and Biggs for instance seem they’re walking on broken glasses.
I wish i could met him inperson. Ask him some questions he hasn’t been asked for (or i haven’t find on net). Of course, had i met him 40th years ago, well …i wasnt born yet!
As you say(the head comentary i mean) at the very begining, such a succes for so many years, maybe still lots of projects, i woud be a little bitter too, watching time run out.
I love Colgate Comedy Hour. So fresh, so candid, both so young and hundsome. Jerry, whatever it hapends is a genius, a good businessman i gues. How is Jerry the person? I wish i had a clue. Maybe you can tell me for you say you met him. i would be really grateful.

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