Do You Want to See Something REALLY Scary?

During the month of October I’m often asked to recommend my favorite horror films. But recommending scary movies can be a tricky business. What frightens me might make you merely shrug your shoulders and laugh out loud. And if you’re a serious horror fan there’s a high probability that you’ve seen a lot of well-regarded classic films such as THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1925), FRANKENSTEIN (1931), PSYCHO (1960) and Val Lewton’s various movies as well as Halloween standards like THE SHINING (1980), CARRIE (1976), NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) and HALLOWEEN (1978) so recommending movies can become rather redundant. Instead of simply suggesting some of my favorite horror films for you to watch I thought I’d share some of my favorite scary moments from films that have left a deep impression on me over the years. So pull up a chair and make yourself comfortable while I share something REALLY scary.


THE INNOCENTS (Jack Clayton; 1961) – The ghostly woman in black

THE INNOCENTS is one of my favorite films and in my not so humble opinion, one of the most frightening films ever made. Henry James’ classic ghost story has been adapted for the screen many times but no film has come close to matching Jack Clayton’s haunting retelling of “The Turn of the Screw.” THE INNOCENTS tells the eerie story of Miss Giddens (Deborah Kerr), a governess to two young children who she believes are haunted by ghosts. The film has a lot of chill-inducing moments but nothing terrifies me more than the startling image of an unearthly woman dressed in black standing by the edge of the water surrounded by tall grass. Kerr only gets a brief glimpse of the ghostly figure of the long dead Miss Jessel (Clytie Jessop) and if you blink you might miss her. But if you do see her, you’ll never forget her.


THE TENANT (Roman Polanski; 1976) – The tooth in the wall

Roman Polanski has made some very frightening films during his controversial career. I’m extremely fond of his horror classic ROSEMARY’S BABY and I appreciate REPULSION as well as his brilliant horror comedy, THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS. I also might be one of the few people who really enjoys THE NINTH GATE but my favorite Polanski film just might be THE TENANT, which also features the director in a starring role. In the film Polanski plays a mild-mannered man who rents an apartment once occupied by a mysterious Egyptologist who’s attempted suicide. Soon after Polanski’s character moves in strange things begin to happen. His neighbors continually harass him and he notices that other tenants are watching him through their apartment windows. Then one evening he spots a small hole in the wall of his apartment and after investigating it he discovers what looks like a human tooth. It’s a strange and compelling moment in a strange and compelling movie. Where did the tooth come from? Why is it there? And why is this moment so damn disturbing?


NIGHT TIDE (Curtis Harrington; 1961) – Where did she go?

NIGHT TIDE stars a very young and fresh-faced Dennis Hopper as a sailor in love with a pretty young woman named Mora (Linda Lawson) who just might be an evil mermaid that lures men to their doom. In one scene Dennis Hopper’s character begins following a mysterious woman in black (Marjorie Cameron) who has frightened Mora and made her believe that she is some kind of sea creature. As Hopper follows the strange woman along the Santa Monica pier the film’s score is lighthearted and almost comical. But when Hopper suddenly turns a corner and loses sight of the woman he’s engulfed in silence and so is the unsuspecting audience. The film quickly veers into what you might call “David Lynch territory” today but Curtis Harrington should be credited with creating his own unsettling screen moments long before Lynch started making movies. As the scene plays out Hopper’s character confronts a young girl carrying a doll who apparently can’t speak English while a rocking chair sways back and forth without any occupant. It’s a surreal moment that seems to foreshadow some unseen horror that we’re never actually sure exists. Although the film’s ending might disappoint some viewers there are plenty of moments like this that make NIGHT TIDE well worth watching.


BURNT OFFERINGS (Dan Curtis; 1976) – The chauffeur

There are a lot of great haunted house films and I happen to think BURNT OFFERINGS is one of them. I particularly like Oliver Reed’s unhinged performance as Ben Rolf, a man tormented by the bad memory of his father’s early death. Having lost my own father at a very young age I can deeply sympathize with Reed’s character who suddenly finds himself face-to-face with the ghostly figure of a sinister chauffeur (Anthony James) who drove him to his father’s funeral many years ago. The chauffeur has apparently returned from the dark corners of Reed’s troubled mind to take his mother (Bette Davis) to her grave. The chauffeur never says a word but he doesn’t need to. His menacing grin is absolutely terrifying and it’s not surprising that it sends Reed’s character completely over the edge.


BURN, WITCH, BURN (Sidney Hayers; 1962) – Where is it?

BURN, WITCH, BURN only has a few “jump out of your seat” moments but it does have plenty of atmosphere and director Sidney Hayers really knows how to invoke tension and dread. One particularly unnerving scene takes place early in the film after Tansy (Janet Blair) has just thrown a small dinner party for her husband’s colleagues. You see, Tansy is a witch but her husband (Peter Wyngarde) doesn’t know it yet and she’s sure that one of her party guests is using black magic to destroy her husband’s career. After the guests leave we watch Tansy dart around the house while her eyes search wildly for any sign of magic and then she spots something. Hanging from a lampshade is a little ornamental figure somewhat primitive in its design. Tansy rips it off the lampshade and immediately burns it. We’re not exactly sure what it is and why she’s so upset by it but we’re completely swept up in her fear and anxiety. You can cut the tension in BURN, WITCH, BURN with a knife… or a scream!


BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW (Piers Haggard; 1970) – The witches are coming

BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW is a frightening film about a rural village in 17th century England besieged by witches. It has plenty of scary moments from beginning to end but there’s one scene that I’ve always found particularly terrifying. It takes place near the end of the film as we watch Ralph (Barry Andrews) hiding in the attic of a country home after he’s just discovered that his leg has been branded with a hairy “witch’s mark.” He knows that the witches will come after him soon and when he peek’s out the tiny attic window he sees the field surrounding his home lit up by torches making their way towards him. The witches are coming and they’re going to get a hold of him soon. There’s absolutely no escape and as the tension begins to build the music reaches a screeching crescendo that literally makes me shake with fear right along with poor Ralph.


DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS (Terence Fisher; 1966) – The tapping on the window

Terence Fisher directed many of Hammer studio’s best films but DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS is often considered one of his lesser efforts. I happen to disagree with that conclusion and I find DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS to be one of the director’s most frightening films. In one particularly disturbing scene Barbara Shelley’s character has been transformed into a vampire after being bitten by Dracula (Christopher Lee) and she returns from the dead to feed on her sister-in-law Diana (Suzan Farmer) who’s resting in bed. While Diana sleeps she begins to hear a faint tapping that grows louder with each passing second and she finally realizes that the sound is coming from her window. Outside we can barely make out the corpse of Barbara Shelley begging to be let in. If you’re familiar with vampire lore you know that you never invite a vampire inside but that doesn’t stop Diana from opening her window and things quickly get ugly from there. DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS may not be the most stylish Hammer vampire film but it has a few things going for it that other Dracula films don’t. Peter Cushing’s heroic Van Helsing character is nowhere to be found so he can’t save the day and Christopher Lee has no speaking lines in the film so he’s reduced to playing a hissing hungry monster. The absence of Cushing and the silence of Lee make DRACULA PRINCE A DARKNESS a surprisingly creepy film and an atypical entry in Hammer’s impressive Dracula cannon.


THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS (Robert Florey; 1946) – The hand plays the piano

Severed hands have been the subject of a few entertaining horror films including THE HAND (Oliver Stone; 1981) and one of my favorite horror anthologies, DR. TERRORS HOUSE OF HORROR (Freddie Francis; 1965) but I think the most effective severed hand film is Robert Florey’s THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS starring the one and only Peter Lorre. In one of the film’s most chilling moments we watch in horror as Lorre’s character discovers that a grisly looking dismembered hand is playing the piano. Like many horror movies from the period, THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS ends on a light note that somewhat shatters the mood set beforehand (bad pun intended!) but it can’t erase the memory of Peter Lorre wrestling with his demons and that oh so creepy hand.

This is just a handful (another bad pun intended!) of scary moments from some of my favorite horror films. Please feel free to share some of your own in the comments section below.

Last but not least, I want to let readers know that DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS and THE INNOCENTS are both scheduled to play on TCM this Halloween on Oct 31st beginning at 10:15 AM ET. It’s a great opportunity to catch up with some genuinely frightening films if you haven’t had the opportunity to see them yet.

49 Responses Do You Want to See Something REALLY Scary?
Posted By Christopher : October 27, 2011 6:58 pm

You’re right about the woman in black by the water in The Innocents..When I struggle to think of the things that truely get under my skin in horror films,this is one of the only few images that come to mind,I’m also a fan of the same scene in the 1999 version of Turn of The Screw..Its everything that creeps me out about Funeral black,death,ghosts and strangers watching you from afar all in one,all in a few moments..

Posted By Christopher : October 27, 2011 6:58 pm

You’re right about the woman in black by the water in The Innocents..When I struggle to think of the things that truely get under my skin in horror films,this is one of the only few images that come to mind,I’m also a fan of the same scene in the 1999 version of Turn of The Screw..Its everything that creeps me out about Funeral black,death,ghosts and strangers watching you from afar all in one,all in a few moments..

Posted By David : October 27, 2011 7:19 pm

Completely agree with you regarding that scene from The Innocents. What emphasises it, for me, is that it occurs in ‘safe’ daylight not, at night.
Likewise, The Tenant and Burn, Witch, Burn (though I know it as Night Of The Eagle). What are your thoughts on The Haunting? (not the remake . .)

Posted By David : October 27, 2011 7:19 pm

Completely agree with you regarding that scene from The Innocents. What emphasises it, for me, is that it occurs in ‘safe’ daylight not, at night.
Likewise, The Tenant and Burn, Witch, Burn (though I know it as Night Of The Eagle). What are your thoughts on The Haunting? (not the remake . .)

Posted By dukeroberts : October 27, 2011 7:34 pm

I made my mom watch The Innocents last weekend. She didn’t appreciate it. She said it was boring and stupid. I told her she was wrong. She is so very wrong. Great atmosphere and sound in that movie. What is it about children singing that is so damn creepy? The still, silent woman in black is creepy, but the sound of children singing is even creepier.

Posted By dukeroberts : October 27, 2011 7:34 pm

I made my mom watch The Innocents last weekend. She didn’t appreciate it. She said it was boring and stupid. I told her she was wrong. She is so very wrong. Great atmosphere and sound in that movie. What is it about children singing that is so damn creepy? The still, silent woman in black is creepy, but the sound of children singing is even creepier.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 27, 2011 8:15 pm

Obviously I agree with you both. I find the film incredibly creepy and deeply unnerving. I can’t imagine anyone finding THE INNOCENTS boring & stupid but different strokes for different folks I suppose.

And you’re right Duke, singing children can also be very creepy in a horror film and Flora’s humming (right before the woman in black appears next to the water) in THE INNOCENTS is really eerie. The film opens with a chilling song as well. Another one of my favorite films with singing children is Dario Argento’s DEEP RED, which has an incredible soundtrack.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 27, 2011 8:15 pm

Obviously I agree with you both. I find the film incredibly creepy and deeply unnerving. I can’t imagine anyone finding THE INNOCENTS boring & stupid but different strokes for different folks I suppose.

And you’re right Duke, singing children can also be very creepy in a horror film and Flora’s humming (right before the woman in black appears next to the water) in THE INNOCENTS is really eerie. The film opens with a chilling song as well. Another one of my favorite films with singing children is Dario Argento’s DEEP RED, which has an incredible soundtrack.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : October 27, 2011 8:58 pm

I agree with all these choices except one – Night Tide, because I haven’t seen it! Now I must! I was saying just the other day in an e-mail with some friends that I’ve got to watch a lot more horror I haven’t seen instead of just the same standards again and again. I’ve got to see Night Tide now, if only to see why the ending might disappoint. I’m really curious about that now.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : October 27, 2011 8:58 pm

I agree with all these choices except one – Night Tide, because I haven’t seen it! Now I must! I was saying just the other day in an e-mail with some friends that I’ve got to watch a lot more horror I haven’t seen instead of just the same standards again and again. I’ve got to see Night Tide now, if only to see why the ending might disappoint. I’m really curious about that now.

Posted By Jenni : October 27, 2011 9:30 pm

The Innocents, one of my favorite scary movies, and yes, the governess’s ghost in the distance is creepy, but the one that makes me jump is the ghost of the man, peering into the house at night, with such a malevolent look on his face, staring right at Deborah Kerr’s character.

A horror movie not mentioned yet on any Halloween blogs for the Morlocks is The Wicker Man, and not the remake with Nicholas Cage, but the original with Edward Woodward and Christopher Lee. I rented this about 4 years ago, and felt so helpless for Woodward’s character as he has discovered the evil on the island that his cop character has come to in order to find a missing teen, realizes he is doomed, and no one will be coming to rescue him, very creepy and sad, too.

Posted By Jenni : October 27, 2011 9:30 pm

The Innocents, one of my favorite scary movies, and yes, the governess’s ghost in the distance is creepy, but the one that makes me jump is the ghost of the man, peering into the house at night, with such a malevolent look on his face, staring right at Deborah Kerr’s character.

A horror movie not mentioned yet on any Halloween blogs for the Morlocks is The Wicker Man, and not the remake with Nicholas Cage, but the original with Edward Woodward and Christopher Lee. I rented this about 4 years ago, and felt so helpless for Woodward’s character as he has discovered the evil on the island that his cop character has come to in order to find a missing teen, realizes he is doomed, and no one will be coming to rescue him, very creepy and sad, too.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 27, 2011 10:14 pm

I’d be curious to know what you thought of the ending of NIGHT TIDE if you get the chance to see it, Greg. I love the film from beginning to end but I’ve read a lot of complaints about the way it unfolds. Anyway you cut it the film has GREAT atmosphere and I love Harrington’s direction. He made a lot of horror movies that I like but NIGHT TIDE’s probably my favorite of Harrington’s films. I think it would make a good double bill with CARNIVAL OF SOULS.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 27, 2011 10:14 pm

I’d be curious to know what you thought of the ending of NIGHT TIDE if you get the chance to see it, Greg. I love the film from beginning to end but I’ve read a lot of complaints about the way it unfolds. Anyway you cut it the film has GREAT atmosphere and I love Harrington’s direction. He made a lot of horror movies that I like but NIGHT TIDE’s probably my favorite of Harrington’s films. I think it would make a good double bill with CARNIVAL OF SOULS.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 27, 2011 10:20 pm

The original WICKER MAN is a great film, Jenni and another one of my favorites so I’m glad you brought it up. I can’t think of one particular moment in the movie that I find especially disturbing right now but the whole film is brilliant and Woodward is terrific in it. After you’ve seen it a few times it does lose a bit of it’s ability to shock and instead, like you, I find it somewhat sad now. There’s a melancholy aspect to the whole thing that is touching as well as chilling. It’s an unusual horror film and a great one to watch on Halloween.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 27, 2011 10:20 pm

The original WICKER MAN is a great film, Jenni and another one of my favorites so I’m glad you brought it up. I can’t think of one particular moment in the movie that I find especially disturbing right now but the whole film is brilliant and Woodward is terrific in it. After you’ve seen it a few times it does lose a bit of it’s ability to shock and instead, like you, I find it somewhat sad now. There’s a melancholy aspect to the whole thing that is touching as well as chilling. It’s an unusual horror film and a great one to watch on Halloween.

Posted By Emgee : October 28, 2011 3:28 pm

That single shot of the former nanny is indeed haunting and unforgettable; i’d almost go as far as to say that it totally sets the mood for the entire movie. I saw this movie as a kid and was seriously spooked, but also hooked on gothic from then on.
Not quite in the same league, but also pretty effective are the noises and sights in The Others; a shame Nicole Kidman plays it a little over the top.

Posted By Emgee : October 28, 2011 3:28 pm

That single shot of the former nanny is indeed haunting and unforgettable; i’d almost go as far as to say that it totally sets the mood for the entire movie. I saw this movie as a kid and was seriously spooked, but also hooked on gothic from then on.
Not quite in the same league, but also pretty effective are the noises and sights in The Others; a shame Nicole Kidman plays it a little over the top.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 28, 2011 3:47 pm

David – Didn’t mean to ignore your comment but it didn’t show up yesterday. Just wanted to add that I love THE HAUNTING! If my list was longer I would have made room to include the scene when Julie Harris & Claire Bloom are in bed and that awful pounding starts. Terrifying! The scene when Harris thinks Bloom’s character is squeezing her hand us also incredibly creepy. Fantastic film!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 28, 2011 3:47 pm

David – Didn’t mean to ignore your comment but it didn’t show up yesterday. Just wanted to add that I love THE HAUNTING! If my list was longer I would have made room to include the scene when Julie Harris & Claire Bloom are in bed and that awful pounding starts. Terrifying! The scene when Harris thinks Bloom’s character is squeezing her hand us also incredibly creepy. Fantastic film!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 28, 2011 3:58 pm

Emgee – I was lucky (or unlucky?) to see THE INNOCENTS when I was very young and it really upset me. And I still find it an incredibly effective and haunting film. I honestly can’t think of a better or more frightening movie about ghosts/haunted houses. I like THE OTHERS too and think it’s one of the better horror films made in the last 10 years but so much of it is familiar. It borrowed heavily from THE INNOCENTS but I never found it as unsettling as Clayton’s film, which really sets a mood and creates an incredibly creepy atmosphere. I also recently wrote about a film here at the Morlocks called VOICES @ http://moviemorlocks.com/2011/10/13/the-voices-of-terror-twisting-two-minds/ which you might be interested in. In fact, I’d go so far as saying that THE OTHERS is just a knock off of THE INNOCENTS & VOICES. It’s a somewhat effective knock-off but I prefer the older original films.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 28, 2011 3:58 pm

Emgee – I was lucky (or unlucky?) to see THE INNOCENTS when I was very young and it really upset me. And I still find it an incredibly effective and haunting film. I honestly can’t think of a better or more frightening movie about ghosts/haunted houses. I like THE OTHERS too and think it’s one of the better horror films made in the last 10 years but so much of it is familiar. It borrowed heavily from THE INNOCENTS but I never found it as unsettling as Clayton’s film, which really sets a mood and creates an incredibly creepy atmosphere. I also recently wrote about a film here at the Morlocks called VOICES @ http://moviemorlocks.com/2011/10/13/the-voices-of-terror-twisting-two-minds/ which you might be interested in. In fact, I’d go so far as saying that THE OTHERS is just a knock off of THE INNOCENTS & VOICES. It’s a somewhat effective knock-off but I prefer the older original films.

Posted By Emgee : October 28, 2011 4:13 pm

Kimberly, thanks a lot for the tip; i’m always grateful for any info on a potentially interesting movie!
Yes, without The Innocents there would definitely be no “The Others”; i’d say it’s derivative, but worthwhile. Unforgettable? Hardly, but i’m grateful for any decent ghost story not dripping with gore.
Having read your blog on Voices; how about the figure in red in Don’t Look Now for something REALLY scary? i saw it even before i’d seen The Innocents and it seriously scared me witless.
BTW: Anybody want to write a blog on children in horror movies?

Posted By Emgee : October 28, 2011 4:13 pm

Kimberly, thanks a lot for the tip; i’m always grateful for any info on a potentially interesting movie!
Yes, without The Innocents there would definitely be no “The Others”; i’d say it’s derivative, but worthwhile. Unforgettable? Hardly, but i’m grateful for any decent ghost story not dripping with gore.
Having read your blog on Voices; how about the figure in red in Don’t Look Now for something REALLY scary? i saw it even before i’d seen The Innocents and it seriously scared me witless.
BTW: Anybody want to write a blog on children in horror movies?

Posted By Christopher : October 28, 2011 9:22 pm

I saw Night Tide for the first time back in high school days on TV late one night randomly changing channels,and even then I felt it was pretty special and sensed its hypnotic, “other worldly”qualities.One of my favorite tidbits in The Haunting(1963)is during the scene where Julie Harris and Claire Bloom are in bed experiencing those noises,and the camera for a few seconds,focuses on the Wall paper and you can vaguely make out what appears to be the face of a spook or demon in the pattern…How many of us have starred at a pattern in the wood paneling or wallpaper design or, as in the case of some of the homes I lived,the cracks in the walls,and seen figures?..

Posted By Christopher : October 28, 2011 9:22 pm

I saw Night Tide for the first time back in high school days on TV late one night randomly changing channels,and even then I felt it was pretty special and sensed its hypnotic, “other worldly”qualities.One of my favorite tidbits in The Haunting(1963)is during the scene where Julie Harris and Claire Bloom are in bed experiencing those noises,and the camera for a few seconds,focuses on the Wall paper and you can vaguely make out what appears to be the face of a spook or demon in the pattern…How many of us have starred at a pattern in the wood paneling or wallpaper design or, as in the case of some of the homes I lived,the cracks in the walls,and seen figures?..

Posted By David : October 28, 2011 10:44 pm

One of the the things I like about The Haunting are the low key flourishes that maintain a constant level of unease. Such as the chilling smile on the face of the housekeeper at the end of the conversation she has with Elenore upon her arrival; the door that shuts by itself – but only when its good and ready; the implied but never stated visual suggestion that the upraised hand of the statue that could be old Hugh Crane in the conservatory was what was responsible for writing Elenore’s name in the corridor in the previous scene – (Chalk? No . . something like chalk)
Clay or plaster perhaps?

Posted By David : October 28, 2011 10:44 pm

One of the the things I like about The Haunting are the low key flourishes that maintain a constant level of unease. Such as the chilling smile on the face of the housekeeper at the end of the conversation she has with Elenore upon her arrival; the door that shuts by itself – but only when its good and ready; the implied but never stated visual suggestion that the upraised hand of the statue that could be old Hugh Crane in the conservatory was what was responsible for writing Elenore’s name in the corridor in the previous scene – (Chalk? No . . something like chalk)
Clay or plaster perhaps?

Posted By eliot fish : October 29, 2011 12:55 pm

of all the horror films i have seen,The Haunting(1963)is the scariest i have seen.Back in 1973,i saw this chiller and i could remember it practically verbatim! the scenes in the bedroom,especially the face(s) on the wall!i could not sleep that night!A movie with darkness,high places,coldness,enclosed places all add up to true terror in films. slick camera work and a truly chilling score and sound recording all make for a frightning movie! 5 ***** ! l

Posted By eliot fish : October 29, 2011 12:55 pm

of all the horror films i have seen,The Haunting(1963)is the scariest i have seen.Back in 1973,i saw this chiller and i could remember it practically verbatim! the scenes in the bedroom,especially the face(s) on the wall!i could not sleep that night!A movie with darkness,high places,coldness,enclosed places all add up to true terror in films. slick camera work and a truly chilling score and sound recording all make for a frightning movie! 5 ***** ! l

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 29, 2011 5:34 pm

Emgee – DON’T LOOK NOW is another terrific film with some really chilling moments. I love the scene where Sutherland sees Christie in a gondola with the two older women when she’s supposed to be back in London. Very eerie! And the figure in red is incredibly creepy. Love that film as well!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 29, 2011 5:34 pm

Emgee – DON’T LOOK NOW is another terrific film with some really chilling moments. I love the scene where Sutherland sees Christie in a gondola with the two older women when she’s supposed to be back in London. Very eerie! And the figure in red is incredibly creepy. Love that film as well!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 29, 2011 5:38 pm

Christopher – “How many of us have starred at a pattern in the wood paneling or wallpaper design or, as in the case of some of the homes I lived,the cracks in the walls,and seen figures?”

Very true! THE HAUNTING has a lot of memorable moments. And I’m glad to find someone else who enjoyed NIGHT TIDE. the film does have a lot of “other worldly” qualities and Curtis Harrington’s a fascinating director.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 29, 2011 5:38 pm

Christopher – “How many of us have starred at a pattern in the wood paneling or wallpaper design or, as in the case of some of the homes I lived,the cracks in the walls,and seen figures?”

Very true! THE HAUNTING has a lot of memorable moments. And I’m glad to find someone else who enjoyed NIGHT TIDE. the film does have a lot of “other worldly” qualities and Curtis Harrington’s a fascinating director.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 29, 2011 5:46 pm

Eliot – You’re not alone, Eliot! THE HAUNTING has rightly left a huge impression on a lot people and I love how everyone keeps mentioning it in the comments. It’s a great film!

Besides THE INNOCENTS and BURNT OFFERINGS, which I mentioned above, some of my other favorite haunted house/ghost films are THE UNINVITED (1944), CASTLE OF BLOOD (1964) and THE LEGEND OF HELL HOUSE (1973). I think they’re all really terrific. If you enjoy THE HAUNTING you might enjoy those as well.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 29, 2011 5:46 pm

Eliot – You’re not alone, Eliot! THE HAUNTING has rightly left a huge impression on a lot people and I love how everyone keeps mentioning it in the comments. It’s a great film!

Besides THE INNOCENTS and BURNT OFFERINGS, which I mentioned above, some of my other favorite haunted house/ghost films are THE UNINVITED (1944), CASTLE OF BLOOD (1964) and THE LEGEND OF HELL HOUSE (1973). I think they’re all really terrific. If you enjoy THE HAUNTING you might enjoy those as well.

Posted By MERYL LOUISE THOMPSON : October 29, 2011 6:33 pm

I LIKE TCM SO MUCH. EVERY FANTHASTIC FILM. THIS IS MY FAVOURITY CHANEL.

Posted By MERYL LOUISE THOMPSON : October 29, 2011 6:33 pm

I LIKE TCM SO MUCH. EVERY FANTHASTIC FILM. THIS IS MY FAVOURITY CHANEL.

Posted By peter HOWELL : October 29, 2011 7:44 pm

The Innocents is such a great film. I thought the aggressive, menacing ghost of Quint was far more unnerving. Miss Jessel, seen at a distance, looked melancholy, almost pathetic.

Posted By peter HOWELL : October 29, 2011 7:44 pm

The Innocents is such a great film. I thought the aggressive, menacing ghost of Quint was far more unnerving. Miss Jessel, seen at a distance, looked melancholy, almost pathetic.

Posted By David : October 30, 2011 3:39 am

Kimberly, what are your thoughts on Michael Winner’s The Nightcomers, supposedly the prequel to The Innocents, and possibly a ‘horror’ movie of a different sort. It seems to have a mixed reputation as well as being something of an oddity. I’m not sure if it was ever really intended to stand next to The Innocents at all. I’ve only ever seen bits and pieces of it and was somewhat curious about it.

Posted By David : October 30, 2011 3:39 am

Kimberly, what are your thoughts on Michael Winner’s The Nightcomers, supposedly the prequel to The Innocents, and possibly a ‘horror’ movie of a different sort. It seems to have a mixed reputation as well as being something of an oddity. I’m not sure if it was ever really intended to stand next to The Innocents at all. I’ve only ever seen bits and pieces of it and was somewhat curious about it.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 31, 2011 2:47 pm

Meryl – Thanks and I’m glad you enjoy TCm so much!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 31, 2011 2:47 pm

Meryl – Thanks and I’m glad you enjoy TCm so much!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 31, 2011 2:51 pm

Peter – Quint’s appearance is really unnerving, which is why I shard a shot of it in the promo picture at the start of my piece but I didn’t find it as disturbing as MIss Jessel’s appearance. When Quint appears it’s at night through a window, which is sort of typical in horror films. Not much of a surprise for me but Miss Jessel appearing in broad daylight is something else entirely. Totally unexpected. Melancholy? Absolutely! But also very, very spooky.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 31, 2011 2:51 pm

Peter – Quint’s appearance is really unnerving, which is why I shard a shot of it in the promo picture at the start of my piece but I didn’t find it as disturbing as MIss Jessel’s appearance. When Quint appears it’s at night through a window, which is sort of typical in horror films. Not much of a surprise for me but Miss Jessel appearing in broad daylight is something else entirely. Totally unexpected. Melancholy? Absolutely! But also very, very spooky.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 31, 2011 2:56 pm

David – I like the Nighcomers mainly because I really like Brando and it has some interesting moments but overall, it doesn’t really work for me. It’s more of a mood piece and a psychological study of Quint & Miss Jessel’s relationship before they die. I appreciate the idea but there’s not must chemistry between Brando and his female lead (Stephanie Beacham), which I thought made the film feel rather flat. It’s worth a look though mainly for Brando’s unusual performance and Winner’s direction.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : October 31, 2011 2:56 pm

David – I like the Nighcomers mainly because I really like Brando and it has some interesting moments but overall, it doesn’t really work for me. It’s more of a mood piece and a psychological study of Quint & Miss Jessel’s relationship before they die. I appreciate the idea but there’s not must chemistry between Brando and his female lead (Stephanie Beacham), which I thought made the film feel rather flat. It’s worth a look though mainly for Brando’s unusual performance and Winner’s direction.

Posted By Wednesday Reads: 10,000 Full Cavitity Searches…on Pigeons? | Sky Dancing : October 1, 2014 11:32 am

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