Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (1973)

WE WANT YOU SALLY….WE WANT YOU….COME TO US!        

For those who first saw DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK at a young impressionable age when it originally aired on ABC in 1973, those maniacal, whispering voices of the little demons have probably stayed with you and so has this creepy little made-for-TV movie that has one of the more memorable endings of any haunted house genre picture.

In the day, the made-for-TV movie was rarely given the same respect or critical attention of a theatrical feature and as they were all solo ventures they never had a chance to build an audience like a recurring TV series. Yet horror fans, in particular, remember some of the terrifically weird and imaginative efforts that emerged from this much maligned category, watching them obsessively in repeats, such as Crawlspace (1972) with Arthur Kennedy and Teresa Wright as an older couple with a strange intruder under their house, Bad Ronald (1974) starring Scott Jacoby as a psychotic teenage voyeur, Trilogy of Terror (1975) featuring Karen Black vs. a ferocious Zuni fetish doll, and another personal favorite, The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975), Paul Wendkos’ tantalizing dramatization of the famous murder case in which the title character (played by Elizabeth Montgomery) was accused of axing her father and stepmother to death in Fall River, Massachusetts in 1892.

I recently revisited DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK on DVD (Warner Archives released it in the fall of 2009) in anticipation of the new remake by producer/writer Guillermo del Toro and first time feature director Troy Nixey. The new version is due for a theatrical release in late August but more about that later. The thing that struck me about the original telefeature the second time around is the modest, no frills nature of the film. Despite countless testimonials and fond memories from fans on the internet touting the movie’s frightening impact, anyone coming to DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK for the first time will probably react with “What? This is supposed to be scary? It this a joke?”

It’s true that the film has little violence or gore or anything comparable to a contemporary horror film. And it has the low-budget look of a made-for-TV movie from the seventies complete with the now dated fashions, bad hair, drab interiors and a dominant earth tone color palette. Everything is merely serviceable from the script to the performances to the cinematography to the special effects, etc. with the exception of the lighting which is intentionally dark and lacking clarity. Yet the movie still casts a spell with its bare bones premise (spoilers ahead).

The setup has a sense of deja vu about it. A young couple, Sally (Kim Darby) and Alex Farnham (Jim Hutton), buy an old, sprawling mansion that we already know is haunted from the opening credits. Without going into a detailed plot description, all you need to know is that Sally, in her determination to make some renovations to the house, unleashes some demonic creatures from the sealed up fireplace in the study…demons that only she can see and hear. While there is something almost comical and endearing about these little imps from hell (they look like shriveled up, moldy variations of the Poppin’ Fresh Pillsbury doughboy or critters carved out of winter squash), the film retains some of its original mystique simply because so little is explained. Who are they and where do they come from? Why do they want Sally?

There is no backstory or mythology on the demons or much detail about Sally’s grandparents who previously lived in the mansion. And what happened to her grandfather? Don’t expect any of these questions to be answered or any of the subsequent ones you’ll have after the film draws to a macabre fadeout amid more ghostly whispering.

What once worked as a spinetingler for pre-teens – and probably still would for impressionable 8 year olds – also works as a Grimm’s Fairy Tale for Adults. On one level, it’s exactly what it appears to be – a haunted house tale but on another level you could view DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK as the diary of a mad housewife. In this case, the mental and emotional breakdown of a woman trying to please her self absorbed, career-focused husband. In their few scenes together, it’s obvious that the relationship between Sally and Alex is strained and in trouble, something she is barely able to even articulate with her friend, Joan (Barbara Anderson). As her self confidence gives way to paranoia, Sally begins to resemble the fragile heroines of The Haunting and Rosemary’s Baby. Her curiosity, however, makes her a modern day Pandora and she pays the price for her stubborn refusal to heed the warnings of her handyman (William Demarest). Just as Hitchcock would taunt us with the cool beauty and perfection of Tippi Hedren in The Birds before destroying her, DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK serves up a dutiful Yuppie wife for the sacrificial altar and some of the once frightening scenes work better now as black humor – the dinner party scene where Sally freaks out at the sight of a gnome under the table or the sequence where Sally witnesses the death of her interior decorator Francisco Perez (Pedro Armendariz Jr.) at the hands of the little monsters.

There was certainly nothing in the resume of screenwriter Nigel McKeand to suggest that he would be best remembered for a made-for-tv horror film. McKeand spent most of his career writing for television with a focus on family series like The Waltons, 7th Heaven and 12 O’Clock High. His only foray into fantasy appears to be one episode for Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. Director John Newland, however, was an early pioneer in creating fantasy genre series for television beginning with One Step Beyond in 1959.  Other career highlights include numerous episodes of Thriller (“Pigeons from Hell”, “Portrait Without a Face”), Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Rod Serling’s Night Gallery, The Sixth Sense, and the TV movie Crawlspace. He made a few feature films between his busy TV schedule such as the crime drama The Violaters (1957) and My Lover My Son (1970). Following DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK, he directed the rarely seen theatrical feature THE LEGEND OF HILLBILLY JOHN (1974), a mystical folk tale with supernatural elements starring Severn Darden and Susan Strasberg.

At the time Jim Hutton and Kim Darby were cast in DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK, both actors were experiencing a downward arc in their careers. Hutton was getting too old for the boyish romantic leads that made him famous (Where the Boys Are, The Horizontal Lieutenant) and after supporting roles in two John Wayne features (The Green Berets and Hellfighters), he opted for television work when feature film roles became scarce. In DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK he departs from his usual cheerful persona and gives us an unsympathetic portrayal of male entitlement which alternates between condescension, irritation and disbelief. There is an undercurrent of seething anger in this character and one wonders if Hutton is channeling this from his dissatisfaction with his own career. Only at the climax of the movie, does Alex take action but not because of his wife’s insistence; it’s only because her friend Joan convinces him that evil is afoot. While DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK may not showcase Hutton at this best, it does display a side of him that was rarely seen until the end of his career. Just three years later he would star in the 1975 trash masterpiece PSYCHIC KILLER, an exploitation horror/fantasy that is a long way away from the romantic comedy days of The Honeymoon Machine (1961) or Sunday in New York (1973).

Kim Darby wasn’t having an easy time of it either after becoming an overnight star in True Grit in 1968 and feeling the pressure to accept leading roles in films she wasn’t always well suited for such as The Strawberry Statement (1970) and The Grissom Gang (1971). In an interview with Sam Tweedle on the Confessions of a Pop Culture Addict web site, she admitted that the Hollywood success machine made her feel self-conscious about her body: “I became an amphetamine addict.  There was a lot of pressure on me from True Grit that no matter what I did next I was [supposed to be the] leading lady.  I am not the leading lady.  I don’t get the guy.  I am a character actress and if they had left me alone, and if I had told them to leave me alone, I would not have been so conscious of my weight.” She also acknowledged that parts like her kidnapped heiress in The Grissom Gang were  miscalcuations and recalled that director Robert Aldrich’s son “was seated next to him [during the auditions] and afterwards he said “Dad, I don’t think she’s right.”  [Robert Aldrich] said “She may not be right, but she’ll play the hell out of it.”  Now I would have changed so many things on the way I did them and what I chose.  I don’t regret that at all, but they were looking at me and seeing what the outside wanted and they wanted me to be sexy and that was never my deal.” Aspects of Darby’s insecure and fragile heroine in DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK could be a reflection of the actress’s own reactions to her Hollywood experience. At any rate, Darby, like Hutton, retreated from the limelight to work in television in 1972 starting with The People, an intriguing tale about children with paranormal powers that co-starred William Shatner and Diane Varsi.

As for the evil little critters without whom DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK wouldn’t exist, they continue to exert a never-ending fascination among devotees of the film. Take, for example, this link to a fan who has created replicas of the creatures - http://www.yourprops.com/Don-t-Be-Afraid-of-the-Dark–Creatures-other-replicas-movie-props-Don-t-Be-Afraid-of-the-Dark–1973–prop-33824.html

I find the little dudes more comical than frightening – you never see more than three in the course of the film – and their voices are more appropriate for cartoon characters in a Disney feature. The overall effect might be creepier if you couldn’t actually hear what they are saying or couldn’t understand it. There is one moment in the film, however, where their malevolence is truly disturbing. It’s in the Psycho-inspired shower scene where one of the imps is creeping up on Sally with a straight razor. A brief discussion between two of the demons ensues:
Voice 1: Don’t hurt her. Not yet.
Voice 2: But I want to. I want to.
Voice 1: No, no.
Voice 2: Why?
Voice 1: Later…in the bedroom.
Voice 2: But I want to. I wanna get her.
Voice 1: No, wait until tomorrow. Tomorrow we’ll get her.
Voice 2. Let me just scare her then. I’ll scare her.

As much as I am fond of DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK, I welcome a remake of it unlike so many other films I cherish in their original versions. And I can’t think of a better person to guide the remake than Guillermo del Toro who created such amazing supernatural fantasy worlds in The Devil’s Backbone (2001) and Pan’s Labyrinth (2006). His new version, directed by comic illustrator Troy Nixey (“Batman: The Gasworks”, “Trout”), was initially conceived in 2008 for Miramax (which had been acquired by The Walt Disney Company in 1993) and completed in 2010. But its release was held up because Walt Disney sold Miramax to Filmyard Holdings in 2010 and didn’t want to release the film under the Disney banner. For those who don’t know, in the remake Sally is no longer a housewife but the young daughter (Bailee Madison) of an ambitious architect (Guy Pierce). They have moved into a crumbling mansion along with the father’s girlfriend (Katie Holmes) in the hope of restoring it and making the cover of Architectural Digest. From the preview on the official site, the film looks remarkably faithful – maybe too much so – to the original even down to the detail of revealing the creatures’ aversion to light and Sally’s use of a flash camera to ward them off. But I wonder if the original downbeat ending has been preserved and if that is the reason Disney got cold feet about releasing it? We’ll know soon enough but one thing’s for sure, this is the big budget revisionist version of DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK and we’ll see if it can resonate in the minds of viewers as long as the original has.

“…..It’s all just a matter of time. Of waiting for a while. All we have to do is bide our time. Bide our time. But it’s been so long. So many years. When will she come and set us free?….”

Other sites of interest:

http://lambiek.net/artists/n/nixey_troy.htm  Info on the director of DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (2010)

http://www.dontbeafraidofthedark.com/  The official web site of the new version

http://web.archive.org/web/20080822054718/http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/film/news/e3ia29ecfe7de636e2a7c5fb377df933630

http://popcultureaddict.com/this-week-at-pca-kim-darby/  Interview with Kim Darby

http://www.soiledsinema.com/2010/08/dont-be-afraid-of-dark-1973.html?zx=1a78b65273fce005

http://amandabynight.livejournal.com/18556.html?thread=22396  The Top Ten Made for TV Horror Films

http://mmmmmovies.blogspot.com/2008/04/dont-be-afraid-of-dark-1973-or-you-know.html


54 Responses Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (1973)
Posted By Medusa Morlock : July 10, 2011 11:49 am

Even as a devoted TVM watcher over the years, I don’t recall seeing this! What’s wrong with me?? I need to check this out, especially since I’m a fan of Kim Darby and all her always-good television work. She was really a TV face, not a movie actress, and did consistently excellent work on the small screen.

Great look at this memorable bit of ’70s horror!

Posted By Medusa Morlock : July 10, 2011 11:49 am

Even as a devoted TVM watcher over the years, I don’t recall seeing this! What’s wrong with me?? I need to check this out, especially since I’m a fan of Kim Darby and all her always-good television work. She was really a TV face, not a movie actress, and did consistently excellent work on the small screen.

Great look at this memorable bit of ’70s horror!

Posted By Richard A. Ekstedt : July 10, 2011 12:33 pm

A well made TV film that deserves to be on DVD as it is now. I only wish the brilliant, sadly forgotten, television chiller, “FEAR NO EVIL” (1969 Universal MCA),aired on NBC, starring Louis Jourdan, Linda Day George, Bradford Dillman and Carroll O’Conner (Directed by Paul Wendkos) will find its way to dvd in the future!!!!!!

Posted By Richard A. Ekstedt : July 10, 2011 12:33 pm

A well made TV film that deserves to be on DVD as it is now. I only wish the brilliant, sadly forgotten, television chiller, “FEAR NO EVIL” (1969 Universal MCA),aired on NBC, starring Louis Jourdan, Linda Day George, Bradford Dillman and Carroll O’Conner (Directed by Paul Wendkos) will find its way to dvd in the future!!!!!!

Posted By But Spindly Fingers Are Always Frightening | fol.lowfoc.us : July 10, 2011 1:18 pm

[...] lovely poster work being done for this remake of the 1973 made-for-TV chiller. (h/t to Movie Morlocks’ article on the original.) Posted on July 10, 2011 by Amy Robinson Categories: Images      [...]

Posted By But Spindly Fingers Are Always Frightening | fol.lowfoc.us : July 10, 2011 1:18 pm

[...] lovely poster work being done for this remake of the 1973 made-for-TV chiller. (h/t to Movie Morlocks’ article on the original.) Posted on July 10, 2011 by Amy Robinson Categories: Images      [...]

Posted By dukeroberts : July 10, 2011 2:10 pm

I think TV movies were better in the 70′s than they are now. They took more chances back then. TV movies now are usually “disease of the week” things or tales of women being raped and their struggle afterwards. And some of them were really good. I have heard quite a bit about this movie recently due to the upcoming remake. I would love to see it.

Posted By dukeroberts : July 10, 2011 2:10 pm

I think TV movies were better in the 70′s than they are now. They took more chances back then. TV movies now are usually “disease of the week” things or tales of women being raped and their struggle afterwards. And some of them were really good. I have heard quite a bit about this movie recently due to the upcoming remake. I would love to see it.

Posted By Jack Pendarvis : July 10, 2011 3:11 pm

“an unsympathetic portrayal of male entitlement which alternates between condescension, irritation and disbelief.” – That’s also a good description of Jim Hutton in WHO’S MINDING THE MINT, as I was surprised to discover when I recently watched it on TCM… it (WMTM) was a childhood favorite of mine, but I certainly didn’t remember Jim Hutton being so peevish in it! Not the way we usually think of him, but maybe there’s an unexamined flipside to his screen persona.

Posted By Jack Pendarvis : July 10, 2011 3:11 pm

“an unsympathetic portrayal of male entitlement which alternates between condescension, irritation and disbelief.” – That’s also a good description of Jim Hutton in WHO’S MINDING THE MINT, as I was surprised to discover when I recently watched it on TCM… it (WMTM) was a childhood favorite of mine, but I certainly didn’t remember Jim Hutton being so peevish in it! Not the way we usually think of him, but maybe there’s an unexamined flipside to his screen persona.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 10, 2011 4:23 pm

Not that you mention it, Hutton wasn’t exactly the carefree, lovable guy I thought I remembered in some of those romantic comedies. The jerk treats Paula Prentiss like dirt and makes her cry in WHERE THE BOYS ARE. And in the so-called Tennessee Williams comedy PERIOD OF ADJUSTMENT he’s a Korean War veteran with some very rigid ideas about a woman’s place in the home and marriage.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 10, 2011 4:23 pm

Not that you mention it, Hutton wasn’t exactly the carefree, lovable guy I thought I remembered in some of those romantic comedies. The jerk treats Paula Prentiss like dirt and makes her cry in WHERE THE BOYS ARE. And in the so-called Tennessee Williams comedy PERIOD OF ADJUSTMENT he’s a Korean War veteran with some very rigid ideas about a woman’s place in the home and marriage.

Posted By dukeroberts : July 10, 2011 5:56 pm

“Look at those lungs.” That’s what I remember from Where the Boys Are. Who wouldn’t be smitten by a hot mermaid? Poor Paula couldn’t compete with a hot mermaid.

Posted By dukeroberts : July 10, 2011 5:56 pm

“Look at those lungs.” That’s what I remember from Where the Boys Are. Who wouldn’t be smitten by a hot mermaid? Poor Paula couldn’t compete with a hot mermaid.

Posted By don_kessinger : July 10, 2011 6:28 pm

I’ve never forgotten this one – truly terrifying to the little kid I was then.

There was another early to mid-70s made for TV horror that similarly scared the bejeesus out of me. Perhaps someone here can remember the title? It was about a mother whose young son has unexpectedly died. Unable to accept his death she somehow conjures him back (using some unspeakable dark art?) but the youngster is not the same sweet kid. I guess this sounds a bit like Pet Sematary, but this is all I can remember.

Posted By don_kessinger : July 10, 2011 6:28 pm

I’ve never forgotten this one – truly terrifying to the little kid I was then.

There was another early to mid-70s made for TV horror that similarly scared the bejeesus out of me. Perhaps someone here can remember the title? It was about a mother whose young son has unexpectedly died. Unable to accept his death she somehow conjures him back (using some unspeakable dark art?) but the youngster is not the same sweet kid. I guess this sounds a bit like Pet Sematary, but this is all I can remember.

Posted By Jack Pendarvis : July 10, 2011 6:58 pm

Duke – Paula could compete with any mermaid as far as I’m concerned! Medusa… speaking of mermaids, do you remember the giant turtle/vengeful mermaid TV movie THE BERMUDA DEPTHS? One of (my wife) Theresa’s favorites, along with SATAN’S TRIANGLE. (I’m not sure she’s a mermaid… maybe just an underwater ghost.) Jeff… PERIOD OF ADJUSTMENT certainly is weirdly compelling. Let’s get to work on that Jim Hutton monograph the world is waiting for.

Posted By Jack Pendarvis : July 10, 2011 6:58 pm

Duke – Paula could compete with any mermaid as far as I’m concerned! Medusa… speaking of mermaids, do you remember the giant turtle/vengeful mermaid TV movie THE BERMUDA DEPTHS? One of (my wife) Theresa’s favorites, along with SATAN’S TRIANGLE. (I’m not sure she’s a mermaid… maybe just an underwater ghost.) Jeff… PERIOD OF ADJUSTMENT certainly is weirdly compelling. Let’s get to work on that Jim Hutton monograph the world is waiting for.

Posted By suzidoll : July 10, 2011 7:25 pm

I saw this film, as well as Trilogy of Terror and The Legend of Lizzie Borden, and I remember all of them well and fondly because they truly scared me as a child.

I have fond memories of Jim Hutton. He played the gangly, likable, regular guy. That was his star image, and it helped to keep his characters sympathetic when they did things you didn’t like or agree with. That’s the way the star system worked in part.

Posted By suzidoll : July 10, 2011 7:25 pm

I saw this film, as well as Trilogy of Terror and The Legend of Lizzie Borden, and I remember all of them well and fondly because they truly scared me as a child.

I have fond memories of Jim Hutton. He played the gangly, likable, regular guy. That was his star image, and it helped to keep his characters sympathetic when they did things you didn’t like or agree with. That’s the way the star system worked in part.

Posted By Juana Maria : July 10, 2011 7:48 pm

Do any of you horror fans out there remember a movie where monsters come up through the toilet? My cousin just told me about it when I was little and I had nightmares for the longest time. She used to scare me to pieces with Stephen King stories she had read. She told me about the “Tailey-poo” and some evil moneky with cymbals story. My dad love Stephen King and unwisely let us watch “IT”. I had nightmares from that too. To this day, my cousin and I can’t talk about “IT”. So scary and evil!

Posted By Juana Maria : July 10, 2011 7:48 pm

Do any of you horror fans out there remember a movie where monsters come up through the toilet? My cousin just told me about it when I was little and I had nightmares for the longest time. She used to scare me to pieces with Stephen King stories she had read. She told me about the “Tailey-poo” and some evil moneky with cymbals story. My dad love Stephen King and unwisely let us watch “IT”. I had nightmares from that too. To this day, my cousin and I can’t talk about “IT”. So scary and evil!

Posted By Wyatt Wingfoot : July 10, 2011 8:30 pm

Don, The one you’re thinking of is Dan Curtis’ 1977 trilogy of terror, DEAD OF NIGHT. The segment was called “Bobby” with Joan Hackett as the mother and Lee Montgomery as Bobby.

Posted By Wyatt Wingfoot : July 10, 2011 8:30 pm

Don, The one you’re thinking of is Dan Curtis’ 1977 trilogy of terror, DEAD OF NIGHT. The segment was called “Bobby” with Joan Hackett as the mother and Lee Montgomery as Bobby.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 10, 2011 8:51 pm

Juana, I think the movie you are thinking of is GHOULIES (1985).

See this link
http://www.fatally-yours.com/horror-reviews/ghoulies-1985/

Posted By morlockjeff : July 10, 2011 8:51 pm

Juana, I think the movie you are thinking of is GHOULIES (1985).

See this link
http://www.fatally-yours.com/horror-reviews/ghoulies-1985/

Posted By Juana Maria : July 14, 2011 2:20 pm

Thanks Morlock Jeff! I really appreciate your answering my question and providing a link. Can you help me again, please? There is an episode of “Alfred Hitchcock” either “Presents” or “Hour”, my Mom has distribed this episode all my life. She saw it when she was a little girl, and it gave her reocurring nightmares for years. It goes like this: there are 2 men in the jungle and one of them is sick in bed. He keeps telling his friend that there is a snake in his bed. No one beleves him, until some one gets bitten at the end of the show. Any one know the title of this one? Thanks.

Posted By Juana Maria : July 14, 2011 2:20 pm

Thanks Morlock Jeff! I really appreciate your answering my question and providing a link. Can you help me again, please? There is an episode of “Alfred Hitchcock” either “Presents” or “Hour”, my Mom has distribed this episode all my life. She saw it when she was a little girl, and it gave her reocurring nightmares for years. It goes like this: there are 2 men in the jungle and one of them is sick in bed. He keeps telling his friend that there is a snake in his bed. No one beleves him, until some one gets bitten at the end of the show. Any one know the title of this one? Thanks.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 14, 2011 2:47 pm

Juana, I’ve seen that episode and remember it well. I’m pretty sure the title of it is “Poison” and it stars Wendell Corey and James Donald. Here is a link to a description of it –
http://hitchcockandme.wordpress.com/2011/01/31/alfred-hitchcock-presents-alfred-hitchcock-presents-seasons-4-and-5/

Posted By morlockjeff : July 14, 2011 2:47 pm

Juana, I’ve seen that episode and remember it well. I’m pretty sure the title of it is “Poison” and it stars Wendell Corey and James Donald. Here is a link to a description of it –
http://hitchcockandme.wordpress.com/2011/01/31/alfred-hitchcock-presents-alfred-hitchcock-presents-seasons-4-and-5/

Posted By Jenni : July 14, 2011 4:32 pm

Don’t be afraid of the Dark!!!! I remember watching it afterschool, as one of the Toledo, OH stations had a movie scheduled M-F, 4-6, right before the evening news. I remember watching it, I must have been 10 or 11, and I kept wondering why didn’t, or couldn’t, Sally stomp on those little demon critters??!!

Posted By Jenni : July 14, 2011 4:32 pm

Don’t be afraid of the Dark!!!! I remember watching it afterschool, as one of the Toledo, OH stations had a movie scheduled M-F, 4-6, right before the evening news. I remember watching it, I must have been 10 or 11, and I kept wondering why didn’t, or couldn’t, Sally stomp on those little demon critters??!!

Posted By Jenni : July 14, 2011 4:37 pm

I also remember the Lizzie Borden movie being advertized on tv. My brother and I weren’t allowed to watch it, but hearing the haunting sing-song of local children singing that rhyming song about Lizzie killing her dad and step mom, the commercials for the movie aired that song, and it creeped me out as a kid!

Guy Pearce is an excellent actor, so I am sure he does a great job in the remake of DBAOTD, and Del Toro is also a great choice to helm the remake, but Kate Hudson? She’s become box office poison of late, playing shrewish nags, a gal pal who will stab you in the back, etc. Hoping her bad roles of late don’t harm the remake.

Posted By Jenni : July 14, 2011 4:37 pm

I also remember the Lizzie Borden movie being advertized on tv. My brother and I weren’t allowed to watch it, but hearing the haunting sing-song of local children singing that rhyming song about Lizzie killing her dad and step mom, the commercials for the movie aired that song, and it creeped me out as a kid!

Guy Pearce is an excellent actor, so I am sure he does a great job in the remake of DBAOTD, and Del Toro is also a great choice to helm the remake, but Kate Hudson? She’s become box office poison of late, playing shrewish nags, a gal pal who will stab you in the back, etc. Hoping her bad roles of late don’t harm the remake.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 14, 2011 4:43 pm

Katie Holmes is in the remake – not Kate Hudson – and Del Toro is only producing and co-writing the screenplay but that’s still a good sign.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 14, 2011 4:43 pm

Katie Holmes is in the remake – not Kate Hudson – and Del Toro is only producing and co-writing the screenplay but that’s still a good sign.

Posted By Jenni : July 14, 2011 10:04 pm

Phew! Katie Holmes, thanks for the correction!

Posted By Jenni : July 14, 2011 10:04 pm

Phew! Katie Holmes, thanks for the correction!

Posted By Juana Maria : July 15, 2011 11:20 am

Morlock Jeff thanks for your help once again! It is great to finally know the name of that episode.

Posted By Juana Maria : July 15, 2011 11:20 am

Morlock Jeff thanks for your help once again! It is great to finally know the name of that episode.

Posted By Juana Maria : July 16, 2011 6:07 pm

Morlock Jeff, I need your help again. I can remember watching only part of a cartoon back in the late 80′s or early 90′s, it was on our local FOX station(Not cable). It was about trolls, but not colorful, happy trolls. I am not referring to “Tales from the Cryptkeeper” or “Jim Henson’s Storyteller”:Truebride”. No, this was different, trolls were enslaving other trolls and making them work in their mines. Remember this one? Oh, it’s not “The Princess & the Goblin”. I’ve seen that one too.

Posted By Juana Maria : July 16, 2011 6:07 pm

Morlock Jeff, I need your help again. I can remember watching only part of a cartoon back in the late 80′s or early 90′s, it was on our local FOX station(Not cable). It was about trolls, but not colorful, happy trolls. I am not referring to “Tales from the Cryptkeeper” or “Jim Henson’s Storyteller”:Truebride”. No, this was different, trolls were enslaving other trolls and making them work in their mines. Remember this one? Oh, it’s not “The Princess & the Goblin”. I’ve seen that one too.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 16, 2011 8:08 pm

Juana,

I’d like to help but I’m no cartoon expert or connoisseur of troll movies. I’ve never even seen the original TROLL (1986) with the great Michael Moriarty as Harry Potter Sr. and co-stars Shelley Hack, Sonny Bono and the Lockhart family. Nor have I seen the documentary about the making of TROLL 2) or the new Norway indie sensation TROLLHUNTER. But deep inside I feel the urge to.

Posted By morlockjeff : July 16, 2011 8:08 pm

Juana,

I’d like to help but I’m no cartoon expert or connoisseur of troll movies. I’ve never even seen the original TROLL (1986) with the great Michael Moriarty as Harry Potter Sr. and co-stars Shelley Hack, Sonny Bono and the Lockhart family. Nor have I seen the documentary about the making of TROLL 2) or the new Norway indie sensation TROLLHUNTER. But deep inside I feel the urge to.

Posted By Tom S : July 16, 2011 8:23 pm

Please note that Troll 2 does not actually contain any trolls. To compensate, it contains the greatest volume of acting per actor I’ve ever seen.

Posted By Tom S : July 16, 2011 8:23 pm

Please note that Troll 2 does not actually contain any trolls. To compensate, it contains the greatest volume of acting per actor I’ve ever seen.

Posted By dukeroberts : July 16, 2011 8:34 pm

Actually, the documentary about Troll 2 is called Best Worst Movie and it is a hilarious documentary.

Posted By dukeroberts : July 16, 2011 8:34 pm

Actually, the documentary about Troll 2 is called Best Worst Movie and it is a hilarious documentary.

Posted By Juana Maria : July 17, 2011 12:44 pm

No, I’m not talking about the “Troll” movie, which I have seen. It is quite creepy. It was a cartoon on FOX. Anybody else know what I’m referring to?

Posted By Juana Maria : July 17, 2011 12:44 pm

No, I’m not talking about the “Troll” movie, which I have seen. It is quite creepy. It was a cartoon on FOX. Anybody else know what I’m referring to?

Posted By rh : July 27, 2011 4:27 am

Boy oh boy, wake me when Lionsgate “re-imagines” Bad Ronald! Ha!

Posted By rh : July 27, 2011 4:27 am

Boy oh boy, wake me when Lionsgate “re-imagines” Bad Ronald! Ha!

Posted By rory : September 4, 2011 9:34 am

any info on the original’s house? i’ve seen it on Logan’s Run (TV series) and The Magician i believe.

Posted By rory : September 4, 2011 9:34 am

any info on the original’s house? i’ve seen it on Logan’s Run (TV series) and The Magician i believe.

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