Happy Valentine’s Day to the Lost, Lonely, and Wicked

Today is Valentine’s Day, and I feel compelled to offer something related to the holiday, like so many other bloggers and sites are doing. However, instead of gearing my article toward couples by listing the best classic screwball comedies, contemporary romantic comedies, or other genres that exploit romance, relationships, and love, I turned to the other end of the romantic spectrum. My article is dedicated to singles, the recently divorced, and the unlucky in love, who will appreciate this list of favorite movies about failed relationships, heartbreak, and heartache.

My list includes movies in which the boy and the girl do not end up in “the clinch,” that slang word used by industry personnel during the Golden Age to refer to the last shot of a film in which the heroic protagonist and leading lady embrace, kiss, hug, or look longingly into each other’s eyes. The clinch signifies a happy ending, suggesting that order had been restored and society and its institutions are intact. Because viewers are accustomed to seeing the clinch, particularly in classic films, those movies that do not conclude this way are all the more tragic, memorable, or meaningful.

My list is dominated by films in which the relationship fails because of the characters’ personal flaws, mistakes, hubris, or pride—not because one dies and leaves the other behind.  Death doesn’t necessarily defeat love, but human frailty can. Again, this point of view is atypical of Hollywood’s treatment of romance and marriage, particularly during the era of the Production Code, which mandated that marriage was a sacred institution and should never be cast in a negative light. For that reason, my list is heavily weighted toward films released after the Golden Age, though I stayed clear of recent Hollywood titles already familiar to most, including Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The English Patient, 500 Days of Summer, and The Break Up.  Finally, while I was tempted to include the horror flick My Bloody Valentine, I opted for well-crafted movies that most can appreciate, no matter their current relationship status.

THE ROCKY, STORMY MOORS ARE A SYMBOL OF HEATHCLIFF AND CATHY'S TURBULENT LOVE IN 'WUTHERING HEIGHTS.'

Wuthering Heights (1939). Emile Bronte’s gothic romance has been filmed many times, but this Golden Age version directed by William Wyler offers potent star turns by Merle Oberon and Laurence Olivier as star-crossed lovers Cathy and Heathcliff. Set in the early nineteenth century, the story follows headstrong Cathy and ill-bred Heathcliff from their childhood on the moors to maturity, when she becomes enamored with the wealthy lifestyle of a neighbor and marries him. Heathcliff’s revenge is to leave the moors and return a refined gentleman, attracting the affections of Cathy’s sister-in-law. Cathy and Heathcliff brood, obsess, and taunt each other until she dies of fever, leaving him a haunted man. Wyler and cinematographer Gregg Toland visualized the English moors as dark, shadowy, and windswept—creating the archetypal look for this legendary part of Britain. Remote, rocky, and stormy, the moors are a visual representation of Cathy and Heathcliff’s tormented romance.

LIGHTING CIGARETTES BECOMES A SIGNIFIER OF INTIMACY IN 'NOW, VOYAGER.'

Now, Voyager (1942).  Bette Davis stars as Charlotte Vale, a dowdy spinster who sheds her mousy look along with her repression with the help of a psychiatrist. When the new Charlotte travels to South America, she enjoys a shipboard romance with married man Jerry, played by Paul Henreid. Considering the restrictions of the Production Code regarding adultery, it’s a given that Jerry and Charlotte can never be together, let alone consummate their love.  Jerry’s wife and Charlotte’s mother are both domineering matriarchs who have psychologically damaged their children. Charlotte volunteers to help Jerry’s troubled daughter—her motherly love for the child presented as an acceptable substitute for the romantic love she feels for Jerry.  She gladly agrees to this arrangement, assuring Jerry that she does not need to be anyone’s wife, declaring in the film’s most famous line, “Don’t let’s ask for the moon. We have the stars.”

The strict dictates of the Code, which mandate that Charlotte and Jerry will never engage in a physical affair, gives the film its most romantic motif. When the couple is alone, Jerry puts two cigarettes in his mouth, then passes one to Charlotte. The gesture takes on such an intimate connotation that it is downright erotic. It at once suggests the limits of their relationship while implying the depth of their longing.

IN 'SOME CAME RUNNING," THE MARRIAGE OF DAVE (SINATRA) AND GINNIE (MacLAINE) IS DOOMED.

Some Came Running (1958). Vincente Minnelli’s melodrama of James Jones’s novel stars Frank Sinatra as war veteran Dave Hirsh, who is profoundly dissatisfied with the materialism and false values of postwar America. Given a choice between the hypocrisies of polite society and the degenerate company of riff-raff, he chooses the latter, much to his middle-class brother’s chagrin. Though he is better suited to college English teacher Gwen French, he marries Ginnie, a floozie with a heart of gold who loves him unconditionally. Shirley MacLaine plays Ginnie, a broadly drawn character given poignancy through MacLaine’s performance. Ginnie wants Dave, who wants Gwen, who wants to change Dave—and no one gets what they want. An aura of futility and doom hangs over the film, which is made concrete through a nihilistic character played by Dean Martin. As a gambler who accepts that the game of life is rigged, Martin plays the character as too cool for the room.

Considering the opposing forces in the film—proper society vs. gamblers and drinkers, moral vs. immoral, conformity vs. nonconformity, educated college professor vs. bar girl—a clash of epic proportions is inevitable. Minnelli was a stylist whose use of color and set design made him an accomplished director of musicals. The climactic sequence of Some Came Running takes place in a cheap carnival, where Minnelli’s trademark use of primary colors, particularly red, creates a garish setting for the act of violence that seals the ill fates of the characters.

WOOD AND BEATTY IN THE LAST SCENE OF 'SPLENDOR IN THE GRASS'

Splendor in the Grass (1961). In this steamy melodrama from Elia Kazan, Natalie Wood stars as Deanie Loomis , the best of her roles in which she played a young woman too vulnerable for the emotional baggage that comes with a passionate love affair. Splendor in the Grass is the highpoint of this phase of her career, which also included This Property Is Condemned, Inside Daisy Clover and All the Fine Young Cannibals. Wood and costar Warren Beatty play flapper-era teenagers of the Jazz Age who struggle with the intensity of first love and the sexual urges that come with it. Just as the era comes to screeching halt with the stock market crash, so does Deanie explode from her repressed desires, resulting in a nervous breakdown, while Beatty’s character, Bud, burns out in college.

Fans of the film live for the final scene, which perfectly conveys the bittersweet experience of two lovers who realize the relationship is over while feelings still linger.  Bud and Deanie meet again after much water has gone under the bridge. Bud marries a waitress he met in college before dropping out, and they live in poverty on a ranch on the outskirts of town. Deanie is engaged to a nice young man she met at the facility where she recovered from her breakdown. When the star-crossed lovers meet, the atmosphere is thick with unstated regret and longing. They cannot go back but they know they will never feel that level of intense passion again. The title is from a William Wordsworth poem: “. . . nothing can bring back the hour of splendor in the grass . . . .”

STAR POWER DRIVES 'THE WAY WE WERE.'

The Way We Were (1973). Sidney Pollack directed this widely popular romantic drama with the equally famous theme song. Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford play opposites who love each other but are ill-suited as a couple. The film follows their radically different characters from college in the 1930s through courtship during WWII and then marriage in the postwar era.  She’s a working class idealist involved in social causes; he’s an upper-crust pragmatist who prefers the path of least resistance.  Their romance unfolds against American socio-political history of the 1930s and 1940s, from the Spanish Civil War through the investigations by the House on UnAmerican Activities  Committee. The film presupposes that viewers know that history; there is little exposition devoted to explaining it. As I was thinking about this film, I realized how times have changed. The Way We Were was typical of its era in that it was a romantic drama with two major stars directed by a Hollywood veteran who knew his way around the classic narrative style. In retrospect, the historical references, charismatic performances, and craftsmanship stand out in comparison to today’s mainstream films, which are aimed at a young demographic raised on snarky cynicism and unmoved by history.

One of Pollack’s talents was his ability to get terrific performances from movie stars while taking full advantage of their larger-than-life charisma and physical appearances. Redford collaborated on half dozen films with Pollack, and the pair sometimes used the star’s all-American good looks to create flawed characters who trade on their handsome features. Redford lets his physical appearance and charisma do most of the work to create the character of Hubbell Gardiner for whom things come too easily.  Streisand plays a working-class girl who is not naturally attractive and not unaccustomed to winning the handsome prince—like most of us. In the end, she can’t keep him and remain true to herself—like most of us. In the coda to the film, they run into each other years later. Both actors underplay the poignant reunion, making it more effective and moving. In the film’s most memorable shot, Streisand brushes the hair from Redford’s forehead—the only sign of her lingering feelings.

BEATTY AND CHRISTIE IN 'SHAMPOO'

Shampoo (1975), which was cowritten and coproduced by Warren Beatty, is another film set against the backdrop of history. This comedy of manners focuses on sex, politics, and power among the rich and jaded of Hollywood. It’s set against the backdrop of Election Day, 1968, when Richard Nixon was elected president. Beatty stars as his alter-ego George, a womanizing beautician who wants to open his own hair shop. It’s almost impossible not to see the real-life Beatty in the fictional George, who beds many women in his attempt to get backing for his shop, but he ends up sadder and not much wiser. The film has been interpreted as pointed commentary on the end of 1960s idealism and the return to conservative politics, which signaled the beginning of the self-absorbed “Me Generation.”

Beatty engaged in self-reflexive casting by signing ex-girlfriend Julie Christie to play George’s ex-lover Jackie—which gives their scenes together a personal subtext. Christie left Beatty largely because of his philandering, like Jackie left George over his affairs with his clients. After years apart, Jackie and George accidentally meet, and it is clear he carries a torch for her, though she is the willing mistress of Lester, a wealthy businessman. Rejecting love as an impractical ideal, Jackie ultimately chooses the financial security of her life with Lester over her affection for George. In the last scene, he stands on one of the hills overlooking Hollywood, watching Jackie—and his chances for happiness—drive away with Lester.

KEATON AND ALLEN RELIVE AND REWORK THEIR ROMANCE IN 'ANNIE HALL.'

Annie Hall (1977). Woody Allen goes a step further than Beatty by casting former girlfriend Diane Keaton in the title role of this remarkably smart comedy that offers a fictionalized version of their real-life relationship.  Allen deftly combines autobiography, personal observation, and cultural references for a funny but perceptive analysis of modern relationships. Self-reflexive but unpretentious, the humor masks the complexity of the narrative structure and the smartness of the dialogue. Despite the autobiographical element, the storyline chronicles the arc of a relationship from beginning to post-breakup, making it a universal experience. After their breakup, Allen’s character, Alvy Singer, flies to California to rekindle the relationship, but Annie rebuffs him.  Just as the real-life Allen revisited his relationship with Keaton via Annie Hall, so the fictional Alvy reworks his relationship with Annie into a play. In a heartbreaking twist, Alvy gives his play a happy ending, which Allen cannot bring himself to do in Annie Hall. For Alvy Singer, art provides a fantasy version of real life to escape its disappointments; for Woody Allen, art reflects real life to put it into perspective.

GENEVIEVE BUJOLD AND KRIS KRISTOFFERSON IN 'TROUBLE IN MIND.'

Trouble in Mind (1985) and Choose Me (1984). I have a soft spot for director Alan Rudolph, largely because of these two eccentric films. I paired them together as one entry because both thrive on a moody, noir-like atmosphere and a nocturnal fantasy world where the jazz is always smooth and the characters melancholy. Choose Me is the most appropriate for Valentine’s Day because it underscores the mystery that is romantic love. Keith Carradine plays Mickey, a pathological liar who romances both sex therapist  Nancy Love (Genevieve Bujold) and bar owner Eve (Lesley Ann Warren). Other characters weave in and out of the story in a passionate dance of sex and love, only to find that the first is short-lived and the latter fleeting.

Trouble In Mind is less successful than Choose Me, but I prefer it because Kris Kristofferson is irresistible as a doomed former detective just out of prison who falls for a naïve young girl, while his former girlfriend (Bujold, again) watches on the sidelines. Set in the fictional Rain City, the highly stylized film harkens back to the hard-boiled noirs of the 1940 while suggesting some grim future dominated by mobsters and corruption. The film uses the language of movies and what we know about them, particularly westerns and film noir, to communicate narrative and suggest character.

KATHLEEN TURNER TAKES HER SHOT IN 'WAR OF THE ROSES.'

War of the Roses (1989). Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, and Danny DeVito reunited for a third time to make this dark, disturbing comedy about the pitfalls of marriage. War of the Roses is the opposite of their romantic fantasies Romancing the Stone and The Jewel of the Nile—a move that took fans by surprise. Douglas and Turner play a materialistic, consumer-driven couple, Oliver and Barbara Rose, whose picture-perfect marriage has deteriorated beyond repair. In the throes of divorce, their battleground—literally—becomes their house, which Oliver bought but Barbara decorated to perfection. Both live in the house to establish ownership during the divorce proceedings, which leads to threats, spiteful maneuvers, sabotage, and physical violence between husband and wife. DeVito also directed the film, and to suggest that Oliver and Barbara have become crazed in their revenge, he depicts the concluding sequence of mass destruction with expressionist techniques. Dutch camera angles, dark shadows, and a confining set design amplify the chaos of the ruined house and also convey the warped minds of the Roses. The film begins as a sweet romantic comedy that plays off the chemistry between Turner and Douglas, but soon the main characters turn unsympathetic, an escalating bitterness wipes out any trace of romance, and the final scene will shock fans of the genre. Rent this movie on date night only if you want to get rid of the person you are dating.

SHADOW BARS SEPARATE THE ALIENATED CHARACTERS WHILE PRIMARY COLORS SYMBOLIZE THEIR UNLEASHED PASSION IN 'IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE.'

In the Mood for Love (2000). While several films by Chinese director Wong Kar-Wai could easily fit this list, including Happy Together and 2046, I chose In the Mood for Love, because the melancholy in this romantic melodrama is almost tangible. Set in Hong Kong in the early 1960s, the story involves a relationship-that-never-was between Chow Mo-Wan (Tony Leung) and Mrs. Chan, (Maggie Cheung), who are neighbors in the same housing complex. One day, they discover that their spouses are having an affair with one another. Devastated, they spend evenings together rehearsing ways to confront their spouses and reenacting scenarios that might help them figure out how the affair began. They forge a deep but painful bond, though they will never act on it because they have vowed never to behave like their partners. Restrained by fidelity and morality, they can never express their feelings.

Wong is famous for using mise-en-scene to suggest the plight of the characters. In Mood, Mo-Wan and Mrs. Chan rarely inhabit the same shot to underscore their decision not to be together. Likewise, the set design of narrow, turning corridors helps to obscure one of the two characters behind a corner or door, or they are visually separated by frames or shadows. The unfaithful spouses, whose infidelity drives the two protagonists together, remain mostly off camera, their faces unseen. An oversaturated color palette symbolizes the heightened feelings of the characters, who cannot openly reveal them, while also infusing the frames’ negative spaces with vibrant color.  One of the most romantic touches is the use of slow-motion shots of cigarette smoke, with the wisps of the smoke slowly dissipating into nothing—not unlike the promise of romance.

32 Responses Happy Valentine’s Day to the Lost, Lonely, and Wicked
Posted By dukeroberts : February 14, 2011 1:56 pm

My mother and sister would be sad to see that Gone with the Wind was not on the list, but that’s a big “Duh”. Anyone could think of that one. I would have to add Casablanca, although it doesn’t necesarily fit your theme, it is the movie I always go to after I have a bad date. I have seen Casablanca about 53 times.

Posted By dukeroberts : February 14, 2011 1:56 pm

My mother and sister would be sad to see that Gone with the Wind was not on the list, but that’s a big “Duh”. Anyone could think of that one. I would have to add Casablanca, although it doesn’t necesarily fit your theme, it is the movie I always go to after I have a bad date. I have seen Casablanca about 53 times.

Posted By Britain Callen : February 14, 2011 2:28 pm

I really enjoyed this article Suzi. I also think you would be proud to know that I’ve seen a couple of these movies on the list already!!! Annie Hall is actually one of my favorites of Diane Keaton. She is my favorite actress of “now” I guess you would say, mainly because she is not the stereo-typical actress, at least she never was to me. I saw Splendor in the Grass about a million years ago though I was never able to finish it, so now I know how it ends lol. I also caught the Way We Were on television one late night when I found I couldn’t fall asleep and thoroughly enjoyed it, including the scene you mentioned where she brushes the hair off of Robert Redford’s face. Very good selections and I will have to keep my eye out for the other ones!

Posted By Britain Callen : February 14, 2011 2:28 pm

I really enjoyed this article Suzi. I also think you would be proud to know that I’ve seen a couple of these movies on the list already!!! Annie Hall is actually one of my favorites of Diane Keaton. She is my favorite actress of “now” I guess you would say, mainly because she is not the stereo-typical actress, at least she never was to me. I saw Splendor in the Grass about a million years ago though I was never able to finish it, so now I know how it ends lol. I also caught the Way We Were on television one late night when I found I couldn’t fall asleep and thoroughly enjoyed it, including the scene you mentioned where she brushes the hair off of Robert Redford’s face. Very good selections and I will have to keep my eye out for the other ones!

Posted By Debbie A-H : February 14, 2011 2:29 pm

Thanks for the list. A few of my favorites, but there are a few I’m putting on my list to view.

Posted By Debbie A-H : February 14, 2011 2:29 pm

Thanks for the list. A few of my favorites, but there are a few I’m putting on my list to view.

Posted By Britain Callen : February 14, 2011 2:29 pm

p.s. though it doesnt fit your theme as well, my pick would have been Roman Holiday (:

Posted By Britain Callen : February 14, 2011 2:29 pm

p.s. though it doesnt fit your theme as well, my pick would have been Roman Holiday (:

Posted By debbe : February 14, 2011 3:03 pm

i think this is one of your best suzi doll. i love every film you mentioned and love the theme. I like how yet again you are able to place the movies we love in important context even as you describe the films in a picture perfect way. Ive seen every movie but one,in the mood for love… and will try and look for it.. this was great…

Posted By debbe : February 14, 2011 3:03 pm

i think this is one of your best suzi doll. i love every film you mentioned and love the theme. I like how yet again you are able to place the movies we love in important context even as you describe the films in a picture perfect way. Ive seen every movie but one,in the mood for love… and will try and look for it.. this was great…

Posted By DBenson : February 14, 2011 5:10 pm

I’d make room for The Apartment somewhere. While the plot is cheerful romcom 101 — mensch wins girl from rich jerk by being a mensch — it’s played out with amazing darkness and cynicism.

It’s a movie that shouldn’t work, but does. And you can say the same about a lot of relationships.

Posted By DBenson : February 14, 2011 5:10 pm

I’d make room for The Apartment somewhere. While the plot is cheerful romcom 101 — mensch wins girl from rich jerk by being a mensch — it’s played out with amazing darkness and cynicism.

It’s a movie that shouldn’t work, but does. And you can say the same about a lot of relationships.

Posted By michaelgloversmith : February 14, 2011 8:30 pm

Love your comments on Some Came Running. You really nail how pessimistic the end of that film is, which always surprises me every time I see it. There is really no hope for Dave and Gwen and ‘Bama is clearly going to drink himself to death.

Posted By michaelgloversmith : February 14, 2011 8:30 pm

Love your comments on Some Came Running. You really nail how pessimistic the end of that film is, which always surprises me every time I see it. There is really no hope for Dave and Gwen and ‘Bama is clearly going to drink himself to death.

Posted By Patrick : February 14, 2011 11:58 pm

I cannot disagree with you…except on Shampoo, I never really cared for that.

Posted By Patrick : February 14, 2011 11:58 pm

I cannot disagree with you…except on Shampoo, I never really cared for that.

Posted By dukeroberts : February 15, 2011 12:15 am

I know that I will probably be basted in oil and deep-fried, but I think Annie Hall is overrated and that Star Wars should have won best picture that year. Oops.

Posted By dukeroberts : February 15, 2011 12:15 am

I know that I will probably be basted in oil and deep-fried, but I think Annie Hall is overrated and that Star Wars should have won best picture that year. Oops.

Posted By Jenni : February 15, 2011 12:49 am

I enjoyed your post,Suzie, as usual. You do such a good job in conveying your ideas about films, and educate the readers,too. I have seen the title of Some Came Running, but had never seen it and didn’t know it was a book by the same author of From Here to Eternity. Since I like to read, perhaps I’ll get SCR from my local library. Another movie I’d add would be The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, because it has a bit of a similar ending as Wuthering Heights, that the two lovers are together at last, but not until both have died. Also, one more idea would be Waterloo Bridge.

Posted By Jenni : February 15, 2011 12:49 am

I enjoyed your post,Suzie, as usual. You do such a good job in conveying your ideas about films, and educate the readers,too. I have seen the title of Some Came Running, but had never seen it and didn’t know it was a book by the same author of From Here to Eternity. Since I like to read, perhaps I’ll get SCR from my local library. Another movie I’d add would be The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, because it has a bit of a similar ending as Wuthering Heights, that the two lovers are together at last, but not until both have died. Also, one more idea would be Waterloo Bridge.

Posted By suzidoll : February 15, 2011 1:05 am

Thanks for the compliments, everyone, as well as the additions to the list. There are some good suggestions here. My readers rock.

Posted By suzidoll : February 15, 2011 1:05 am

Thanks for the compliments, everyone, as well as the additions to the list. There are some good suggestions here. My readers rock.

Posted By Kingrat : February 15, 2011 6:36 pm

Really enjoyed your post, suzidoll. Anyone who grooves to Choose Me and Trouble in Mind is a movie BFF. Both do have happy endings of a kind, but in Trouble in Mind Kristofferson picks the girl over the woman, and Genevieve Bujold is the one we (I) feel for.

The Way We Were is very much about a one-sided love affair. 60/40 relationships work, 90/10 relationships don’t. To me the film is more realistic and less romantic than its reputation would have it.

Like Duke, I’m not the biggest fan of Annie Hall. Woody treats Keaton as if she were Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday, but to me she’s more like Sandy Dennis in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Another interesting film for your collection is Enchantment, with Teresa Wright, David Niven, and Jayne Meadows.

Elia Kazan wrote that Splendor in the Grass had the best final reel of any of his films, for exactly the reasons that you mention.

Posted By Kingrat : February 15, 2011 6:36 pm

Really enjoyed your post, suzidoll. Anyone who grooves to Choose Me and Trouble in Mind is a movie BFF. Both do have happy endings of a kind, but in Trouble in Mind Kristofferson picks the girl over the woman, and Genevieve Bujold is the one we (I) feel for.

The Way We Were is very much about a one-sided love affair. 60/40 relationships work, 90/10 relationships don’t. To me the film is more realistic and less romantic than its reputation would have it.

Like Duke, I’m not the biggest fan of Annie Hall. Woody treats Keaton as if she were Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday, but to me she’s more like Sandy Dennis in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Another interesting film for your collection is Enchantment, with Teresa Wright, David Niven, and Jayne Meadows.

Elia Kazan wrote that Splendor in the Grass had the best final reel of any of his films, for exactly the reasons that you mention.

Posted By Laurie : February 15, 2011 9:29 pm

Watching Now, Voyager has become a Valentine’s Day tradition for me. It’s tragically romantic but with an ending filled with promise. By the way, Jerry and Charlotte do lock lips a few times. However, the cigarettes are much more memorable.

Posted By Laurie : February 15, 2011 9:29 pm

Watching Now, Voyager has become a Valentine’s Day tradition for me. It’s tragically romantic but with an ending filled with promise. By the way, Jerry and Charlotte do lock lips a few times. However, the cigarettes are much more memorable.

Posted By suzidoll : February 15, 2011 10:41 pm

Laurie: What a great V-Day tradition. It has been a few years since I last saw NOW, VOYAGER, and the cigarette scenes are so memorable I had no memory of Charlotte and Jerry kissing. Thanks for setting the record straight. I appreciate it. I went back and made the correction because I don’t want to perpetuate misinformation.

Posted By suzidoll : February 15, 2011 10:41 pm

Laurie: What a great V-Day tradition. It has been a few years since I last saw NOW, VOYAGER, and the cigarette scenes are so memorable I had no memory of Charlotte and Jerry kissing. Thanks for setting the record straight. I appreciate it. I went back and made the correction because I don’t want to perpetuate misinformation.

Posted By dukeroberts : February 16, 2011 12:36 am

Kingrat- I don’t know if I would insult Diane Keaton that harshly. Of course she’s no Audrey Hepburn (who, other than Audrey, is?), but Sandy Dennis? Ouch! I think 70′s Diane Keaton is more like Jill Clayburgh, but slightly prettier.

Posted By dukeroberts : February 16, 2011 12:36 am

Kingrat- I don’t know if I would insult Diane Keaton that harshly. Of course she’s no Audrey Hepburn (who, other than Audrey, is?), but Sandy Dennis? Ouch! I think 70′s Diane Keaton is more like Jill Clayburgh, but slightly prettier.

Posted By Lisa W. : February 17, 2011 11:45 am

Great list! Some I’ve seen and some not— very excited to put Some Came Running on my list and In the Mood for Love. This is the best (anti-)valentine! Thanks, Suzi.

Posted By Lisa W. : February 17, 2011 11:45 am

Great list! Some I’ve seen and some not— very excited to put Some Came Running on my list and In the Mood for Love. This is the best (anti-)valentine! Thanks, Suzi.

Leave a Reply

Current ye@r *

MovieMorlocks.com is the official blog for TCM. No topic is too obscure or niche to be excluded from our film discussions. And we welcome your comments on our blogs and bloggers.
See more: facebook.com/tcmtv
See more: twitter.com/tcm
3-D  Action Films  Actors  Actors' Endorsements  Actresses  animal stars  Animation  Anime  Anthology Films  Art in Movies  Australian CInema  Autobiography  Avant-Garde  Aviation  Awards  B-movies  Beer in Film  Behind the Scenes  Best of the Year lists  Biography  Biopics  Blu-Ray  Books on Film  Boxing films  British Cinema  Canadian Cinema  Character Actors  Chicago Film History  Cinematography  Classic Films  College Life on Film  Comedy  Comic Book Movies  Crime  Czech Film  Dance on Film  Digital Cinema  Directors  Disaster Films  Documentary  Drama  DVD  Early Talkies  Editing  Educational Films  European Influence on American Cinema  Experimental  Exploitation  Fairy Tales on Film  Faith or Christian-based Films  Family Films  Film Composers  Film Criticism  film festivals  Film History in Florida  Film Noir  Film Scholars  Film titles  Filmmaking Techniques  Films of the 1960s  Films of the 1980s  Food in Film  Foreign Film  French Film  Gangster films  Genre  Genre spoofs  HD & Blu-Ray  Holiday Movies  Hollywood history  Hollywood lifestyles  Horror  Horror Movies  Icons  independent film  Italian Film  Japanese Film  Korean Film  Literary Adaptations  Martial Arts  Melodramas  Method Acting  Mexican Cinema  Moguls  Monster Movies  Movie Books  Movie Costumes  movie flops  Movie locations  Movie lovers  Movie Reviewers  Movie settings  Movie Stars  Movie titles  Movies about movies  Music in Film  Musicals  Outdoor Cinema  Paranoid Thrillers  Parenting on film  Pirate movies  Polish film industry  political thrillers  Politics in Film  Pornography  Pre-Code  Producers  Race in American Film  Remakes  Revenge  Road Movies  Romance  Romantic Comedies  Satire  Scandals  Science Fiction  Screenwriters  Semi-documentaries  Serials  Short Films  Silent Film  silent films  Social Problem Film  Sports  Sports on Film  Stereotypes  Straight-to-DVD  Studio Politics  Stunts and stuntmen  Suspense thriller  Swashbucklers  TCM Classic Film Festival  TCM Underground  Television  The British in Hollywood  The Germans in Hollywood  The Hungarians in Hollywood  The Irish in Hollywood  Theaters  Thriller  Trains in movies  Underground Cinema  VOD  War film  Westerns  Women in the Film Industry  Women's Weepies