The Many Roles of Mick Jagger

The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness.Performance (1970)

If someone asked me the proverbial question: “The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?” I’d pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock ‘n’ roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band’s American Tour in ’81. And one of the first records I ever bought for myself was Some Girls; their controversial 1978 album featuring hit songs like “Beast of Burden,” “Shattered” and “Miss You.” Some Girls inevitably lost some of its luster when I discovered the band’s earlier recordings but it was the record that introduced me to The Rolling Stones and thanks to repeated listenings I started to understand just how raunchy and rebellious rock ‘n’ roll was supposed to be. Discovering the band at any age can be a thrilling experience but when you’re going through puberty The Rolling Stones seem positively electric. Their music was the perfect conduit for all my teenage daydreams and nightmares.

My interest in the band undoubtedly spiked when my mother made it clear that she was not a fan. She preferred The Beatles and found her young daughter’s obsession in the aging Rolling Stones more than a little odd. My mother and I had lots of arguments about my musical interests and extracurricular activities while I was growing up but she let me go to a Rolling Stones concert when I just 13-years-old. Somehow she managed to enable my obsession with the band at the same time that she was deriding it. Parents can be funny like that. I became fascinated with the band’s androgynous thick-lipped front man, Sir Michael Philip “Mick” Jagger and I enjoyed plastering my walls with pictures of The Rolling Stones that often featured “old rubber lips” seductively posed with a microphone. Like the romantic British poets before him, Mick Jagger seemed mad, bad and dangerous to know and I found his formidable reputation incredibly intriguing. It didn’t matter to me that he was old enough to be my father.

During my early teens I read books about The Rolling Stones and sought out movies that featured the band such as the Albert and David Maysles concert film Gimme Shelter (1970). Around the same time I also discovered Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg’s earth-shattering film Performance (1970), which starred a very young Mick Jagger. I rarely refer to any movie as “earth-shattering” but that’s exactly what Performance was to me when I first saw it at an impressionable young age. Performance changed the way I experienced film from that moment forward and it helped shape my expectations of what a movie could and should be.

In the film Mick Jagger plays Turner, a washed-up, drug-fueled and sexually uninhibited rock star. The character of Turner was originally based on Brian Jones who helped form The Rolling Stones along with Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards but Jagger inhabited the role completely. He brought his own particular kind of charm and seductiveness to the character that shocked critics and audiences when the film was originally released. Even today the character of Turner still seems incredibly subversive. During the early ’80s the film played regularly at midnight showings in the Bay Area so I was able to see it a few times before it became available on video. Much of the movie’s complicated subtext and magick was lost on me when I was growing up but over the years I’ve learned to enjoy and embrace the rich tapestry of ideas that make up Performance. It’s not an easy film to recommend because like an untamed monster, the movie has teeth and a desire to devour its audience. But don’t let that scare you! Performance can simply be enjoyed as an unorthodox look at the British underworld in the ’60s complete with gangsters, dangerous femme fatales and a reclusive rock star. It’s an unforgettable slice of pop culture history and it’s playing on TCM Underground this Friday on June 11th. To read more about the film and find out when it’s showing in your area I recommend visiting the official TCM Underground site where you’ll find an informative piece about Performance written by my fellow Morlock, Richard Harland Smith. Mick Jagger has been featured in many musical documentaries about The Rolling Stones over the years but he’s also continued to pursue acting. I thought it would be fun to share some of my favorite clips from other movies that Mick Jagger has appeared in.

After making Performance Jagger continued to act in films but he never got a part that was as provocative or as interesting as the role of Turner. His next film was Tony Richardson’s biopic about the infamous Australian bushranger (runaway convict) Ned Kelly (1970). The idea of playing a notorious criminal must have seemed incredibly appealing to British born Jagger but he didn’t fit the image of a rough and tumble Australian outlaw and the making of Ned Kelly was plagued with problems. Jagger brought his longtime girlfriend and fellow musician Marianne Faithfull along with him to Sidney when shooting started but their relationship was coming to a harrowing end and she attempted suicide by overdosing on sleeping pills. Faithfull ended up in a coma but thankfully she recovered and returned to England while Mick Jagger stayed behind and tried to finish the movie. Jagger’s acting limitations are apparent when you watch Ned Kelly, which required a lot from its star. The film got abysmal reviews but Tony Richardson is a talented director and I think the movie contains some noteworthy moments. I’m particularly fond of the film’s powerful opening sequence that ends with Ned Kelly being hung. It’s a disturbing way to start any film and it undoubtedly surprised a lot of Jagger’s fans when it was originally released. In another one of my favorite moments from Ned Kelly Mick Jagger sings the traditional Irish/Australian ballad “The Wild Colonial Boy.”

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yr7bBaC86pY&hl=en_US&fs=1&]

Around the same time Mick Jagger appeared in an experimental Italian film called Umano non Umano (aka Human Not Human; 1969) shot by the artist Mario Schifano. Schifano would later gain notoriety as the man who supposedly helped break up Mick Jagger’s relationship with Marianne Faithfull but the artist was obviously friendly with the band for a period of time when this film was shot. Umano non Umano is an interesting collage of sights and sounds without any obvious narrative structure and it also contains an appearance by Jagger’s bandmate Keith Richards. The following clip from Umano non Umano features Mick Jagger mouthing the words to one of my favorite Rolling Stone’s songs, “Street Fighting Man.”

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNMZhuEg6xg&hl=en_US&fs=1&]

The lackluster critical response to Ned Kelly seemed to put a damper on Mick Jagger’s acting career. He supposedly auditioned for the role of Dr. Frank-N-Furter in the film adaptation of The Rocky Horror Picture Show (Jim Sharman; 1975) but didn’t get it and although he was cast in Werner Herzog award-winning film Fitzcarraldo (Werner Herzog ; 1982) alongside costar Jason Robards, his part was later written out of the script when both actors were replaced by Klaus Kinski. Jagger did make a brief and very funny appearance in The Beatles mockumentary The Rutles: All You Need is Cash (Eric Idle; 1978) that I couldn’t resist sharing.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDY8VErLhcY&hl=en_US&fs=1&]

It would be almost 10 years before Mick Jagger would appear in another movie. Unfortunately that movie was Julian Temple’s Running Out of Luck (1987). The film was really just a poorly compiled video advertisement for Jagger’s first solo album, She’s the Boss and it’s a forgettable lightweight affair. The film does contain a few funny moments and in this comical scene Mick Jagger tries to convince some Brazilian shop owners that he’s a world famous rock star.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAQbE66rR9E&hl=en_US&fs=1&]

In the ’90s Mick Jagger starred in the dreadful science fiction film Freejack (Geoff Murphy; 1992) that I’m still trying to forget. Thankfully he followed that failure with a memorable appearance in the critically acclaimed WW2 drama Bent (Sean Mathias; 1997) where he played a cabaret performer who dresses in drag. The part was a smart return to Jagger’s roots as an androgynous entertainer. In the following clip Jagger sings the mournful ballad “Streets of Berlin” that was written for the film by composer Philip Glass along with lyricist Martin Sherman.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrBYfAtEAps&hl=en_US&fs=1&]

In the last decade Mick Jagger has made brief appearances in a handful of interesting films including another WW2 drama called Enigma (Michael Apted; 2001) that he also helped produce. Enigma tells the story of a smart British code breaker who is trying to crack the Enigma Code used by the Nazi’s to commandeer their fleet of U-boats. During the making of the film Mick Jagger actually lent an original Enigma encoding machine to the crew that he privately owned in an effort to insure the historical accuracy of the movie. His next big role would be in the critically acclaimed drama The Man from Elysian Fields (George Hickenlooper; 2001) where Jagger played Luther Fox, the owner of an escort service that specializes in entertaining wealthy women. One of my favorite moments in the film is the following exchange between one of his clients (Anjelica Huston) whom he’s grown fond of. Unfortunately she doesn’t feel the same way. Mick Jagger was almost 60 years old when he made The Man from Elysian Fields and his age-worn face contains a real sadness that is apparent when he’s faced with rejection from a beautiful woman that he obviously cares for.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yq6EOBrbK3Q&hl=en_US&fs=1&]

The most recent movie that Mick Jagger appeared in was the entertaining heist film The Bank Job (Roger Donaldson; 2008). It’s one of my favorite films in recent years so I was happy to see Jagger make a brief and incredibly ironic appearance in the movie. The Bank Job is a creative throwback to earlier British crime movies and it takes place in London during 1971. In the film Mick Jagger has an unaccredited role as an employee of the bank that the criminals plan to rob. His appearance is so brief that you’ll miss him if you blink, but it’s interesting to note that before Jagger committed himself to The Rolling Stones he was a promising student at the London School of Economics. He could have easily ended up working in a British bank if he hadn’t joined the band. In the alternative world of The Bank Job, Mick Jagger’s sudden appearance seems to hint at that possibility. It’s a funny little moment that makes you take pause and appreciate the route that Jagger’s life did take. I’m sure he would have been a wonderful banker but I’m extremely grateful that he decided to pursue a career in music instead. Mick Jagger’s acting will never be as celebrated as his musical achievements with The Rolling Stones but he’s a talented performer and I’ve enjoyed following his career wherever it happened to take him.

78 Responses The Many Roles of Mick Jagger
Posted By saraeg : June 10, 2010 10:49 pm

dear kimberley, i immensely enjoyed seeing all the clips you provided for us showing mick jagger in his movie roles. i saw ‘performance’ when it originally showed in the movies back in 1970. i was eighteen and very much into the drug culture and rock and roll and was drawn into the movie because of sir mick on the big screen were i could get a close look at all of his raunch and sexiness. i had many times (recently) asked TCM in its ‘suggestion’ box to please play ‘performance’ as i had not seen it for many years and lo and behold ‘performance’ was shown (has been shown) a couple of times in the last few months because of restoration and its 40th anniversary. but i am still confused with understanding the ending. is it sir mick that is being driven away in the limo or is it the gangster that wanted to emulate him? yes, we see the gunshot go into the brain and sir mick in the closet covered in blood, but who is it really?

Posted By saraeg : June 10, 2010 10:49 pm

dear kimberley, i immensely enjoyed seeing all the clips you provided for us showing mick jagger in his movie roles. i saw ‘performance’ when it originally showed in the movies back in 1970. i was eighteen and very much into the drug culture and rock and roll and was drawn into the movie because of sir mick on the big screen were i could get a close look at all of his raunch and sexiness. i had many times (recently) asked TCM in its ‘suggestion’ box to please play ‘performance’ as i had not seen it for many years and lo and behold ‘performance’ was shown (has been shown) a couple of times in the last few months because of restoration and its 40th anniversary. but i am still confused with understanding the ending. is it sir mick that is being driven away in the limo or is it the gangster that wanted to emulate him? yes, we see the gunshot go into the brain and sir mick in the closet covered in blood, but who is it really?

Posted By wilbur twinhorse : June 10, 2010 11:04 pm

Nice One Kim, I haven’t commented on your other posts but I did read and enjoy your writing. This caught my eye, as in “eye” magazine which came out in the late ’60′s. That was when I first read about PERFORMANCE and it told me that it was a strange film and one that might hit you harder then you would think. The reviewer took some mind altering substance and proceeded to be freaked out-sign o’the times, eh? I enjoyed it when I first saw it in the early 70′s as well as Nicolas Roeg’s DON’T LOOK NOW. I watched performance the other month (thanks TCM) and it was great, but I really liked the young girl who was helping her Mom clean up the Rock Star’s Pad. Wonder how she is now? Probably a little less well off than Mick!!

Posted By wilbur twinhorse : June 10, 2010 11:04 pm

Nice One Kim, I haven’t commented on your other posts but I did read and enjoy your writing. This caught my eye, as in “eye” magazine which came out in the late ’60′s. That was when I first read about PERFORMANCE and it told me that it was a strange film and one that might hit you harder then you would think. The reviewer took some mind altering substance and proceeded to be freaked out-sign o’the times, eh? I enjoyed it when I first saw it in the early 70′s as well as Nicolas Roeg’s DON’T LOOK NOW. I watched performance the other month (thanks TCM) and it was great, but I really liked the young girl who was helping her Mom clean up the Rock Star’s Pad. Wonder how she is now? Probably a little less well off than Mick!!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 10, 2010 11:10 pm

I’m glad you liked the clips, Saraeg. I highly recommend reading Mike Brown’s book about Performance if you want to know more about the movie. It offers a lot of insight into the themes of the film. The ending is rather complex and suggests a merging of the two male leads. Chas (James Fox) kills Turner (Mick Jagger) and in turn “frees” him but as Chas heads towards his own death he adopts Turner’s persona as part of his own identity. The film suggests something other than death for both of them but it’s also open to interpretation. Viewers are allowed to project their own conclusions and ideas into the movie. The Nietzschean quote used in the film: “Nothing is true, everything is permitted” can be applied to the entire film and the way it was constructed. Hope that helps a little!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 10, 2010 11:10 pm

I’m glad you liked the clips, Saraeg. I highly recommend reading Mike Brown’s book about Performance if you want to know more about the movie. It offers a lot of insight into the themes of the film. The ending is rather complex and suggests a merging of the two male leads. Chas (James Fox) kills Turner (Mick Jagger) and in turn “frees” him but as Chas heads towards his own death he adopts Turner’s persona as part of his own identity. The film suggests something other than death for both of them but it’s also open to interpretation. Viewers are allowed to project their own conclusions and ideas into the movie. The Nietzschean quote used in the film: “Nothing is true, everything is permitted” can be applied to the entire film and the way it was constructed. Hope that helps a little!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 10, 2010 11:40 pm

Thank you Wilbur! Don’t Look Now is another amazing movie that I also love a lot. The little girl in Performance was named Laraine Wickens. Apparently she knew Donald Cammell and he asked her to be the movie but she didn’t appear in any more films. I’m not sure whatever happened to her but hopefully she’s doing well. Who knows? Maybe she’s changed her name and she’s a famous artist or writer that nobody knows about. It would be interesting if she suddenly resurfaced. I’m sure she’d have some great stories to tell!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 10, 2010 11:40 pm

Thank you Wilbur! Don’t Look Now is another amazing movie that I also love a lot. The little girl in Performance was named Laraine Wickens. Apparently she knew Donald Cammell and he asked her to be the movie but she didn’t appear in any more films. I’m not sure whatever happened to her but hopefully she’s doing well. Who knows? Maybe she’s changed her name and she’s a famous artist or writer that nobody knows about. It would be interesting if she suddenly resurfaced. I’m sure she’d have some great stories to tell!

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : June 11, 2010 12:19 am

The reason why Jagger and Robards were replaced by Kinski has to do with disaster during the production, virtually causing Herzog to start over again. There’s a documentary on the making of “Fitzcarraldo” which has some of the original footage. Neither Jagger nor Robards could stay in the jungle for an open ended schedule

Posted By Peter Nellhaus : June 11, 2010 12:19 am

The reason why Jagger and Robards were replaced by Kinski has to do with disaster during the production, virtually causing Herzog to start over again. There’s a documentary on the making of “Fitzcarraldo” which has some of the original footage. Neither Jagger nor Robards could stay in the jungle for an open ended schedule

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 11, 2010 12:48 am

I was aware that there were problems on the set of Fitzcarraldo and Robards became very ill. I’ve also seen Burden of Dreams (the Fitzcarraldo documentary) but isn’t it also true that Jagger’s part was written out of the film as I mentioned above? I know there was scheduling conflicts but according to a few Jagger biographies he was disappointed that Herzog decided to remove his character altogether once shooting started again.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 11, 2010 12:48 am

I was aware that there were problems on the set of Fitzcarraldo and Robards became very ill. I’ve also seen Burden of Dreams (the Fitzcarraldo documentary) but isn’t it also true that Jagger’s part was written out of the film as I mentioned above? I know there was scheduling conflicts but according to a few Jagger biographies he was disappointed that Herzog decided to remove his character altogether once shooting started again.

Posted By blinkypalermoo : June 11, 2010 9:10 am

The reason he wrote Jagger’s character out was because he felt only Jagger was capable of playing it and I think he wrote it specifically for him. I’m reciting from memory there though so could be wrong. He had high praise for him.

Posted By blinkypalermoo : June 11, 2010 9:10 am

The reason he wrote Jagger’s character out was because he felt only Jagger was capable of playing it and I think he wrote it specifically for him. I’m reciting from memory there though so could be wrong. He had high praise for him.

Posted By Raul : June 11, 2010 9:40 am

I happen to like Freejack…a lot better than I thought it would be and I think he did pretty well in it.

http://www.wutevs.wordpress.com

Posted By Raul : June 11, 2010 9:40 am

I happen to like Freejack…a lot better than I thought it would be and I think he did pretty well in it.

http://www.wutevs.wordpress.com

Posted By sannekurz : June 11, 2010 12:52 pm

Herzog speaks about the involvement of Jagger in his diaries, that he wrote during making of Fitzcarraldo…The book is called “Die Eroberung de Nutzlosen” (Conquering the Useless) – and this reminds me, I should write about it, the book is simply amazing…published in English and in original German Version it was one of the few times in my life I was intensely happy to be a native German speaker :)

Posted By sannekurz : June 11, 2010 12:52 pm

Herzog speaks about the involvement of Jagger in his diaries, that he wrote during making of Fitzcarraldo…The book is called “Die Eroberung de Nutzlosen” (Conquering the Useless) – and this reminds me, I should write about it, the book is simply amazing…published in English and in original German Version it was one of the few times in my life I was intensely happy to be a native German speaker :)

Posted By Conquering the Useless « sanne kurz – cinematography : June 11, 2010 1:20 pm

[...] watched on a lovely blog snippets of all roles Mick Jagger ever played…it reminded me Fitzcarraldo, Werner Herzog and [...]

Posted By Conquering the Useless « sanne kurz – cinematography : June 11, 2010 1:20 pm

[...] watched on a lovely blog snippets of all roles Mick Jagger ever played…it reminded me Fitzcarraldo, Werner Herzog and [...]

Posted By Mick Jagger’s movie career: A most uneven achievement « Jitterbugging for Jesus : June 11, 2010 1:26 pm

[...] fanatic you’ve got to check out Kimberly Lindbergs’ essay about ol’ Big Lips at Moviemorlocks.com, a TMC (Turner Classic Movies) blog site. Kimberly’s engaging piece is mostly about Mick’s obscure movie career but lots [...]

Posted By Mick Jagger’s movie career: A most uneven achievement « Jitterbugging for Jesus : June 11, 2010 1:26 pm

[...] fanatic you’ve got to check out Kimberly Lindbergs’ essay about ol’ Big Lips at Moviemorlocks.com, a TMC (Turner Classic Movies) blog site. Kimberly’s engaging piece is mostly about Mick’s obscure movie career but lots [...]

Posted By jamesblogofmedia : June 11, 2010 1:52 pm

wish you could find the clip of Jaggers’ song in ‘Performance’. Great blog none the less though, really enjoyed reading about jagger films which i haven’t seen yet. But now will! :D

Anyone interested, please read my blog which also focuses on issues of film and the media: http://jamesblogofmedia.wordpress.com/

Cheers

James :D

Posted By jamesblogofmedia : June 11, 2010 1:52 pm

wish you could find the clip of Jaggers’ song in ‘Performance’. Great blog none the less though, really enjoyed reading about jagger films which i haven’t seen yet. But now will! :D

Anyone interested, please read my blog which also focuses on issues of film and the media: http://jamesblogofmedia.wordpress.com/

Cheers

James :D

Posted By Friday LinkFrogging – 6/11/10 « : June 11, 2010 1:56 pm

[...] A completely unnecessary but very well executed Mick Jagger filmography. [...]

Posted By Friday LinkFrogging – 6/11/10 « : June 11, 2010 1:56 pm

[...] A completely unnecessary but very well executed Mick Jagger filmography. [...]

Posted By Vodka and Ground Beef : June 11, 2010 4:30 pm

I once ran into Mick Jagger in a cellar bar in Prague. He said he’d buy me a singapore sling, but when the check came, he bailed. Figures. I couldn’t even understand a word he was saying anyhow.

Posted By Vodka and Ground Beef : June 11, 2010 4:30 pm

I once ran into Mick Jagger in a cellar bar in Prague. He said he’d buy me a singapore sling, but when the check came, he bailed. Figures. I couldn’t even understand a word he was saying anyhow.

Posted By Mick Jagger Career in Banking | Music Facts : June 11, 2010 4:34 pm

[...] TCM’s Classic Movie Blog. This entry was posted in Trivia. Bookmark the permalink. ← Global [...]

Posted By Mick Jagger Career in Banking | Music Facts : June 11, 2010 4:34 pm

[...] TCM’s Classic Movie Blog. This entry was posted in Trivia. Bookmark the permalink. ← Global [...]

Posted By chicostein : June 11, 2010 4:45 pm

Amazing how his appearance on ‘Bank Job’ can be so brief and so meaningful at the same time. I wonder who had this idea.

Posted By chicostein : June 11, 2010 4:45 pm

Amazing how his appearance on ‘Bank Job’ can be so brief and so meaningful at the same time. I wonder who had this idea.

Posted By Eric : June 11, 2010 5:03 pm

LUV the Stones, luv Mick and his many roles over the years. Great read.

Here’s my take on one of their best songs, Loving Cup if you are interested, I’d love to hear about your fave Stones songs.
http://blog.ericmerten.com/2010/05/19/rs_l/

Posted By Eric : June 11, 2010 5:03 pm

LUV the Stones, luv Mick and his many roles over the years. Great read.

Here’s my take on one of their best songs, Loving Cup if you are interested, I’d love to hear about your fave Stones songs.
http://blog.ericmerten.com/2010/05/19/rs_l/

Posted By Songbird : June 11, 2010 5:19 pm

“In the film Mick Jagger plays Turner, a washed-up, drug-fueled and sexually uninhibited rock star…”
So he played himself now did he?…lol.. in all fairness I had no idea he had made so many films… and boy was he sexy…

Posted By Songbird : June 11, 2010 5:19 pm

“In the film Mick Jagger plays Turner, a washed-up, drug-fueled and sexually uninhibited rock star…”
So he played himself now did he?…lol.. in all fairness I had no idea he had made so many films… and boy was he sexy…

Posted By marcys : June 11, 2010 9:57 pm

There are two kinds of women in the world: those that hate Mick Jagger, and those who love him. Glad to hear from another of my kind! Nice retrospective.

Posted By marcys : June 11, 2010 9:57 pm

There are two kinds of women in the world: those that hate Mick Jagger, and those who love him. Glad to hear from another of my kind! Nice retrospective.

Posted By myauthenticity : June 11, 2010 10:14 pm

probably the most pointless blog ive read today…and probably the best!

Posted By myauthenticity : June 11, 2010 10:14 pm

probably the most pointless blog ive read today…and probably the best!

Posted By The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) « Brownposts : June 11, 2010 11:21 pm

[...] “The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness." Performance (1970) If someone asked me the proverbial question: "The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" I'd pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock 'n' roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band's American Tour in '81. And one of the … Read More [...]

Posted By The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) « Brownposts : June 11, 2010 11:21 pm

[...] “The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness." Performance (1970) If someone asked me the proverbial question: "The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" I'd pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock 'n' roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band's American Tour in '81. And one of the … Read More [...]

Posted By Fred : June 12, 2010 12:04 am

I haven’t seen Enigma, but about 25 years ago I saw a Broadway play based on the same historical event called Breaking the Code. It starred Derek Jacobi as Alan Turing, the genius who broke the Enigma code and would go on to be the father of the computer. Turing was also a gay man who refused to stay in the closet, which also broke the code of Great Britain during that era. Michael Gough and Jenny Agutter were also in the cast. Did Enigma also go into Turing’s private life and how it adversely affected his career?

Posted By Fred : June 12, 2010 12:04 am

I haven’t seen Enigma, but about 25 years ago I saw a Broadway play based on the same historical event called Breaking the Code. It starred Derek Jacobi as Alan Turing, the genius who broke the Enigma code and would go on to be the father of the computer. Turing was also a gay man who refused to stay in the closet, which also broke the code of Great Britain during that era. Michael Gough and Jenny Agutter were also in the cast. Did Enigma also go into Turing’s private life and how it adversely affected his career?

Posted By barrymanana : June 12, 2010 4:51 am

Although both enigmatic and watchable, Jagger never really has got his acting chops together, other than playing skewed versions of himself. David Bowie just scrapes through with Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence though.

Posted By barrymanana : June 12, 2010 4:51 am

Although both enigmatic and watchable, Jagger never really has got his acting chops together, other than playing skewed versions of himself. David Bowie just scrapes through with Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence though.

Posted By moeycat : June 12, 2010 8:52 am

fun to read. I’d choose the stones over beatles any day.
hmm, and I must watch those movies…

Posted By moeycat : June 12, 2010 8:52 am

fun to read. I’d choose the stones over beatles any day.
hmm, and I must watch those movies…

Posted By costala : June 12, 2010 4:17 pm

Went to Altamont Pass Speedway concert in 1969. 1st time to see the Stones. I don’t believe I ever bought one of their albums. My husband did and he is an avid fan. I always liked the Beatles more but never really bought many of their albums either. Of course, the white album, Abbey Road and Sgt Pepper. Maybe one or two others. Never any early stuff. My husband has Sticky Fingers and a few other Stone albums. Also, saw Voodoo Lounge in 1994 in Oakland. Bought a cool black long sleeve hooded shirt with the infamous tongue done in purple with spikes on it. I so love the Stones in the past 20 years more than the early years. Mick has a really sexy/nasty thing about him that I just have loved more in my older age than younger age. Being from the Bay Area, going to the Fillmore and Winterland to see all the groups passing by in the late 60′s and early 70′s was a blast. I was a big Spirit fan. Randy California and Cassidy playing those two drums sets was fantastic.
Stones forever, or until they die!

Posted By costala : June 12, 2010 4:17 pm

Went to Altamont Pass Speedway concert in 1969. 1st time to see the Stones. I don’t believe I ever bought one of their albums. My husband did and he is an avid fan. I always liked the Beatles more but never really bought many of their albums either. Of course, the white album, Abbey Road and Sgt Pepper. Maybe one or two others. Never any early stuff. My husband has Sticky Fingers and a few other Stone albums. Also, saw Voodoo Lounge in 1994 in Oakland. Bought a cool black long sleeve hooded shirt with the infamous tongue done in purple with spikes on it. I so love the Stones in the past 20 years more than the early years. Mick has a really sexy/nasty thing about him that I just have loved more in my older age than younger age. Being from the Bay Area, going to the Fillmore and Winterland to see all the groups passing by in the late 60′s and early 70′s was a blast. I was a big Spirit fan. Randy California and Cassidy playing those two drums sets was fantastic.
Stones forever, or until they die!

Posted By ofsoundandfury8 : June 12, 2010 8:21 pm

I have to send you a photo of me and a poster of the Stones straight above my bed, so I can see them right when I wake up.

Posted By ofsoundandfury8 : June 12, 2010 8:21 pm

I have to send you a photo of me and a poster of the Stones straight above my bed, so I can see them right when I wake up.

Posted By perrynoidradio : June 13, 2010 2:03 am

tonight i posted an audio interview i conducted with mick jaggers assistant. http://www.perrynoid.com

Posted By perrynoidradio : June 13, 2010 2:03 am

tonight i posted an audio interview i conducted with mick jaggers assistant. http://www.perrynoid.com

Posted By Joe Montana jersey : June 13, 2010 4:05 am

When I took pains in studying science, maths and other subjects in the school, Mick Jagger became a famous super star.

Posted By Joe Montana jersey : June 13, 2010 4:05 am

When I took pains in studying science, maths and other subjects in the school, Mick Jagger became a famous super star.

Posted By The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) « Chris Clayton on Wordpress : June 13, 2010 5:17 am

[...] The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) “The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness." Performance (1970) If someone asked me the proverbial question: "The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" I'd pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock 'n' roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band's American Tour in '81. And one of the … Read More [...]

Posted By The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) « Chris Clayton on Wordpress : June 13, 2010 5:17 am

[...] The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) “The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness." Performance (1970) If someone asked me the proverbial question: "The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" I'd pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock 'n' roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band's American Tour in '81. And one of the … Read More [...]

Posted By charcasmic : June 13, 2010 6:59 am

This post is really refreshing — in a musical sense! Suprising that it comes from a woman’s perspective!

Posted By charcasmic : June 13, 2010 6:59 am

This post is really refreshing — in a musical sense! Suprising that it comes from a woman’s perspective!

Posted By David Ehrenstein : June 13, 2010 9:42 am

I met Donald Cammell once, as he was handling the press screenings for his marvelous 1986 thriller “White of the Eye.” Quite a nice man in person, quite a brilliant and troubled one elsewise.

Posted By David Ehrenstein : June 13, 2010 9:42 am

I met Donald Cammell once, as he was handling the press screenings for his marvelous 1986 thriller “White of the Eye.” Quite a nice man in person, quite a brilliant and troubled one elsewise.

Posted By The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) « Anything & Everything : June 13, 2010 11:05 am

[...] The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) June 13, 2010 maczoos Leave a comment Go to comments “The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness." Performance (1970) If someone asked me the proverbial question: "The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" I'd pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock 'n' roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band's American Tour in '81. And one of the … Read More [...]

Posted By The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) « Anything & Everything : June 13, 2010 11:05 am

[...] The Many Roles of Mick Jagger (via TCM’s Classic Movie Blog) June 13, 2010 maczoos Leave a comment Go to comments “The only performance that makes it…that really makes it…that makes it all the way…is the one that achieves madness." Performance (1970) If someone asked me the proverbial question: "The Beatles or The Rolling Stones?" I'd pledge my allegiance to the bad boys of rock 'n' roll in an instant. The first concert I ever attended was a Rolling Stones show at Candlestick Park in San Francisco during the band's American Tour in '81. And one of the … Read More [...]

Posted By Arnold : June 13, 2010 4:38 pm

Mick, is an amazing artist and his longevity is incredible.I think it’s the passion in what he does that sets him apart. God Bless!

Posted By Arnold : June 13, 2010 4:38 pm

Mick, is an amazing artist and his longevity is incredible.I think it’s the passion in what he does that sets him apart. God Bless!

Posted By cloverspace electronic cigarettes : June 13, 2010 6:29 pm

Old Mick was much more than a rockstar I guess. Taking things from all directions removing them from everywhere. Mick.

Posted By cloverspace electronic cigarettes : June 13, 2010 6:29 pm

Old Mick was much more than a rockstar I guess. Taking things from all directions removing them from everywhere. Mick.

Posted By Michael Eriksson : June 13, 2010 7:00 pm

As for the Beatles vs. the Stones: I have not been exposed to that much of the latters music, but when I have been exposed, I have almost invariably come to the conclusion that one-or-the-other cover version was better than the original. With the Beatles (with whom I am much better acquainted), it has been the other way around.

Posted By Michael Eriksson : June 13, 2010 7:00 pm

As for the Beatles vs. the Stones: I have not been exposed to that much of the latters music, but when I have been exposed, I have almost invariably come to the conclusion that one-or-the-other cover version was better than the original. With the Beatles (with whom I am much better acquainted), it has been the other way around.

Posted By gingeritis : June 13, 2010 7:43 pm

God I love Mick Jagger…

Posted By gingeritis : June 13, 2010 7:43 pm

God I love Mick Jagger…

Posted By Cool Bev : June 14, 2010 11:29 pm

The made-for-TV concert film “Rock and Roll Circus” has a great scene where Jagger interviews John Lennon, who he call Winston Legthigh. Very Rutles like.

Posted By Cool Bev : June 14, 2010 11:29 pm

The made-for-TV concert film “Rock and Roll Circus” has a great scene where Jagger interviews John Lennon, who he call Winston Legthigh. Very Rutles like.

Posted By Jenni : June 19, 2010 1:35 am

You forgot to mention Mick’s funny turn in ABC’s short-lived sitcom, Knights of Prosperity. Mick wasn’t on each episode, but it was a very funny show about a group of misfits who decide that the way to be happy is to get rich, and to get rich, they’ll rob Mick Jagger’s NYC apartment. Mick is shown on a “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” type tv show, that main character, played by Donal Logue, happens to watch, which causes him to hatch the kooky plan. Mick is hilarious as he gives a tour of his exotic apartment. I wish ABC hadn’t cancelled this show, it was very witty and well done, imho. Not as much a fan of the Stones as my husband is; like the Beatles better.

Posted By Jenni : June 19, 2010 1:35 am

You forgot to mention Mick’s funny turn in ABC’s short-lived sitcom, Knights of Prosperity. Mick wasn’t on each episode, but it was a very funny show about a group of misfits who decide that the way to be happy is to get rich, and to get rich, they’ll rob Mick Jagger’s NYC apartment. Mick is shown on a “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” type tv show, that main character, played by Donal Logue, happens to watch, which causes him to hatch the kooky plan. Mick is hilarious as he gives a tour of his exotic apartment. I wish ABC hadn’t cancelled this show, it was very witty and well done, imho. Not as much a fan of the Stones as my husband is; like the Beatles better.

Posted By TOM : June 25, 2010 2:45 pm

Great Blog site! I am a devotee of sci-fi, B-movies, foreign films, 50-60-70′s TV shows; current TV loves include “Breaking Bad.”
Will definitely keep tuning in. Thank you all for your expertise.

Posted By TOM : June 25, 2010 2:45 pm

Great Blog site! I am a devotee of sci-fi, B-movies, foreign films, 50-60-70′s TV shows; current TV loves include “Breaking Bad.”
Will definitely keep tuning in. Thank you all for your expertise.

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