Hank Worden: Ol’ Mose Knows

Hank Worden as Mose Harper, trying out his rocking chair in "The Searchers" (1956)

A few weeks ago, Jenni, a regular reader of this blog, asked if we could write more about character actors here. In an effort to satisfy her and my curiosity about one of those too often obscure figures, I’d like to offer this brief profile of an unforgettable actor whose name took me years to discover. He went by character names such as these on screen: Old Timer. Old Codger. Old Geezer. Old Coot. Old Miner. Old Con. Flophouse Bum. Sleepy Martin. Flunky. Barfly. Squint. Curly.  You get the picture. He seems to have been born old, and perhaps bald. He could also convincingly play some minor character with a menial occupation, if any.

Hank Worden (1901-1991), an actor who worked in the business of show from 1930 to 1991, often appeared very briefly–even without credit, in movies directed by Hollywood hacks, journeymen and the legendary likes of John Ford, Howard Hawks, Henry Hathaway and King Vidor. He also appeared in self-parodying dreck such as  Please Don’t Eat the Babies (1983), though he brought to even those unworthy vehicles a vague sweetness and strangeness that was simultaneously endearing and disturbing. The impression he made during his brief spotlight moments, in particular in his role as the addle-pated Mose Harper in Ford’s masterwork, The Searchers (1956),  place his best characterizations somewhere West of both Shakespeare’s Fools and the characters from Samuel Beckett’s absurdist Waiting for Godot. Almost all Hank‘s characters have a strange, off-kilter style as they react to the world in an often odd, demented fashion, apparently clinging to some shreds of an identity that appears to have been torn up by the roots long ago.

The real Hank Worden, who was born Norton Earl Worden in July 23, 1901 in Rolfe, Iowa, was an articulate man and college-educated individual at a time when that was a rarity. He grew up literally in the saddle on a Montana ranch, the son of a couple who met in the mining fields of Colorado, where his mother was a schoolmarm and his father was a miner turned engineer. Young Hank, (yes, he was a lad once), chose to be a cowboy after he failed to become a pilot in the Army. He found his way into rodeos and became a bucking bronco rider of some note in that competitive world. His comfort in the saddle and his hardy nature helped him ignore any pain he may have felt when he was thrown and fell badly from horses.  Twenty five years after his time with the rodeo shows, an x-ray would reveal that he’d been walking around with a broken neck for a quarter of a century.

By January, 1931, he began his association with legitimate show biz after reportedly being stranded in a wintry NYC following a lay-off from a traveling rodeo that had visited the Big Apple as the country slipped deeper into the Depression.  (Left to right) Jack Miller, Pete Schwartz, Slim Cavanaugh, Hank Worden, J.B. Hibbard, (seated) Tex Cooper, Peggy Hannah, costumed for the 1931 Theatre Guild Broadway production of Green Grow the LilacsHe was lucky enough to appear in the Theatre Guild production of Lynn Riggs’ Green Grow the Lilacs, a slight play about life on the plains with Franchot Tone as Curly and June Walker as Laurey in the leads, as well as a future star of Western swing, Woodward Ritter, later better known as Tex Ritter, who became a close friend of the already bald young Worden. Hank‘s role in that play, naturally enough, was listed in the cast credits as simply “A Cowboy”, according to Broadway records. (Twelve years later, the Riggs  piece was rewritten, scored anew and marked the breakthrough for a newly formed musical team, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who renamed it and had a bit of a hit in 1943. You may have heard of it. It was called Oklahoma! ). When the show closed after less than two months in March of 1931, the resilient Worden reportedly found employment as a chauffeur for multimillionaire Harvey Firestone (as in the tires), and later worked for some time as a NYC cabbie. (I wonder if passengers heard him say “Thank ya, thank ya kindly” when they gave their hack driver a tip?).

Eventually, the gentle Mr. Worden returned to the West, taking on stints as a trail hand in the Grand Canyon and as a ranch hand at a dude ranch, where he sang ditties such as “The Old Chisum Trail” for guests, with Hank‘s distinctive twang lending these tunes some extra zing.  This job led to his acquaintance with actress Billie Burke and her daughter. Billie BurkeThe widow of Florenz Ziegfeld turned Hollywood character actress, (who specialized in creating roles as well-bred society space cadets and good witches), took a shine to the ingratiating, down-to-earth Hank, recommending him to several Hollywood producers. By the mid-1930s, Worden was beginning to pile up many, many uncredited appearances in good and bad movies. The actor would cite the Gary Cooper movie, The Plainsman (1936), directed by Cecil B. DeMille, as his first appearance of note, though it was a bit of a thrill to spot HW in the crowd of lumberjacks in Howard Hawks’ Come and Get It (1936) last time I saw it.

Hank Worden‘s bread and butter roles came in a series of “B” movies, such as the twelve he appeared in with his friend Tex Ritter between 1937 and 1943, usually appearing as a slow-witted comic character. Sometimes reluctantly appearing in movies for a brief time under the name of Heber Snow, which some sources say was the inspiration of an enterprising producer who guessed that name might make him more popular with Mormon audiences, Hank Worden also acted in small budgeted but often entertaining oaters with Bob Baker, Buck Jones, Gene Autry, George O’Brien, Hopalong Cassidy, and Tim Holt. Hank Worden, (second from left) in a Bob Baker cowboy programmerThe journeyman actor would later describe his level in the movies this way in a documentary made by documentarian Clyde Lucas, called, appropriately enough: Thank Ya, Thank Ya Kindly (1991):

“The star would be the first character through the door in a given scene. Next would come the Ward Bonds and the Walter Brennans, actors who were character leads and often familiar to the audience by name. [Worden] would be the third man through the door.” That third man through the door might not be known by name to audience members, but his appearance was a welcome, even expected sight, lending texture, reality and color to the movie.

As an apparently guileless actor with his own particular style and no visible acting technique, Worden found his niche and a bit of immortality when he joined  what has come to be described as the “John Ford Stock Company”, consisting of many actors, including such notables as John Wayne, Ward Bond, John Qualen, Maureen O’Hara, J. Farrell McDonald, Jack Pennick, Harry Carey, (Sr. and Jr.), Jane Darwell, and Olive Carey. This career upturn began inauspiciously for Hank when he played an uncredited role as a Cavalryman in Stagecoach (1939). Stagecoach (1939)It would be nine years before Worden again stepped in front of a camera directed by Ford when he appeared in Fort Apache (1948), as a “Southern Recruit” in the first of the director’s “cavalry trilogy” films that explored the myths that destroy and nurture a community as the military characters adhere, sometimes reluctantly, to duty and honor in the director’s view of the expansionist West. Stagecoach also marked the beginning of a working relationship and an off-screen friendship between John Wayne and Hank Worden, who would eventually work together on 18 film and television projects.

John Wayne, whose decade of experience prior to Stagecoach had taught him what it was like to struggle to make a living in the poverty row  and smaller studio Westerns, took a liking to Worden. While Wayne reportedly had occasional difficulties remaining in character when working with the naturally funny Hank Worden, he immediately took the actor into his circle of working friends, perhaps helping to cast him in a tiny uncredited part in the Three Mesquiteers movie that Wayne made immediately after completing the Ford film, The Night Riders (1939). The Night Riders (1939)Not surprisingly, given his proven track record as a working professional in the movies by this time, Hank also married for the first and only time at age 38, when he wed Emma Louise Eaton the following year. The pair would be a couple for 37 years, until her death in 1977.

As a member of the “John Ford Stock Company”, one might have expected that Hank Worden would be subjected to the same hectoring treatment that Ford is said to have doled out to other regulars on his set, especially Ward Bond, a thick-skinned man described as innured to his director’s nearly constant criticism. Yet, as Dobe Carey points out in interviews, (Dobe, aka Harry Carey, Jr. and a recipient of some hellacious Ford treatment, particularly during his debut performance in Three Godfathers in 1948), it was Worden, who would contritely point out his own mistakes with dialogue or action before the director. Hank Worden in his prime in one more WesternPerhaps it was the character actor’s good nature, but it may have been that Ford understood that Hank was doing the best he could, and his performances would never improve with too much criticism. When Hank Worden asked periodically if he was doing what the director wanted, others observed a gentleness in John Ford, as he quietly encouraged the actor whenever he appeared on his films, occasionally with a wink and a smile toward an attentive John Wayne nearby, acknowledging that this gifted character actor’s instincts were not something that could be learned or necessarily refined. Seeing Worden in Ford‘s films is a fascinating thing. The strange line readings and sing-song delivery of his lines that sometimes seemed funny or amateurish in other films took on an interesting quality in his movies. In Ford‘s world, Hank‘s stilted speech patterns and faraway gaze, as well as his tall, lanky, almost alien awkwardness becomes compelling. Worden as the Lincolnesque Deacon Clump in "The Horse Soldiers"By the time Worden appears in The Horse Soldiers as the Deacon, playing a Southern man whose conscience has led him to aid the Underground Railroad, he becomes a Lincolnesque figure, physically and spiritually, leading the Union soldiers trapped behind enemy lines through a swamp and freedom.

One thing that may have protected the canny player as well as his “innocent talent” in Ford’s eyes, was his understanding of the pecking order on themovie sets he worked on very well. During Three Godfathers, the character actor observed some cutthroat games of dominoes between Ford, Wayne, Pedro Armendariz, and Ward Bond. According to Worden, when Ford was winning, all was well. “The rest of us”, he said, stood around and listened to them…Ford couldn’t stand to be topped, so he cheated.” Wisely, Worden kept out of those games.

Mose Harper looking at the Indian's graveOne of his most rewarding parts came in The Searchers (1956) when his character of Mose Harper, who in Alan LeMay’s source novel is an older, rational rancher with grown sons, is transformed into a comical seer whose understanding of the Indians and the haunted Ethan Edwards behavior is a key in this mythic story touching on the love, loss, racism, redemptive qualitities and memory within each of us. One example of Mose Harper’s peculiar insight comes when Ethan, (John Wayne) on the hunt for the Comanche raiding party who have decimated the Edwards and other families and stolen the one surviving Edwards child, Debbie, discovers a buried Indian.  Edwards and his companions desecrate the hastily concealed grave, removing the stone that covers the body, the cloth that shielded the face, and, after an impotently furious Brad Jorgensen (Dobe Carey) hurls a rock at the dead man, Ethan fires two bullets into the eyes of the corpse. Mose, who says nothing verbally, understands perfectly– in his own weird way–what the vengeful Ethan has accomplished, causing the soul of the dead man to wander between the winds without rest. Mose proves his bizarre credentials as a member of the initial search party looking for the Indian raiding party led by Ward Bond, as you can see here:

[wpvideo k240WlbF]

While Mose’s longing for a roof over his head and a rocking chair to nestle in is a memorable feature of this movie’s story, Hank Worden‘s loopy character, praying just before an Indian attack “That which we are about to receive, we thank thee, O Lord” becomes a shadow of Ethan Edwards, eventually (and almost inadvertently) leading the searchers to the Indian camp where Debbie and her uncle are reunited in a near tragic moment.  Hank Worden as Mose Harper, in full non sequitur, in "The Searchers"In my own loopier moments, I like to think an interesting film might have been made by an enterprising filmmaker focusing on the entire story from Mose Harper’s point of view.

Hank‘s close relationship to Ford and Wayne probably led to his being cast in one of the more significant roles that Worden played when he was asked to play crusty, valiant preacher in the sprawling John Wayne-directed The Alamo (1960). Hank later commented that he wished that Wayne had allowed their mentor John Ford to direct The Alamo since the character actor found that James Edward Grant‘s script was overly verbose. Worden believed that John Ford‘s remarkable instinct for storytelling via action on screen would have been superior to the long pages of dialogue that showed up each day of shooting in the rattlesnake laden area where the movie was filmed in Texas and Mexico. While Ford is said to have directed a few scenes in The Alamo, the star and official director, John Wayne, was generous to his coworkers in his effort to prove himself a consummate filmmaker, (rather than just a perennially underrated actor). Though it has sometimes been cut from prints of The Alamo, the following death scene for Hank’s character is one of the actor’s best moments on film:

[wpvideo btgy8Yqs]

Despite such showstoppers as the above death scene in the unwieldy epic production of The Alamo, a film that was given mixed reviews at best, over time as the critical status and popularity of The Searchers grew, the Mose Harper role would prove to be the highlight of Hank Worden‘s career. However,  his work with Howard Hawks in Red River (1948) and particularly as the highly amusing role of a simple-minded “PoorDevil” in the underrated and entertaining The Big Sky (1952).Hank Worden as "PoorDevil" in Hawks' "The Big Sky" (1952) Based on A.B. Guthrie’s history of the pathfinders who opened the frontiers of Kentucky and Tennessee to Western pioneers,  the actor’s weird versatility for portraying offbeat characters enabled him to bring a comic poignancy to this Native American character, even if the movie was a mixed bag that was at times hackneyed and at other moments quite truthful about the human cost of Westward expansion.

The Big Sky also gave Hank an opportunity to work with fellow character actor Arthur Hunnicutt, (who had one of his best roles in The Big Sky and who also shared the screen with Hank one other time, in the Randolph Scott Western, Sugarfoot in 1951). Though a decade younger than Hank, Hunnicutt would prove to be one of Worden‘s  closest friends.

Late in life, the elderly  Hank, seemingly acknowledging one of the downsides of longevity, expressed a wistful regret that he could no longer visit his pal Hunnicutt at the Motion Picture Home. Though he would outlive  his wife and many of his friends by well over 10 years, Mr. Worden remained active, continuing to appear in movies and episodic television, including Bonanza, Wagon Train, Gunsmoke and Knight Rider, as well as working with a new generation of filmmakers in innovative films such as the critically acclaimed Hammett (1982), directed by Wim Wenders, and Runaway Train (1985), directed by Andrei Konchalovsky.  He also worked with a newer star (and later director), Clint Eastwood, with whom he first worked on the tv program, Rawhide. When Eastwood moved on to star and later direct movies, he tapped Worden as a castmate in Any Which Way But Loose (1978) and Bronco Billy (1980).

Worden, who worked until very near his death at 90, appeared as the Bellboy (perhaps the world’s oldest) in David Lynch‘s surreally entertaining sojourn into episodic television, Twin Peaks. The ancient character actor, armed with his work ethic and sense of humor, managed to bring his patented strange courtliness to another generation of viewers and formed a bond with co-star Kyle MacLachlan–despite their 58 year age difference. 90 year old Hank Worden as the elderly waiter in tv's Twin Peaks. Still saying "Thank ya, Thank ya kindly:"

Many of the films touched on here can be seen on TCM regularly.  Hank Worden can be seen this Saturday, April 11th at 2:30 PM ET, when King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946) slithers into view on the network, with Hank in one of his uncredited roles as “Dance-Floor Cowboy”. Blink and you’ll miss him, dear readers, so look carefully for one more appearance by an intriguing actor.

Sources:
Davis, Ronald L., Duke: The Life and Image of John Wayne, University of Oklahoma Press, 2002
LeMay, Alan, The Searchers, Harper, 1954.
Filmography for Hank Worden at TCMDb
Saddle Pals and Sidekicks at The Old Corral, B-Westerns.com

38 Responses Hank Worden: Ol’ Mose Knows
Posted By Rick : April 9, 2009 12:30 am

I have always wondered what his name was as he always stood out in any movie he played. I would say it was his face, and the strange way that he delivered his lines. Thanks for the heads up.

I hope you can continue to bring more of these real character character actors(actresses) to the forefront.

Posted By Rick : April 9, 2009 12:30 am

I have always wondered what his name was as he always stood out in any movie he played. I would say it was his face, and the strange way that he delivered his lines. Thanks for the heads up.

I hope you can continue to bring more of these real character character actors(actresses) to the forefront.

Posted By MissGoddess : April 9, 2009 11:43 am

Hi Moira! Thank you for the terrific article spotlighting
the unique gifts of one of my pet favorites, good old Hank.
I love the “tang” he brings to the films he appeared in; they
would be a little blander without him.

Posted By MissGoddess : April 9, 2009 11:43 am

Hi Moira! Thank you for the terrific article spotlighting
the unique gifts of one of my pet favorites, good old Hank.
I love the “tang” he brings to the films he appeared in; they
would be a little blander without him.

Posted By moirafinnie : April 9, 2009 1:01 pm

Your comments are appreciated, Rick and Miss G.

I know that I was aware of that “weird guy” in the Duke’s movies from the time I was a tyke. When I eventually learned his name and more about his remarkably long career, I found myself looking for his face in numerous movies. It was a pleasure to look at the scope of time and genres that the man lent his weathered visage and rather gentle spirit to over the decades while researching this piece.

I’ll try to explore more of these unsung, colorful contributors to classic movies further in the future.

Posted By moirafinnie : April 9, 2009 1:01 pm

Your comments are appreciated, Rick and Miss G.

I know that I was aware of that “weird guy” in the Duke’s movies from the time I was a tyke. When I eventually learned his name and more about his remarkably long career, I found myself looking for his face in numerous movies. It was a pleasure to look at the scope of time and genres that the man lent his weathered visage and rather gentle spirit to over the decades while researching this piece.

I’ll try to explore more of these unsung, colorful contributors to classic movies further in the future.

Posted By Patricia : April 9, 2009 1:27 pm

Thank you so much for the background information on the charming Mr. Worden. It’s strange that I knew so little about someone who feels like family.

Posted By Patricia : April 9, 2009 1:27 pm

Thank you so much for the background information on the charming Mr. Worden. It’s strange that I knew so little about someone who feels like family.

Posted By Jenni : April 9, 2009 3:04 pm

Yeah, Moira!! An interesting read and it was good to find out more about Hank Worden. I think I recall him more in the Ford Calvary pics, but your writing about The Searchers, I can remember his character sitting in a rocking chair. He did have a sing-songy way of saying his lines-great description.

Posted By Jenni : April 9, 2009 3:04 pm

Yeah, Moira!! An interesting read and it was good to find out more about Hank Worden. I think I recall him more in the Ford Calvary pics, but your writing about The Searchers, I can remember his character sitting in a rocking chair. He did have a sing-songy way of saying his lines-great description.

Posted By suzidoll : April 10, 2009 1:47 am

What an interesting life Worden led. Sadly, we no longer live in an era where a life like that would be possible. Thanks for bringing attention to this colorful character actor.

Posted By suzidoll : April 10, 2009 1:47 am

What an interesting life Worden led. Sadly, we no longer live in an era where a life like that would be possible. Thanks for bringing attention to this colorful character actor.

Posted By Walter Watson : April 10, 2009 12:36 pm

Thanks so much for this little tribute. I came to love and recognize Hank W. as Mose in the Searchers. But I think my favorite role was in Fort Apache. The way his character is instantly propelled to a high status in the recruits. Due to his prowess as a natural horseman. It’s a rare moment to play a hero. Or is it? When you look at his roles. He often plays an almost insignificant hero. A key player, hidden behind a vale of quirk. I Love it!!!!

Posted By Walter Watson : April 10, 2009 12:36 pm

Thanks so much for this little tribute. I came to love and recognize Hank W. as Mose in the Searchers. But I think my favorite role was in Fort Apache. The way his character is instantly propelled to a high status in the recruits. Due to his prowess as a natural horseman. It’s a rare moment to play a hero. Or is it? When you look at his roles. He often plays an almost insignificant hero. A key player, hidden behind a vale of quirk. I Love it!!!!

Posted By Andrew : April 13, 2009 9:59 am

I never knew this character actor’s name until today–even though his presence brightened both good and bad movies over the years. Thanks so much for filling in the blanks on Hank Worden.

Posted By Andrew : April 13, 2009 9:59 am

I never knew this character actor’s name until today–even though his presence brightened both good and bad movies over the years. Thanks so much for filling in the blanks on Hank Worden.

Posted By Jack Q. : April 14, 2009 4:23 pm

When I was in high school in the mid 40s, I worked as an usher in the big theaters, but the usher life is another story. Ushers on a regular schedule would see a movie 14 times a week. That much exposure would get us deep into a movie by the end of the week. We had the stars’ performances covered, the supporters and the authenticity of the sets and details and all the things that that you see in credits that go into a movie. Some of our favorite parts were watching character actors show up again in another role, maybe smaller this time or bigger. In addition to actors like Worden, there were many others that caught our imagination. That ever-mean Nazi, Martin Koslek, and his oily WWII Japanese counterpart (I think he was Chinese), Richard Loo. With a smarmy smile “American dog, I was educated in your universities.” One of my favorites was most usually a very bad guy and often played in John Ford’s and other westerns. That was Tom Tyler who lost the off-screen duel with John Wayne’s Ringo Kid in Stagecoach and went down before Errol Flynn’s guns in (I think) WB’s “San Antonio” and Wayne’s again in “Red River”. When his role wasn’t that prominent, he was often one of Ford’s many cavalrymen or one of a bunch of cowboys. He did get his starring role in a serial. He played “The Phantom” and I didn’t miss an episode of the “ghost who walks”. That was before my ushering days as many of his movies came out before and after my ushering years. Great character actors “made” a lot of the films I’d see 14 times a week. If the quality of performance ran deep in a film, one didn’t tire of studying it. We knew lots of character actors for their schticks. Regis Toomey always died in his movies. Bob Steele was always a very mean guy. And so many others: Andy Devine, Chill Wills, Ben Johnson, Agnes Moorehead, Elisha Cook, Jr., Alan Hale. What would “On the Waterfront” have been without those character actors? What were they really like when they left work for the day? Who did they hang out with? I’d like TCM to run a series of movies based on character actors and their impact on movies. Thanks for a very nice article on Hank Worden. I haven’t spent time on TCM blogs, but I will.

Posted By Jack Q. : April 14, 2009 4:23 pm

When I was in high school in the mid 40s, I worked as an usher in the big theaters, but the usher life is another story. Ushers on a regular schedule would see a movie 14 times a week. That much exposure would get us deep into a movie by the end of the week. We had the stars’ performances covered, the supporters and the authenticity of the sets and details and all the things that that you see in credits that go into a movie. Some of our favorite parts were watching character actors show up again in another role, maybe smaller this time or bigger. In addition to actors like Worden, there were many others that caught our imagination. That ever-mean Nazi, Martin Koslek, and his oily WWII Japanese counterpart (I think he was Chinese), Richard Loo. With a smarmy smile “American dog, I was educated in your universities.” One of my favorites was most usually a very bad guy and often played in John Ford’s and other westerns. That was Tom Tyler who lost the off-screen duel with John Wayne’s Ringo Kid in Stagecoach and went down before Errol Flynn’s guns in (I think) WB’s “San Antonio” and Wayne’s again in “Red River”. When his role wasn’t that prominent, he was often one of Ford’s many cavalrymen or one of a bunch of cowboys. He did get his starring role in a serial. He played “The Phantom” and I didn’t miss an episode of the “ghost who walks”. That was before my ushering days as many of his movies came out before and after my ushering years. Great character actors “made” a lot of the films I’d see 14 times a week. If the quality of performance ran deep in a film, one didn’t tire of studying it. We knew lots of character actors for their schticks. Regis Toomey always died in his movies. Bob Steele was always a very mean guy. And so many others: Andy Devine, Chill Wills, Ben Johnson, Agnes Moorehead, Elisha Cook, Jr., Alan Hale. What would “On the Waterfront” have been without those character actors? What were they really like when they left work for the day? Who did they hang out with? I’d like TCM to run a series of movies based on character actors and their impact on movies. Thanks for a very nice article on Hank Worden. I haven’t spent time on TCM blogs, but I will.

Posted By Mark B. : April 16, 2009 12:52 pm

Great article about a memorable actor. Do you have any information on Jack Pennick, the ‘dog-faced’ actor in many John Ford movies? It’s become a hobby to try and spot him in other movies.

Posted By Mark B. : April 16, 2009 12:52 pm

Great article about a memorable actor. Do you have any information on Jack Pennick, the ‘dog-faced’ actor in many John Ford movies? It’s become a hobby to try and spot him in other movies.

Posted By Jim Beaver : August 10, 2009 4:33 pm

Thanks for this lovely piece on old Hank. He was one of my dearest friends and my roommate for several years when I was just starting out in Hollywood. A more generous, good-hearted man never existed, and I treasure not only his hundreds of film appearances but the memory of our time as friends. I thought I knew everything there was to know about Hank, but this piece had a couple of revelations even for me. Thank you.

Posted By Jim Beaver : August 10, 2009 4:33 pm

Thanks for this lovely piece on old Hank. He was one of my dearest friends and my roommate for several years when I was just starting out in Hollywood. A more generous, good-hearted man never existed, and I treasure not only his hundreds of film appearances but the memory of our time as friends. I thought I knew everything there was to know about Hank, but this piece had a couple of revelations even for me. Thank you.

Posted By donny h. : August 15, 2009 11:12 am

great piece i,ve enjoyed hanks work for years

Posted By donny h. : August 15, 2009 11:12 am

great piece i,ve enjoyed hanks work for years

Posted By Joe C. Copeland : November 30, 2009 10:15 pm

Loved your article on Hank Worden. I’ve known his name for many years but not the biography you printed. Another great character acter in John Wayne movies was Strother Martin. Any chance you can do a similar article on him?
Keep up the sensational work.

Posted By Joe C. Copeland : November 30, 2009 10:15 pm

Loved your article on Hank Worden. I’ve known his name for many years but not the biography you printed. Another great character acter in John Wayne movies was Strother Martin. Any chance you can do a similar article on him?
Keep up the sensational work.

Posted By Chris Evans : May 1, 2010 12:15 pm

Excellent, excellent article. I also liked Worden’s performance in the underrated John Ford film, ‘Wagon Master’. The characters that he played were very convincing.

It was interesting that Worden (though his last name was misspelled in the credits) was used by John Milius in his surfing epic ‘Big Wednesday’ as a link to the films of John Ford.

I hope you do further articles on wonderful character actors like Warren Oates, Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones, etc.

Thanks,
Chris

Posted By Chris Evans : May 1, 2010 12:15 pm

Excellent, excellent article. I also liked Worden’s performance in the underrated John Ford film, ‘Wagon Master’. The characters that he played were very convincing.

It was interesting that Worden (though his last name was misspelled in the credits) was used by John Milius in his surfing epic ‘Big Wednesday’ as a link to the films of John Ford.

I hope you do further articles on wonderful character actors like Warren Oates, Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones, etc.

Thanks,
Chris

Posted By Thomas Seaton : July 30, 2010 10:14 pm

Great!!! I never knew Hanks name until now. Thanks He was one the great unsung actors. Looking forward to more.

Posted By Thomas Seaton : July 30, 2010 10:14 pm

Great!!! I never knew Hanks name until now. Thanks He was one the great unsung actors. Looking forward to more.

Posted By raven becky smothers : January 12, 2012 6:52 pm

what race is hank? some movies he looks like a light skin black man others he looks white

Posted By raven becky smothers : January 12, 2012 6:52 pm

what race is hank? some movies he looks like a light skin black man others he looks white

Posted By Jim Beaver : January 13, 2012 4:21 am

Hank was Caucasian. His family was English on both sides.

Posted By Jim Beaver : January 13, 2012 4:21 am

Hank was Caucasian. His family was English on both sides.

Posted By Jimmie Gatlin : June 9, 2013 5:48 pm

I always enjoyed Hank Worden’s small roles as he could make them stand out as nobody else could. It took me many years to find out his real name. He was one of the best character actors I’ve ever seen. Right up there with Walter Brennan, Strother Martin, Andy Devine and many of the other greats who labored behind the “Stars”. It was a joy to read his biography. (Thank Ya Kindley)

Posted By Jimmie Gatlin : June 9, 2013 5:48 pm

I always enjoyed Hank Worden’s small roles as he could make them stand out as nobody else could. It took me many years to find out his real name. He was one of the best character actors I’ve ever seen. Right up there with Walter Brennan, Strother Martin, Andy Devine and many of the other greats who labored behind the “Stars”. It was a joy to read his biography. (Thank Ya Kindley)

Posted By moirafinnie : June 9, 2013 9:14 pm

Thanks for sharing your reaction here, Jimmie. Hank is always a hoot to spot in any part. He always seems real and likable (even when he plays a slightly “off kilter” character).
Cheers,
Moira

Posted By moirafinnie : June 9, 2013 9:14 pm

Thanks for sharing your reaction here, Jimmie. Hank is always a hoot to spot in any part. He always seems real and likable (even when he plays a slightly “off kilter” character).
Cheers,
Moira

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