Thoughts on a Powerful Actress in Her Best Role

wantliveIn the hype and hoopla surrounding the Golden Globes, much was made of Meryl Streep’s record of award nominations and wins. Nominated for Mamma Mia this year, Streep habitually earns award nods for almost every role she takes on. The nominations alone are enough to designate her as our era’s most respected actress, and fans like to speculate on her best role. But, during the 1950s, Susan Hayward would have given Streep a run for her money.  And, in my opinion, her best film is I Want to Live

 Hayward specialized in melodramas and biopics, which gave her ample opportunity to exhibit her talent for playing spirited characters kicked down by life’s circumstances.  The roles were showy, and her characters were expressive and emotional, making her a favorite of female movie fans. Between 1948 and 1959, Hayward received five Best Actress Academy Award nominations, winning once. In addition, she won a Best Actress award at Cannes, two Golden Globes, and was twice nominated for a British Academy Award.

 Hayward is  best remembered  for roles based on real-life women forced to face life’s hardships or cruelties, including With a Song in My Heart, a biopic of singer Jane Froman, I’ll Cry Tomorrow, a biopic of actress Lillian Roth, and I’d Climb the Highest Mountain, a drama about a real-life minister’s wife. Sadly, melodramas, with their artifice, exaggerated emotions, large-scale orchestrated scores, and female-oriented storylines, are out of favor in our contemporary era. This has nothing to do with Hayward’s excellent performances, but several of these films seem old-fashioned in their mise-en-scene,  storylines, and direction. The exception is her Oscar-winning role in I Want to Live, in which she played convicted murderess Barbara Graham, who was executed in the gas chamber in 1955 for her part in killing an old lady for money.  TCM is showing I Want to Live in the afternoon of January 27; if you have never seen this film, I can’t recommend it enough. It is surprisingly modern in its style and its unsentimental approach to the story.

SUSAN HAYWARD AS BLOODY BABS GRAHAM.

SUSAN HAYWARD AS BLOODY BABS GRAHAM.

 Hayward gives an astonishing performance as an unsympathetic woman. Graham was a party girl from the wrong side of the tracks who had been in trouble with the law since adolescence.  With no education, sense of purpose, or decent family life, she could not escape the sordid world she had been born into. Graham married four times and had a couple of kids; she drifted in and out of prostitution; and she dabbled in drugs. She had complete disdain for mainstream social institutions, such as the law, the judicial system, social mores and propriety, and the media. But who can blame her; these institutions mostly worked against her rather than for her.   

Written by Nelson Gidding and Don Mankiewicz and directed by the versatile Robert Wise, I Want to Live offers an unflinching, unsentimental chronicle of Graham’s lifestyle and milieu. While the viewer understands the connection between crime, poverty, and lack of opportunity while watching the film, the movie does not excuse her bad choices or immoral behavior.  During the course of events, she is arrested for solicitation, she offers known criminals alibis to keep them out of trouble, and she shills for a gambling joint by luring in unsuspecting dupes to get fleeced.  Her choices are not accidents, and she knows the consequences of what she is doing. When the police come to arrest her for murder at the warehouse hideout where she is found with the other suspects, they use a bullhorn to force her out with her hands up. She walks out onto the street where the police and a barrage of reporters are waiting for her, and she defiantly thrusts her hips at them in a lewd gesture. Barbara Graham is definitely NOT the hooker with a heart of gold.

HAYWARD AS GRAHAM THRUSTS HER HIPS AT THE POLICE IN A DEFIANT GESTURE.

HAYWARD AS GRAHAM THRUSTS HER HIPS AT THE POLICE IN A DEFIANT GESTURE.

Though the depiction of Graham is not sugar-coated, we become increasingly sympathetic toward her. The film takes an ambiguous position on her guilt, beginning with her arrest and continuing through the trial .Graham claims she did not take part in the murder, but she has no credible alibi. While in jail, she is set up by authorities when they plant an undercover cop inside, who offers her an alibi in exchange for money. Graham accepts the offer only to find out that she was duped, making her look even more guilty. The film clearly depicts this set back as a set-up. The lack of compassion for Graham and women like her by various representatives of social institutions — cops, reporters, lawyers — is shown many times in the film, suggesting that the system works against disenfranchised women who are alienated from a “normal family life.”  When a newspaper reporter, who had previously assumed she was guilty because of her sleazy lifestyle, changes his mind about her, we take her side as well. But his efforts on her behalf do not help her case, and she is convicted of murder.

 We have sympathy for Graham for other reasons as well, based on standard filmmaking conventions. We identify with her partly because she is the central character and events unfold from her point of view, and partly because she is played by a charismatic and beautiful film star, Susan Hayward. Those two characteristics always force some sense of identification from the film viewer, even for the most hideous of central characters. 

However, Robert Wise’s skillful direction also puts us on Barbara’s side in more subtle ways. He uses a great deal of close-ups in the film, which depict Hayward’s expressive face or the faces of other characters. Close-ups reveal a character’s inner feelings or true self, even if he or she is putting up a front for the rest of the world.  In addition, the closer we are to a character physically, the more emotionally involved we are with them. Close-ups of Hayward engender sympathy for the character of Graham.

wantlive6

CLOSE-UPS OF HAYWARD HELP US SYMPATHIZE WITH HER

 wantlive5

Wise makes excellent use of a close-up at the end of the film to suggest the real reason behind her conviction. After all of Barbara’s stays of executions are over, reporter Ed Montgomery — based on the real-life reporter who wrote articles on Graham’s behalf — sits dejected in a room waiting for the inevitable. A prison guard says, “Well, what was she doing shacked up with them in the first place.” A close-up on Montgomery’s face reveals that he realizes that Graham is being  convicted and punished for her sordid lifestyle, not the crime. And, given his original opinion of her, Montgomery recognizes his initial attitude in the guard’s cold-blooded statement. The fact that this statement is made as Graham is being gassed underscores that her execution is morally wrong. And, it’s a simple close-up that brings all of this home.

 Wise’s background as a director at RKO, where he edited Citizen Kane and The Magnificent Andersons and directed some of the Val Lewton films, served him well for understanding the signifying power of a camera angle and the expressive nature of lighting in a black-and-white film. I Want to Live opens in a seedy jazz club with good music but a bad crowd. Depicted in a selection of dutch angles (canted angles), which typically suggest that something is wrong with a character, locale, or situation, the jazz club is not a place where good women and honorable men pass the time. It is an aberrant milieu that is far removed from a normal middle-class life. And, it is Barbara Graham’s milieu.

 Later, when in jail, Barbara writes to a prominent psychiatrist who may help her avoid the gas chamber. She writes that he is her greatest hope. At that point the lights go out for the night, leaving her in the dark. The lighting is so low key that you can hardly see her, suggesting that the lights have gone out in more ways than one. In the next scene, we learn that the psychiatrist has died, and so has her hopes. These scenes showcase film as a visual medium; plot points, character development, and themes are often reinforced through visual techniques.  The classic Hollywood style can be an amazing storytelling tool in the hands of a good filmmaker like Robert Wise;  there is simply no equal to it.

wantlive8

HIGH-CONTRAST LIGHTING HEIGHTENS THE DRAMA.

A title card at the beginning of the film explains that I Want to Live is based on the letters of Barbara Graham and the experiences of reporter Ed Montgomery. The United Artists marketing department exploited the “true story” angle in the promotion and publicity for the film, which was made only three years after the execution of the real Bloody Babs Graham.  Because it was one of those “trials of the century,” as the press likes to dub any high-profile murder case, it would have been fresh in the minds of many audience members. But that doesn’t mean that the film was an accurate portrayal of Graham’s life or crimes. Hollywood fictional narratives never are, which inevitably leads to nitpickers and naysayers who point out scenes and characters that are not accurate. The “true story” angle is generally at odds with the filmmakers’ agenda, which is to aim for a universal truth or a criticism of society rather than accuracy for its own sake.

It is better to think of I Want to Live as an example of a social problem film rather than an accurate depiction of Graham and her case. Social problem films were a popular genre during the 1950s, and several of them garnered awards and acclaim as they pointed out the issues and problems of American society. Both I Want to Live and Montgomery’s book are condemnations of the death penalty and a sympathetic portrait of lower-class women whose lack of opportunity can doom them to a marginal existence. Director Robert Wise chose to watch an execution as research for the film, which seems to me to be beyond the call of duty for a filmmaker, and the depiction of capital punishment as cruel and unusual, and therefore immoral, occurs at the end when Graham is prepared for execution.  After several attempts to get her sentence commuted have failed, she is resigned to her fate and maintains a brave front during her transfer to San Quentin. The pacing of the final sequence is deliberate and tense as Wise depicts every detail of the preparation for execution in a documentary -like manner, making it chillingly real. 

wantlive3

A POWERFUL STATEMENT AGAINST CAPITAL PUNISHMENT.

When the day finally arrives, Barbara chats with a friendly nurse as preparations continue, but 45 minutes before the execution, the governor declares a stay , which at first seems like a relief. But, the last-minute writ that prompted the stay is denied, and the execution is ordered to go on. In my favorite scene, which Hayward captures beautifully, Graham dons a sexy dress, dangling earrings, and high heels to meet her fate — a final act of female defiance at the male-dominated establishment. She makes it all the way inside the chamber, when the phone rings and another stay is declared in order to consider an amended writ. The effect is nerve-wracking not only on Graham but on the audience. Barbara loses her bravado at this point as she is helped back to her cell. The writ is denied again, and the execution is back on. In the endless series of stays and postponements, the system of capital punishment toys with the life and death of an inmate, which seems cruel and immoral– like a cat who toys with a bird before killing it.

 The issue of capital punishment  still provokes debate. A few years ago, Governor George Ryan of Illinois released prisoners from death row because so many of them had been wrongly convicted and railroaded by the press and the system. The fact that most people on death row are poor, lower class, and disenfranchised was brought out in the very media that too often influences important trials. The decision was a controversial move from a governor who was later convicted of corruption himself, but it showed that our judicial system can be corrupt, unfair, and inequitable.  Though 50 years old, I Want to Live seems very contemporary in both  style and relevancy, which speaks well of the film — but badly of our inability to dispense justice with fairness and objectivity.

0 Response Thoughts on a Powerful Actress in Her Best Role
Posted By Sam Nova : January 19, 2009 6:16 pm

Suzi you did again, for me, this is a great blog, I always had a feeling for women like Graham, street women, who for one reason or another ended up this way, my reasoning being it was because of the male domination, I, to this day respect all women and more so, for women who fight this male domination. She passed away much too young, I have in a movie book a picture of her from the movie AMONG THE LIVING (which I have been looking for the last 20 years), in this picture you can see the emotion in her face, to me the sign of a great star. thank You Suzi. Sam Nova

Posted By Sam Nova : January 19, 2009 6:16 pm

Suzi you did again, for me, this is a great blog, I always had a feeling for women like Graham, street women, who for one reason or another ended up this way, my reasoning being it was because of the male domination, I, to this day respect all women and more so, for women who fight this male domination. She passed away much too young, I have in a movie book a picture of her from the movie AMONG THE LIVING (which I have been looking for the last 20 years), in this picture you can see the emotion in her face, to me the sign of a great star. thank You Suzi. Sam Nova

Posted By moirafinnie : January 19, 2009 7:56 pm

Hi Suzi,
I found I Want To Live! to be a movie that built in power as it went on, as it detailed the fallibility of the central character as well as the justice system. The last half hour, as you describe so well, becomes gradually quieter, until the primary dominant sounds are those of the mechanized death chamber.

Sound always seems to be an important, beautifully handled element in Robert Wise‘s movies, (and not necessarily just that in his musicals). This is particularly striking in one of his best movies, Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), which is also being broadcast later this evening on Tue. Jan. 20th at 12:00 AM on TCM.

Your blog does a great job highlighting the remarkable versatility and craftsmanship of Robert Wise, whose 2005 obituaries headlined his most popular movies, West Side Story and The Sound of Music. The director was so much more, though, since he did not easily fit into the popular auteur theory, and his career was that of a highly skilled craftsman who made films as a collective enterprise in many genre-defying films. Thanks for writing about this film.

Posted By moirafinnie : January 19, 2009 7:56 pm

Hi Suzi,
I found I Want To Live! to be a movie that built in power as it went on, as it detailed the fallibility of the central character as well as the justice system. The last half hour, as you describe so well, becomes gradually quieter, until the primary dominant sounds are those of the mechanized death chamber.

Sound always seems to be an important, beautifully handled element in Robert Wise‘s movies, (and not necessarily just that in his musicals). This is particularly striking in one of his best movies, Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), which is also being broadcast later this evening on Tue. Jan. 20th at 12:00 AM on TCM.

Your blog does a great job highlighting the remarkable versatility and craftsmanship of Robert Wise, whose 2005 obituaries headlined his most popular movies, West Side Story and The Sound of Music. The director was so much more, though, since he did not easily fit into the popular auteur theory, and his career was that of a highly skilled craftsman who made films as a collective enterprise in many genre-defying films. Thanks for writing about this film.

Posted By Medusa : January 20, 2009 12:48 pm

Thanks for a wonderful post about a movie that has haunted me for many years. As a youngster I watched this on one of the old primetime network movie showcases and was completely fascinated especially by the whole death row sequence. When she has to put on that stethoscope so they can listen to her heart, when he has to take off her high heels, when she asks for that mask so she doesn’t have to look at the people staring at her in the chamber…unforgettable, made more so by Hayward’s strength as an actress which allowed her to portray such a character with both intensity and vulnerability.

What a movie! I have watched it many many times since and if it’s on I always try to catch it. (Remade for TV in 1983 with Lindsay Wagner in the title role but not even close in emotional impact.)

Great post, SuziD!

Posted By Medusa : January 20, 2009 12:48 pm

Thanks for a wonderful post about a movie that has haunted me for many years. As a youngster I watched this on one of the old primetime network movie showcases and was completely fascinated especially by the whole death row sequence. When she has to put on that stethoscope so they can listen to her heart, when he has to take off her high heels, when she asks for that mask so she doesn’t have to look at the people staring at her in the chamber…unforgettable, made more so by Hayward’s strength as an actress which allowed her to portray such a character with both intensity and vulnerability.

What a movie! I have watched it many many times since and if it’s on I always try to catch it. (Remade for TV in 1983 with Lindsay Wagner in the title role but not even close in emotional impact.)

Great post, SuziD!

Posted By Al Lowe : January 20, 2009 3:36 pm

Susan Hayward faced stiff competition in the 1958 Oscar race for Best Actress.
The contenders included Elizabeth Taylor and her “Maggie the Cat is alive!” performance in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. TCM uses the clip to promote the station. The newcomer, Shirley MacLaine, was attracting a lot of attention with her sympathetic performance in Some Came Running. Rosalind Russell had the role of her life in Auntie Mame; it didn’t matter that she overacted and was nowhere near her best, as shown by His Girl Friday. And there was poor Deborah Kerr in Separate Tables; she was always giving great performances and never getting the prize.
But Susan got it and deserved it. I think one reason movie buffs watch the Oscars is to feel satisfied when the right person wins.
When I caught up with the film about three years ago, I am ashamed to admit that I was focused on the fact that Hayward was losing her looks. That great beauty that I loved in earlier films was fading. All those close-ups didn’t help.
I have to think that she didn’t care. She was acting, by God, and saying to the audience, “Watch this!”

Posted By Al Lowe : January 20, 2009 3:36 pm

Susan Hayward faced stiff competition in the 1958 Oscar race for Best Actress.
The contenders included Elizabeth Taylor and her “Maggie the Cat is alive!” performance in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. TCM uses the clip to promote the station. The newcomer, Shirley MacLaine, was attracting a lot of attention with her sympathetic performance in Some Came Running. Rosalind Russell had the role of her life in Auntie Mame; it didn’t matter that she overacted and was nowhere near her best, as shown by His Girl Friday. And there was poor Deborah Kerr in Separate Tables; she was always giving great performances and never getting the prize.
But Susan got it and deserved it. I think one reason movie buffs watch the Oscars is to feel satisfied when the right person wins.
When I caught up with the film about three years ago, I am ashamed to admit that I was focused on the fact that Hayward was losing her looks. That great beauty that I loved in earlier films was fading. All those close-ups didn’t help.
I have to think that she didn’t care. She was acting, by God, and saying to the audience, “Watch this!”

Posted By Carolyn Begley : January 21, 2009 2:10 pm

To whome it may concern:
I Have loved watching Susan HaywardI think she was one of the finest actress I sure wish they made pictures like (I want to live)as far as im concerned they dont make movies any movies like they did back in the 30s 40s and the 50s but of course they went to school to learn to be an actress or & actor and Thank GOD Turner Classic Movies still has the greatest movies ever.
You might say that i am stuck in the 30s 40s &50s people like John Wayne,Humprey Bogart, June Allison, Dick Powell, Myrna Loy, William Powell, Edward G Robinson,Boris Karloff,Lon Cheney, Marks Brothers,Bela Lagosi,James Cagney,also i might add that im glad to be stuck in the 30s 40s &50 i am almost 70 yrs old and i thank god that i still can remember all those people plus movies And i thank you Ted Turner for playing all those movies for me . Mrs Carolyn J Begley
420 A Sam Houston Dr
Lebanon Tenn
37087

Posted By Carolyn Begley : January 21, 2009 2:10 pm

To whome it may concern:
I Have loved watching Susan HaywardI think she was one of the finest actress I sure wish they made pictures like (I want to live)as far as im concerned they dont make movies any movies like they did back in the 30s 40s and the 50s but of course they went to school to learn to be an actress or & actor and Thank GOD Turner Classic Movies still has the greatest movies ever.
You might say that i am stuck in the 30s 40s &50s people like John Wayne,Humprey Bogart, June Allison, Dick Powell, Myrna Loy, William Powell, Edward G Robinson,Boris Karloff,Lon Cheney, Marks Brothers,Bela Lagosi,James Cagney,also i might add that im glad to be stuck in the 30s 40s &50 i am almost 70 yrs old and i thank god that i still can remember all those people plus movies And i thank you Ted Turner for playing all those movies for me . Mrs Carolyn J Begley
420 A Sam Houston Dr
Lebanon Tenn
37087

Posted By Joe aka Mongo : January 21, 2009 4:26 pm

Suzi, an interesting blog on one of my favorite actresses. I just watched Miss Hayward in her Oscar nominated role as Lillian Roth in “I’ll Cry Tomorrow” on TCM and from what I hear she did her own singing.
Of course her tour de force was as Barbara Graham in “I Want to Live!”. She pulled out all stops in a performance that finally won her a well deserved Oscar. Only question I have is, was the real Barbara Graham guilty or framed? I guess we will never know.

Posted By Joe aka Mongo : January 21, 2009 4:26 pm

Suzi, an interesting blog on one of my favorite actresses. I just watched Miss Hayward in her Oscar nominated role as Lillian Roth in “I’ll Cry Tomorrow” on TCM and from what I hear she did her own singing.
Of course her tour de force was as Barbara Graham in “I Want to Live!”. She pulled out all stops in a performance that finally won her a well deserved Oscar. Only question I have is, was the real Barbara Graham guilty or framed? I guess we will never know.

Posted By Vargas : January 23, 2009 12:08 am

Thank you for an excellent article. I must watch this film again!

Posted By Vargas : January 23, 2009 12:08 am

Thank you for an excellent article. I must watch this film again!

Posted By debbe : January 23, 2009 1:21 pm

better late than never. Suzidoll, amazing blog. I have to admit I have never seen this film, but will look for it now. I did have the privilege of hearing Robert Wise speak 12 years ago . he showed clips from his films and spoke wisely ( sorry ) about acting and actresses- and at that time a remake of one of his films was being made with catherine zeta jones and lili taylor. I was a kid, my parents went on a business trip, i stayed at my favorite aunts and was allowed to stay up and watch ” with a song in my heart.” I loved it. and was the only kid at king school who knew who susan hayward was. Great blog. cant wait to see the movie. grey’s anatomy just did a three parter about a male serial killer who will be executed in five days. He eventually was and the questions you bring up about the death penalty etc are as important today as they were when I want to live was made. keep em coming suzi doll.

Posted By debbe : January 23, 2009 1:21 pm

better late than never. Suzidoll, amazing blog. I have to admit I have never seen this film, but will look for it now. I did have the privilege of hearing Robert Wise speak 12 years ago . he showed clips from his films and spoke wisely ( sorry ) about acting and actresses- and at that time a remake of one of his films was being made with catherine zeta jones and lili taylor. I was a kid, my parents went on a business trip, i stayed at my favorite aunts and was allowed to stay up and watch ” with a song in my heart.” I loved it. and was the only kid at king school who knew who susan hayward was. Great blog. cant wait to see the movie. grey’s anatomy just did a three parter about a male serial killer who will be executed in five days. He eventually was and the questions you bring up about the death penalty etc are as important today as they were when I want to live was made. keep em coming suzi doll.

Posted By Gary : January 23, 2009 9:31 pm

I saw this movie the first time on TV many years ago. Later I saw it on tape and DVD. I remember the execution scene being slightly different and I have asked others and they agree. The first time I saw it she was wearing a dress and black pumps. She was told to take off her shoes and she calmly replied, ‘I look better with them on.” Then the scene went to the guards placing the rug down and when the camera came back to Susan Hayward she was standing there with her shoes off. The other times I’ve seen it she was in a skirt and jacket with opentoed shoes. The rug was put down and she asked what it was for. When told she would have to take her shoes off she agressivlt refused.
Was there two different takes shot of this scene, if so where can I find the first one I described. So many other people remember it this way also so there must be something there.

Posted By Gary : January 23, 2009 9:31 pm

I saw this movie the first time on TV many years ago. Later I saw it on tape and DVD. I remember the execution scene being slightly different and I have asked others and they agree. The first time I saw it she was wearing a dress and black pumps. She was told to take off her shoes and she calmly replied, ‘I look better with them on.” Then the scene went to the guards placing the rug down and when the camera came back to Susan Hayward she was standing there with her shoes off. The other times I’ve seen it she was in a skirt and jacket with opentoed shoes. The rug was put down and she asked what it was for. When told she would have to take her shoes off she agressivlt refused.
Was there two different takes shot of this scene, if so where can I find the first one I described. So many other people remember it this way also so there must be something there.

Posted By suzidoll : January 24, 2009 2:08 pm

Thanks to everyone on their kind words on my post. I am glad so many people appreciate Susan Hayward, who doesn’t get the attention that other great Hollywood stars do.

Gary: I am not aware that there were two versions of the scene in question. Perhaps in watching a TV print, some parts of the scene were cut out to fit a time slot, so you missed some crucial parts of the scene. It is showing on Turner on January 27 in the afternoon, so that might settle these questions for you.

Posted By suzidoll : January 24, 2009 2:08 pm

Thanks to everyone on their kind words on my post. I am glad so many people appreciate Susan Hayward, who doesn’t get the attention that other great Hollywood stars do.

Gary: I am not aware that there were two versions of the scene in question. Perhaps in watching a TV print, some parts of the scene were cut out to fit a time slot, so you missed some crucial parts of the scene. It is showing on Turner on January 27 in the afternoon, so that might settle these questions for you.

Posted By TCM’s Classic Movie Blog : February 20, 2009 8:54 am

[...] Live, winning the Oscar for her role as tough gal/Death Row inmate Barbara Graham.  (Movie Morlock Suzidoll recently wrote an amazing piece here on the movie and Hayward’s performance.)  In 1961, Spencer Tracy was nominated as [...]

Posted By TCM’s Classic Movie Blog : February 20, 2009 8:54 am

[...] Live, winning the Oscar for her role as tough gal/Death Row inmate Barbara Graham.  (Movie Morlock Suzidoll recently wrote an amazing piece here on the movie and Hayward’s performance.)  In 1961, Spencer Tracy was nominated as [...]

Posted By Errol Jones : January 5, 2010 10:52 pm

I am 68 years old…and avid SUSAN HAYWARD fan and NEVER have I heard such a story of her in footage with the shoes off in the death walk scene of I WANT TO LIVE. I am not talking about tv versions..I am talking about the theatrical release that the public
saw in the theaters. That is why they ‘line’ she has…about..”I look better with them on..” was so important in the film. Someone must be having grand illusions at such a thing! She had the shoes on..and they let her keep the shoes on!

Watch this film (as I do her others) as many times as I watch them
and you will know that there is ‘no scene’ in the film that changes from ‘shoes on to shoes off’…Sounds as bad as Bogey saying…”Play it again Sam” from CASABLANCA, which he never said
but the ‘public’ said it that way…so it has always been thought
that he said it in the film..which he never did. Ask Lauren Bacall..she gets a little peeved every time she hears this said.

Posted By Errol Jones : January 5, 2010 10:52 pm

I am 68 years old…and avid SUSAN HAYWARD fan and NEVER have I heard such a story of her in footage with the shoes off in the death walk scene of I WANT TO LIVE. I am not talking about tv versions..I am talking about the theatrical release that the public
saw in the theaters. That is why they ‘line’ she has…about..”I look better with them on..” was so important in the film. Someone must be having grand illusions at such a thing! She had the shoes on..and they let her keep the shoes on!

Watch this film (as I do her others) as many times as I watch them
and you will know that there is ‘no scene’ in the film that changes from ‘shoes on to shoes off’…Sounds as bad as Bogey saying…”Play it again Sam” from CASABLANCA, which he never said
but the ‘public’ said it that way…so it has always been thought
that he said it in the film..which he never did. Ask Lauren Bacall..she gets a little peeved every time she hears this said.

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