My Favorite Bookworm or: Where in the World is Edna May Wonacott?

There’s one member of the frequently annoying species known as child actor that I’m gaga over, one little kid I just can’t get enough of.  It’s young Edna May Wonacott, who co-stars as Ann Newton in Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt, from 1943.   Reportedly director Hitchcock’s favorite film of his own, SoaD has been written about several times by fellow Morlocks but we haven’t said enough about Miss Wonacott’s terrific performance.  As the pigtailed, bespectacled, and serious-minded Ann, younger sister to star Teresa Wright’s Charlie (namesake of the secretly evil Uncle Charlie — the amazing Joseph Cotten – who comes to visit), Wonacott is earnest, intelligent, and quite amusing as the family’s resident budding young intellectual with her nose forever buried in a book.

We are introduced to Ann as she’s engrossed in reading Ivanhoe, and gets interrupted by a phone call for her mother.  She’s polite, to be sure, but slightly annoyed at being taken away from her book — which she continues to read throughout the call — and when the caller wants to leave a message Ann looks for a pencil with one fleeting glance and when she can’t find one manages to wiggle out of taking the information down.  She’s given a lot of character build-up in this sequence, which continues when her father, played by Henry Travers, comes home from work at the local bank with a copy of Unsolved Crimes magazine tucked under his arm.  Ann chides him for his choice of reading material and can’t be pried away from that book of hers.

She’s plenty amusing when her mother finally comes in and rings up the telegraph office to get her message.  Noting how her mother has raised her voice to talk into the receiver to conquer the distance, Ann is dismayed.  “She makes no allowance for science,” she critiques, so much the modern kid with a better grasp of technology than her parents.  (Not much has changed very much in society over the last 65 years, has it?) 

The character of Ann Newton may be kind of the typical precocious kid sister, but nobody does it better than she does.  I think what makes her so appealing and effective is that there’s none of the cutesy Hollywood-brat in her at all.  And how could there be?  Director Hitchcock discovered Edna May on the streets of Santa Rosa, California, as he scouted for locations for Shadow of a Doubt.  She was the daughter of a local grocer, and though many local Santa Rosans were used as background extras in the film, Edna May was such a find that she ended up with the very major role of Ann, opposite some of Hollywood’s most accomplished actors and actresses.  She more than held her own in the company of Teresa Wright, Joseph Cotten, Patricia Collinge as her mother, the aforementioned Travers, MacDonald Carey and Hume Cronyn.   (Young Charles Bates played Ann’s little brother Roger; he had already been in several movies by 1943.)

The movie is superb on all levels, but I think it really comes alive when Edna is onscreen, offering that little touch of comic relief, gently applied, but also supplying a refreshing skepticism that pegs Uncle Charlie as someone not to be trusted almost from the very beginning.  She’s especially ticked when Uncle Charlie tries to distract her with a bit of trick paper folding; “I’m not a baby,” she explains impatiently to him, and she also is less than thrilled with the stuffed animal toy that he’s brought her as a gift.  Ann is quite obviously a misfit in the family, as is Teresa Wright, both of them too smart for their small town and wondering why everybody else isn’t too. 

There are a number of other nice scenes with Edna May.  Ann and Charlie have to share a room while Uncle is in town, and she gives an amusing rushed bedtime prayer — “God Bless Mama, Papa, Captain Midnight, Veronica Lake and the President of the United States” — before Charlie cautions that she won’t be able to include everybody — and then Ann ends up with a reluctant “And Uncle Charlie” before plopping her head onto the pillow.  The inclusion of Captain Midnight and Veronica Lake is hilarious, especially with Ann being such a studious little girl, and Wonacott pulls off the scene like a pro. 

Ann Newton also strikes up a friendship with the two detectives masquerading as pollsters who are on the trail of the Merry Widow Murderer, and her repartee with both grown men is charming but without any posing or cutesy cloying artifice.  She’s simply a unique little girl, genuinely wise beyond her years, and honestly has it all figured out.

Edna May Wonacott made a few more movies, including a role in Bing Crosby and Ingrid Bergman’s 1945 The Bells of St. Mary’s, but seems to have given up show business entirely in 1951.  Some internet sleuthing led me to happily find out that she’s still alive, and her married name is Edna May Green.  I hope that wherever she is she knows how much so many of us love her amazing performance in Shadow of a Doubt.  I’m sure many of you have your own favorite child actors, but you’ve got to admit — beyond any shadow of a doubt, Edna May Wonacott was a treasure.

 

(And an interesting P.S. — The entire film of Shadow of a Doubt is available for viewing or download at the fabulous Internet Archive website.  Peruse their other wonderful treats, too — it’s a tremendous resource!)

56 Responses My Favorite Bookworm or: Where in the World is Edna May Wonacott?
Posted By Steve-O : August 3, 2008 10:47 pm

Thanks for linking our Noir of the Week on Shadow of a Doubt…

Posted By Steve-O : August 3, 2008 10:47 pm

Thanks for linking our Noir of the Week on Shadow of a Doubt…

Posted By RHS : August 4, 2008 1:33 am

Aw, Medusa gets credit for everything! (Some people say she invented the Internet.)

Posted By RHS : August 4, 2008 1:33 am

Aw, Medusa gets credit for everything! (Some people say she invented the Internet.)

Posted By moirafinnie : August 4, 2008 12:47 pm

Your focus on this precociously bright girl impersonated so brilliantly by Edna May Wonacott in Shadow of a Doubt made me think that Hitchcock might have used his own observations of his only child, the precociously bright Patricia Hitchcock, as a model for this character.

Having seen her interviewed several times over the years, the very bright and honest Ms. Hitchcock seems to have had an unusually mature relationship with her talented mother (and the director’s closest collaborator), Alma Reville, and her famous father. As a youngster, and later, in film appearances, (perhaps most notably in Strangers on a Train), she often appeared wearing similar glasses and a bit of a smart aleck attitude. Fortunately, Patricia Hitchcock also seems to have found a way to put all her unusual experiences into perspective. She comes across as a friendly, down-to-earth woman.

As with many perceptive girls, the character played by Edna May seems to have a somewhat resigned attitude toward the condescending adults around her, (especially if she can find a way to also patronize her naive younger brother too). Her insights into the world may be funny and dead-on about the inadequacies of those around her, but–as is subtly underlined in her place in the family in “Shadow..”, Ann Newton is, for all her superiority and humor, an isolated figure whose sharp-tongued observations and depth of understanding are often ignored in her family circle.

Do you think that Teresa Wright‘s character was much like her sister at that age in this film?

Posted By moirafinnie : August 4, 2008 12:47 pm

Your focus on this precociously bright girl impersonated so brilliantly by Edna May Wonacott in Shadow of a Doubt made me think that Hitchcock might have used his own observations of his only child, the precociously bright Patricia Hitchcock, as a model for this character.

Having seen her interviewed several times over the years, the very bright and honest Ms. Hitchcock seems to have had an unusually mature relationship with her talented mother (and the director’s closest collaborator), Alma Reville, and her famous father. As a youngster, and later, in film appearances, (perhaps most notably in Strangers on a Train), she often appeared wearing similar glasses and a bit of a smart aleck attitude. Fortunately, Patricia Hitchcock also seems to have found a way to put all her unusual experiences into perspective. She comes across as a friendly, down-to-earth woman.

As with many perceptive girls, the character played by Edna May seems to have a somewhat resigned attitude toward the condescending adults around her, (especially if she can find a way to also patronize her naive younger brother too). Her insights into the world may be funny and dead-on about the inadequacies of those around her, but–as is subtly underlined in her place in the family in “Shadow..”, Ann Newton is, for all her superiority and humor, an isolated figure whose sharp-tongued observations and depth of understanding are often ignored in her family circle.

Do you think that Teresa Wright‘s character was much like her sister at that age in this film?

Posted By Medusa : August 5, 2008 4:29 pm

Mopira, I’d surmise that Charlie was as smart as Ann, but possibly more conventially prettier and not wearing glasses, which would give her a leg up. Plus she was the first-born, which is easier than being the middle child. Poor Ann! She just couldn’t win….

Great observation about Pat Hitchcock — you are right…I’ve seen interviews and she does look and sound like a grown-up Ann Newton! Aha! Excellent revelation!

I’m sure I also identify with Ann because I was a young bookworm — I think a few of our Morlocks were! :-)

Posted By Medusa : August 5, 2008 4:29 pm

Mopira, I’d surmise that Charlie was as smart as Ann, but possibly more conventially prettier and not wearing glasses, which would give her a leg up. Plus she was the first-born, which is easier than being the middle child. Poor Ann! She just couldn’t win….

Great observation about Pat Hitchcock — you are right…I’ve seen interviews and she does look and sound like a grown-up Ann Newton! Aha! Excellent revelation!

I’m sure I also identify with Ann because I was a young bookworm — I think a few of our Morlocks were! :-)

Posted By Deano : August 8, 2008 2:45 pm

As SHADOW OF A DOUBT is one of my favorite Hitchcocks, I have to say that I’m impressed, Medusa, with your centering in on one of the key elements that makes it such a joy to watch. There are, strangely, a great many laughs in this movie (many of them swamp-water dark, which is I’m sure what makes it Hitch’s favorite of his own films). But Edna’s performance here is an undeniable bright spot, and certainly one of the most distinctive child performances of that or any other era. The crispness of her voice, the precision of her movement, the carefully-written dialogue given to her by Hitch and Thornton Wilder–all are seared into the memory of anyone who views the film. Since she is a supporting player, though, one tends to forget about her after all the drama that befall the two Charlies. That’s not a bad thing, though, because when one goes to watch it again, and Edna comes on the screen, you almost jump out of your seat in joy when she starts to speak, because you realize that she’s one of the film’s jewels. BTW, I mentioned Thornton Wilder and I don’t think we should discount his contribution to the character’s makeup; there are certain things about her observation that echo the talk amongst the denizens of Grover’s Corner in OUR TOWN.

A totally unique take on this great movie! Thanks, Medusa! And I hope Edna gets to see these comments. She may have only made a lasting impression in one or two major films, but Orson Welles said you only need one. Edna is proof of that, I’d say.

Posted By Deano : August 8, 2008 2:45 pm

As SHADOW OF A DOUBT is one of my favorite Hitchcocks, I have to say that I’m impressed, Medusa, with your centering in on one of the key elements that makes it such a joy to watch. There are, strangely, a great many laughs in this movie (many of them swamp-water dark, which is I’m sure what makes it Hitch’s favorite of his own films). But Edna’s performance here is an undeniable bright spot, and certainly one of the most distinctive child performances of that or any other era. The crispness of her voice, the precision of her movement, the carefully-written dialogue given to her by Hitch and Thornton Wilder–all are seared into the memory of anyone who views the film. Since she is a supporting player, though, one tends to forget about her after all the drama that befall the two Charlies. That’s not a bad thing, though, because when one goes to watch it again, and Edna comes on the screen, you almost jump out of your seat in joy when she starts to speak, because you realize that she’s one of the film’s jewels. BTW, I mentioned Thornton Wilder and I don’t think we should discount his contribution to the character’s makeup; there are certain things about her observation that echo the talk amongst the denizens of Grover’s Corner in OUR TOWN.

A totally unique take on this great movie! Thanks, Medusa! And I hope Edna gets to see these comments. She may have only made a lasting impression in one or two major films, but Orson Welles said you only need one. Edna is proof of that, I’d say.

Posted By Charlie : August 16, 2008 6:02 pm

In the 1980′s my wife and I met Joseph Cotten at a screening SOAD at the AFI theatre in the Kennedy Center. He said he was with Hitch when he discovered Edna May on the street in Santa Rosa. Cotten wondered what had happened to her after the film. At that point, a man in the audience spoke up and said he went to school with Edna May and told of the family’s moving from Santa Rosa to LA to benefit her potential career. Alsa, he said, she never made another film with any distinct role, her best being a choir member in ST.MARY’S. She was a fine young actress and it is too bad she never made it in Hollywood. Glad to hear she is alive and well.

Posted By Charlie : August 16, 2008 6:02 pm

In the 1980′s my wife and I met Joseph Cotten at a screening SOAD at the AFI theatre in the Kennedy Center. He said he was with Hitch when he discovered Edna May on the street in Santa Rosa. Cotten wondered what had happened to her after the film. At that point, a man in the audience spoke up and said he went to school with Edna May and told of the family’s moving from Santa Rosa to LA to benefit her potential career. Alsa, he said, she never made another film with any distinct role, her best being a choir member in ST.MARY’S. She was a fine young actress and it is too bad she never made it in Hollywood. Glad to hear she is alive and well.

Posted By Edna May Wonacott Green : August 16, 2008 10:11 pm

I’m replying to let you know what has happened to Edna May Wonacott Green. I’m married and have been for 57 years to my husband Bob. We have three sons, two grandsons, and three greatgrand children. We live in Yuma, AZ. and have for the last 13 years. I’ve enjoyed all your articles about “Ann Newton” and it has brought back some wonderful memories of my childhood. Pat Hitchock and I became close friends even though she was a few years older and when we went to Hollywood I sometimes would go over to their house and spend weekends with the Hitchcoks. Thanks again for all the wonderful things you said about me.

Posted By Edna May Wonacott Green : August 16, 2008 10:11 pm

I’m replying to let you know what has happened to Edna May Wonacott Green. I’m married and have been for 57 years to my husband Bob. We have three sons, two grandsons, and three greatgrand children. We live in Yuma, AZ. and have for the last 13 years. I’ve enjoyed all your articles about “Ann Newton” and it has brought back some wonderful memories of my childhood. Pat Hitchock and I became close friends even though she was a few years older and when we went to Hollywood I sometimes would go over to their house and spend weekends with the Hitchcoks. Thanks again for all the wonderful things you said about me.

Posted By Tracy Green : August 17, 2008 10:15 pm

Thank you for the kind words about my mother. Yes I am the reason that you no longer see her in the movies. I have been told many times ” that was no business to raise children in” this saint has never stoped her self sacrifice for her children, ailing mother that lived to be over 100, and now my father batteling cancer. I am prowd to be her son and will never fill her shoes no matter how hard I try.

Posted By Tracy Green : August 17, 2008 10:15 pm

Thank you for the kind words about my mother. Yes I am the reason that you no longer see her in the movies. I have been told many times ” that was no business to raise children in” this saint has never stoped her self sacrifice for her children, ailing mother that lived to be over 100, and now my father batteling cancer. I am prowd to be her son and will never fill her shoes no matter how hard I try.

Posted By medusamorlock : September 8, 2008 4:15 pm

I apologize for not acknowledging earlier the wonderful comment here from Edna May Wonacott Green herself, and her son. Clearly the world of cinema lost a talent, but oh, what a lovely person the real world obviously gained. Thank you, Edna, for being such a talent and such a nice human being.

Wow…if I loved you before this, I’m even more of a fan now.

Thanks again for writing, Edna and Tracy!

Posted By medusamorlock : September 8, 2008 4:15 pm

I apologize for not acknowledging earlier the wonderful comment here from Edna May Wonacott Green herself, and her son. Clearly the world of cinema lost a talent, but oh, what a lovely person the real world obviously gained. Thank you, Edna, for being such a talent and such a nice human being.

Wow…if I loved you before this, I’m even more of a fan now.

Thanks again for writing, Edna and Tracy!

Posted By MARILYN HAUCK : October 15, 2008 6:22 pm

Edna is my best friend and she indeed is a lovely person, a very sincere wonderful lady. It is a pleasure to know her. She did a fine job of maintaining the home for her husband and sons. Knowing her has been a pleasure.

Posted By MARILYN HAUCK : October 15, 2008 6:22 pm

Edna is my best friend and she indeed is a lovely person, a very sincere wonderful lady. It is a pleasure to know her. She did a fine job of maintaining the home for her husband and sons. Knowing her has been a pleasure.

Posted By Russell Sutherland : December 16, 2008 10:35 pm

I was struck by Edna May’s performance in “Shadow of a Doubt”. To appear in a Hitchkock film is a tribute. The role inspired me to do some research on Edna May. I wondered why she did not continue on to stardom. I was born a couple of years after Ms. Green and can relate to the film. Ms. Green’s role certainly stands out even though it was not significant to the plot. The performance certainly gave realism and color to the film that a viewer can relate to.

Posted By Russell Sutherland : December 16, 2008 10:35 pm

I was struck by Edna May’s performance in “Shadow of a Doubt”. To appear in a Hitchkock film is a tribute. The role inspired me to do some research on Edna May. I wondered why she did not continue on to stardom. I was born a couple of years after Ms. Green and can relate to the film. Ms. Green’s role certainly stands out even though it was not significant to the plot. The performance certainly gave realism and color to the film that a viewer can relate to.

Posted By Phyllis : December 17, 2008 11:48 am

Unfortunately I couldn’t watch all of “shadow of a doubt” (will try and catch it on DVD), but I was SO struck by how the little girl (who I now know to be Edna May W) looked so much like the current little girl actress from “Little Miss Sunshine — both in appearance and persona. Did anyone else have the same thought?

Posted By Phyllis : December 17, 2008 11:48 am

Unfortunately I couldn’t watch all of “shadow of a doubt” (will try and catch it on DVD), but I was SO struck by how the little girl (who I now know to be Edna May W) looked so much like the current little girl actress from “Little Miss Sunshine — both in appearance and persona. Did anyone else have the same thought?

Posted By Max : December 26, 2008 3:53 pm

very nice and huge article, thx. read with pleasure :)

Posted By Max : December 26, 2008 3:53 pm

very nice and huge article, thx. read with pleasure :)

Posted By Dorothy Hocking : January 9, 2009 5:30 pm

My cousin Eileen’s daughter was married to Edna May’s nephew before his death. I remember the family telling the story of her getting a part in “Shadow of a Doubt”. Edna May, if you see this, I want you to know I have been a fan of yours ever since “Shadow” came out and we were happy to have Mike and Janet visit us on his last trip to South Dakota.

Posted By Dorothy Hocking : January 9, 2009 5:30 pm

My cousin Eileen’s daughter was married to Edna May’s nephew before his death. I remember the family telling the story of her getting a part in “Shadow of a Doubt”. Edna May, if you see this, I want you to know I have been a fan of yours ever since “Shadow” came out and we were happy to have Mike and Janet visit us on his last trip to South Dakota.

Posted By Steve Wonacott : January 25, 2009 3:14 pm

With reference to Dorothy Hocking’s comment: My grandfather was Don Casey Wonacott, brother of Ely V. Wonacott, who I believe was Edna May Wonacott’s father. My father Ray Wonacott told me that Ely and Edna May were dining in a Hollywood restaurant and Mr. Hitchcock happened to be at a nearby table. He noticed Edna May and asked if she would be interested in appearing in his movie. I would be curious to hear if this is the correct story and/or hear additional details. I just finished putting together a brief history of Don Wonacott’s family including all his brothers and sisters and would be happy to share what I learned. Email me at swonacot@wyoming.com if interested.

Posted By Steve Wonacott : January 25, 2009 3:14 pm

With reference to Dorothy Hocking’s comment: My grandfather was Don Casey Wonacott, brother of Ely V. Wonacott, who I believe was Edna May Wonacott’s father. My father Ray Wonacott told me that Ely and Edna May were dining in a Hollywood restaurant and Mr. Hitchcock happened to be at a nearby table. He noticed Edna May and asked if she would be interested in appearing in his movie. I would be curious to hear if this is the correct story and/or hear additional details. I just finished putting together a brief history of Don Wonacott’s family including all his brothers and sisters and would be happy to share what I learned. Email me at swonacot@wyoming.com if interested.

Posted By Vikki Ehret : December 27, 2009 5:24 pm

I agree wholeheartedly that Edna May was brilliant in SOAD!! I have seen the movie numerous times, and I really feel that in many ways, Edna May “carries” the movie. Even though the lead players are professional and polished in their respective roles, it is Edna who makes the movie thoroughly enjoyable!! Her smile is adorable, and she lights up the screen! It is also nice to know that she is still alive, and that she has a wonderful family…

It was fun to see her in “The Bells of St. Mary’s” as well! I own the DVD and have watched it twice this weekend!! :)

Posted By Vikki Ehret : December 27, 2009 5:24 pm

I agree wholeheartedly that Edna May was brilliant in SOAD!! I have seen the movie numerous times, and I really feel that in many ways, Edna May “carries” the movie. Even though the lead players are professional and polished in their respective roles, it is Edna who makes the movie thoroughly enjoyable!! Her smile is adorable, and she lights up the screen! It is also nice to know that she is still alive, and that she has a wonderful family…

It was fun to see her in “The Bells of St. Mary’s” as well! I own the DVD and have watched it twice this weekend!! :)

Posted By Sharon Acord : February 6, 2010 4:20 pm

Edna has been a DEAR friend for many years now and I can truthfully say that she acts just like her parts in the movies! She is a spitting image of how she looked in “Shadow” and still short, to boot! We all in the Yuma, Az area just love her to pieces and we are glad to have known such a supurb and upcoming actress who had the sense to leave show business before it corrupted her. We here in Yuma LOVE her movies and feel she held a GREAT part in them, indeed! Thanks for the wonderful coverage of this special actress and her role as Ann in “Shadow!”

Posted By Sharon Acord : February 6, 2010 4:20 pm

Edna has been a DEAR friend for many years now and I can truthfully say that she acts just like her parts in the movies! She is a spitting image of how she looked in “Shadow” and still short, to boot! We all in the Yuma, Az area just love her to pieces and we are glad to have known such a supurb and upcoming actress who had the sense to leave show business before it corrupted her. We here in Yuma LOVE her movies and feel she held a GREAT part in them, indeed! Thanks for the wonderful coverage of this special actress and her role as Ann in “Shadow!”

Posted By Vikki Ehret : February 7, 2010 3:27 pm

Thank you Sharon for your informative update! I read it this morning (on Superbowl Sunday), and since we won’t be watching the game, we had already planned to watch Shadow of a Doubt tonight! Edna certainly has a loyal friend in you, and many others there in Yuma! I am so impressed with the fact that she wanted to become a wife and mom, and as you said, that she had the sense to leave show business when she did. I was born in 1954, so SOAD was made 11 years before I was born, but it really was a treat to see it for the first time about 10 years ago. “Ann” is my favorite character in the movie, and certainly was a perfect fit!! :)

Vikki Ehret
Central Coast of California

Posted By Vikki Ehret : February 7, 2010 3:27 pm

Thank you Sharon for your informative update! I read it this morning (on Superbowl Sunday), and since we won’t be watching the game, we had already planned to watch Shadow of a Doubt tonight! Edna certainly has a loyal friend in you, and many others there in Yuma! I am so impressed with the fact that she wanted to become a wife and mom, and as you said, that she had the sense to leave show business when she did. I was born in 1954, so SOAD was made 11 years before I was born, but it really was a treat to see it for the first time about 10 years ago. “Ann” is my favorite character in the movie, and certainly was a perfect fit!! :)

Vikki Ehret
Central Coast of California

Posted By Patricia (TheLadyEve) : February 14, 2010 11:41 pm

Though this comment is being made quite a bit after this blog was posted, I owe Medusamorlock a thank you. I happened on this blog last month while doing research for a blog on “Shadow of a Doubt.” I noticed Edna’s comment and thought I might try to contact her since there were some clues to her whereabouts, etc. I did reach Edna (a wonderful woman) and what came out of our emails and a lengthy telephone conversation was a two-part blog interview. She talked about how she was discovered by Hitchcock at a Santa Rosa bus stop, her screen test, being a local celebrity, working on “Shadow of a Doubt”(and, later, “The Bells of St. Mary’s”) and much more. Not only did the blogs get a lot of views and positive response, they also brought Edna great happiness. We posted the first blog on her 78th birthday and she became the focus of much attention from family, friends and film fans. If interested, check out “Happy Birthday, Edna May” at http://classic-film-tv.blogspot.com. Thanks for your blog, Medusa, it made the rest possible…

Posted By Patricia (TheLadyEve) : February 14, 2010 11:41 pm

Though this comment is being made quite a bit after this blog was posted, I owe Medusamorlock a thank you. I happened on this blog last month while doing research for a blog on “Shadow of a Doubt.” I noticed Edna’s comment and thought I might try to contact her since there were some clues to her whereabouts, etc. I did reach Edna (a wonderful woman) and what came out of our emails and a lengthy telephone conversation was a two-part blog interview. She talked about how she was discovered by Hitchcock at a Santa Rosa bus stop, her screen test, being a local celebrity, working on “Shadow of a Doubt”(and, later, “The Bells of St. Mary’s”) and much more. Not only did the blogs get a lot of views and positive response, they also brought Edna great happiness. We posted the first blog on her 78th birthday and she became the focus of much attention from family, friends and film fans. If interested, check out “Happy Birthday, Edna May” at http://classic-film-tv.blogspot.com. Thanks for your blog, Medusa, it made the rest possible…

Posted By Patricia (TheLadyEve) : March 27, 2010 12:47 am

Referring to my last comment, the blogs I wrote were published in the Sunday, March 14, edition of The Yuma Sun, in article form. Here’s a link:

http://www.yumasun.com/articles/edna-56961-hitchcock-corner.html

Posted By Patricia (TheLadyEve) : March 27, 2010 12:47 am

Referring to my last comment, the blogs I wrote were published in the Sunday, March 14, edition of The Yuma Sun, in article form. Here’s a link:

http://www.yumasun.com/articles/edna-56961-hitchcock-corner.html

Posted By Medusa : March 27, 2010 9:13 am

Sorry about that! I messed up and pressed “Enter” before I had even started! lol

Patricia, congratulations on the wonderful article in the newspaper, and the completely adorable picture of current day Edna May. Such a nice interview and your blog posting was also terrific. So many people obviously are crazy about her — in the movies and in real life!

Nothing but love coming to her from all of us out here! Thanks, Patricia, for taking my blog posting so many steps further and giving a big public thank you and salute to Edna May, truly one of the most charming kids ever to make a movie.

Isn’t it so nice to know that her life has been so fulfilling and that she is beloved by so many? Just exactly what we would have wanted for Ann Newton!

Again, beautiful job, Patricia!

Posted By Medusa : March 27, 2010 9:13 am

Sorry about that! I messed up and pressed “Enter” before I had even started! lol

Patricia, congratulations on the wonderful article in the newspaper, and the completely adorable picture of current day Edna May. Such a nice interview and your blog posting was also terrific. So many people obviously are crazy about her — in the movies and in real life!

Nothing but love coming to her from all of us out here! Thanks, Patricia, for taking my blog posting so many steps further and giving a big public thank you and salute to Edna May, truly one of the most charming kids ever to make a movie.

Isn’t it so nice to know that her life has been so fulfilling and that she is beloved by so many? Just exactly what we would have wanted for Ann Newton!

Again, beautiful job, Patricia!

Posted By Patricia (TheLadyEve) : March 31, 2010 11:55 pm

Medusa…I was hoping you’d check back here and see what your Edna May blog set in motion…since my interview blog and feature in the Yuma paper she’s been getting requests from all over the country (and even from Europe) for autographed pix…plus she’s been invited to speak at local womens clubs and other org.s…she so deserves all this and you’re right, exactly what we would have wanted for Ann Newton…

Posted By Patricia (TheLadyEve) : March 31, 2010 11:55 pm

Medusa…I was hoping you’d check back here and see what your Edna May blog set in motion…since my interview blog and feature in the Yuma paper she’s been getting requests from all over the country (and even from Europe) for autographed pix…plus she’s been invited to speak at local womens clubs and other org.s…she so deserves all this and you’re right, exactly what we would have wanted for Ann Newton…

Posted By darren : March 26, 2011 10:22 am

i wrote to edna two weeks ago,i sent her two photos from [shadow of doubt] today recieved my photos back autographed

Posted By darren : March 26, 2011 10:22 am

i wrote to edna two weeks ago,i sent her two photos from [shadow of doubt] today recieved my photos back autographed

Posted By darren : March 26, 2011 10:23 am

if you want to see them,i could post them:O)

Posted By darren : March 26, 2011 10:23 am

if you want to see them,i could post them:O)

Posted By darren : March 26, 2011 10:30 am

thankyou edna for signing my photos,they will be cherished items:O)

Posted By darren : March 26, 2011 10:30 am

thankyou edna for signing my photos,they will be cherished items:O)

Posted By Dianne : July 6, 2012 3:25 am

I know it’s been over a year since the last post, but I just wanted to say how elated I was to find all these postings as well as the news article. I too have wondered, “whatever happened to Edna May Wonacott?” Her performance just cracks me up every time I watch SoaD. She’s so completely captivating and steals every scene she’s in without even trying. It’s probably a good thing that she had no formal acting training. Her impeccable delivery, inflections and timing are more genuine and instinctive as a result, rather than contrived. I have a VHS copy and Shadow of a Doubt is on my very short list of what I consider “perfect” movies. I just watched it again last week and never tire of seeing it. In addition to Edna May’s performance, I like the fact that everyone in the film seems to have their “star turn”. Such a nice balance. I think that Janet Shaw’s performance as the weary, oft employed cocktail waitress Louise is a particularly unsung gem of a performance as well. But that’s for another post.

Thank you Edna May, Medusa, Patricia and all the others for clearing up one of life’s little mysteries.

Posted By Dianne : July 6, 2012 3:25 am

I know it’s been over a year since the last post, but I just wanted to say how elated I was to find all these postings as well as the news article. I too have wondered, “whatever happened to Edna May Wonacott?” Her performance just cracks me up every time I watch SoaD. She’s so completely captivating and steals every scene she’s in without even trying. It’s probably a good thing that she had no formal acting training. Her impeccable delivery, inflections and timing are more genuine and instinctive as a result, rather than contrived. I have a VHS copy and Shadow of a Doubt is on my very short list of what I consider “perfect” movies. I just watched it again last week and never tire of seeing it. In addition to Edna May’s performance, I like the fact that everyone in the film seems to have their “star turn”. Such a nice balance. I think that Janet Shaw’s performance as the weary, oft employed cocktail waitress Louise is a particularly unsung gem of a performance as well. But that’s for another post.

Thank you Edna May, Medusa, Patricia and all the others for clearing up one of life’s little mysteries.

Posted By Irene V. : February 6, 2013 4:27 pm

I have always loved little Ann in the movie, Shadow of a Doubt. She will always be that beautiful, adoring little girl in my mind forever. You were indeed a treasure to watch and observe. You showed them all how to do it, and do it with class! I love You Edna (Ann) and wish you the very best, always!!

Irene V.

Posted By Irene V. : February 6, 2013 4:27 pm

I have always loved little Ann in the movie, Shadow of a Doubt. She will always be that beautiful, adoring little girl in my mind forever. You were indeed a treasure to watch and observe. You showed them all how to do it, and do it with class! I love You Edna (Ann) and wish you the very best, always!!

Irene V.

Posted By Crissy : May 15, 2013 3:14 am

Love,Love,Love Edna in this movie. I love her quick witty lines & the faces she makes when the adults question her stories. Just perfect acting for a child who was discovered on the corner.

Posted By Crissy : May 15, 2013 3:14 am

Love,Love,Love Edna in this movie. I love her quick witty lines & the faces she makes when the adults question her stories. Just perfect acting for a child who was discovered on the corner.

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