Young Cassidy (1965): A Memory Piece

The hallway of every man’s life is paced with pictures; pictures gay and pictures gloomy, all useful, for if we be wise, we can learn from them a richer and braver way to live. ~ O’Casey

The penultimate John Ford feature film, Young Cassidy (1965), completed by master cinematographer and underrated journeyman director Jack Cardiff, airs this coming Monday at 6 PM ET on TCM. It is, appropriately enough, scheduled for St. Patrick’s Day, March 17th. The film, which is not available on vhs or dvd, sank from sight soon after it premiered in March of 1965, but eventually became a vivid part of the annual celebration of that day, thanks in large part to the repetition of this “beautiful failure” on the Million Dollar Movie on New York channel WOR in the sixties and seventies.

Growing up in the Finnie household, St. Patrick’s Day brought out all the contradictions in our Irish-American family. My father, who came from a family rooted in the Irish tradition of potato farming, was trained as a lawyer but had an introspective, scholarly nature and a keen awareness of history. He was always a bit leery of my urbane, educated half Irish mother’s enjoyment of the day. Mom would always have green carnations waiting in a vase for us to wear to school on THE day. The house was redolent with the steamy smell of corned beef and (alas) boiled cabbage. The coverage of the rowdy NYC St. Patrick’s Day by “Captain” Jack McCarthy of WPIX Ch. 11, laced with frequent rotations of rapturously beautiful Aer Lingus commercials, would blare from the idiot box for at least an hour that day. Our day at St. Patrick’s School would, of course, begin with attendance at a special Mass which climaxed with a hellacious rendition of the hymn, “Great and Glorious St. Patrick” by hundreds of kids who loved to wail out this most pugnacious paean to the patron saint of Eire.

My parents tended to regard many of the treacly St. Paddy’s Day movies on tv with ill concealed condescension, but Young Cassidy was an exception. The rambunctious, tender-hearted drama, punctuated with numerous, vivid characterizations from one of greatest casts of English and Irish actors ever, grappled bravely with themes of familial and romantic love, poverty, sorrow, adventure, lust, and even the pain of intellectual growth. Sometimes the filmmakers lost this battle, but still rendered a lovingly crafted, picaresque story filled with period detail and a sense of place.

A frail John Ford, (seated) directing the film in DublinLike the proverbial red-headed stepchild, this MGM production had a troubled history, but has much to recommend it. Perhaps Ford and author Sean O’Casey seemed to be a natural fit to the producers of Young Cassidy originally. Yet, when their director arrived in Dublin to begin pre-production immediately after a grueling shoot of Cheyenne Autumn, his work load combined with the alcoholism that had plagued him throughout his life, soon made it apparent that it would no longer be possible for him to continue with the film after two weeks of shooting. Young Cassidy had been adapted by director John Ford and scenarist John Whiting from the six volume memoirs of Irish playwright Sean O’Casey , A Mirror in My House, it compresses events into a film about Irish people struggling financially, socially and spiritually to survive during the upheaval before and after the independence of Ireland. Ford had previously adapted O’Casey‘s scathing anti-war play about “The Troubles”, The Plough and Stars, into a tepid, confusing and lachrymose RKO film in 1936 with two badly miscast leads, Preston Foster and Barbara Stanwyck, complete with wavering Irish accents and false bravado.  While O’Casey tended to favor grittier urban portrayals emphasizing the futility of warfare, his stories shared a love of small character touches with those of Ford. Philosophically and politically the two men were, in many ways poles apart. Ford also found himself at odds with his producers, who wisely urged him to film in Dublin, (where O’Casey lived) instead of the countryside the director favored, to use color, and to avoid some of the more “patented stage Irish” aspects of a typical Ford movies. Yet Ford‘s shooting script was said to have many of the grace notes of character detail found in O’Casey‘s remembrances, but the story line also tended to be punctuated by periods of rather tedious brawls, a feature of the film that was emphasized in the misguided advertisements and the trailer of the film as well, (see below for an example of the poster art that seemed to promote the film as another rowdy romp along the lines of the recent international hit of 1963, Tom Jones).The Tom Jones type poster

While treating all its characters with affection, the beautiful, yet flawed film presents a range of humanity as complex, ambivalent and contradictory as the Irish. The fast moving movie is almost too full of smaller characters we’d like to know better, whether a storekeeper scrutinizing a suspicious check being cashed by Johnny Cassidy (Rod Taylor) or an officious hearse driver (played the marvelous Donal Donnelly) who won’t nail a coffin shut until he’s paid or a prissy young man (Phillip O’Flynn) too old before his time. In much of O’Casey‘s writings and his fictionalized autobiographies the political questions are of secondary importance to the author who is more interested in the people. 

As a viewer, we are drawn to this range of vivid personalities as well, but the filmmakers, who were reportedly on a very short schedule, present us with a fascinating, rapidly paced mosaic at times. The swiftness of Johnny Cassidy’s rise from ditch-digger to Abbey Theatre playwright is partly blurred by vivid cameos of Michael Redgrave as W. B. Yeats and Edith Evans as Lady Gregory, though, Evans manages to be a fascinating mixture of intellectual seductress and maternal muse to the playwright he becomes. Another part of that colorful background are the beautifully rendered period details, such as a horse and coach, the lamps and oil that lit the homes, and the wonderful sense of mise en scène created by photographing many scenes in recognizable Dublin locations used throughout the movie. It is a “leprechaun-free” portrait of literate Irish people struggling financially and socially to survive during the upheaval before and after the Easter Uprising of 1916. Most interestingly, though the Black and Tans are depicted as brutal, the English and the Irish characters, even when they are in conflict are not generally portrayed as walking clichés. The protagonist’s brother is shown as having become somewhat upwardly mobile by joining the British military, which was true of many Irish families during the First World War. By the same token, the misadventures of the Irish rebels, particularly in one very funny scene about the “need” for uniforms, are shown as pompous and foolish as well as brave. This refreshing approach to Irish subject matter reflected the humanistic view of the author Sean O’Casey, but the sensitive performance of Rod Taylor, (in the best role of his career), holds this film together.

In a performance that is by turns jaunty, soft-spoken, poignant and angry to the point of tears, this actor, whose long career includes memorable work with such diverse filmmakers as George Pal, Alfred Hitchcock and Michelangelo Antonioni, went on to work with this film’s director, Jack Cardiff, in the facetious spy film, The Liquidator (1965) and the memorably violent movie Dark of the Sun (1968), (which is allegedly a favorite of Martin Scorsese). He’s better than alright in this movie. Taylor, whether he’s spitting at the feet of the gentry, charming a young woman, feeling awkward in a manor house or tenderly comforting his mother, imbues his role with a mixture of tenderness and rage that allows him, for at least once in his career, to transcend his all too frequent typecasting.

Critics seemed to overlook his performance and generally dismissed this film as too picaresque to hold audience’s attention. Knowing that John Ford had originally been involved in the production until he became to ill to continue, they often incorrectly ascribed scenes such as a vividly rendered labor riot toward the beginning of the film as the work of the great director. As Jack Cardiff mentioned in his memoir, Magic Hour, “I suppose I should have been flattered that my work should be considered to be the work of the master, but in fact I was indignant. I measured John Ford‘s work on the film…[which]…totalled four and a half minutes out of two hours’ screen time.” Still it does seem that Cardiff, whose adaptation of D.H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers (1960) had earned him a well deserved Oscar nomination as a director had been given short shrift by the critics for his work on this film as well.

Interestingly, Ford, whose last film, 7 Women (1966), would focus on a group of women, was said to have been attracted to the O’Casey piece because of the role of the vibrant, defeated and enduring women who enlivened his work. In O’Casey‘s plays his women are often the conscience of his work, giving the lives of the often blind male characters shape, a soul, and a reason for going on, despite defeat. Under Jack Cardiff‘s caring direction, the movie highlighted the strengths of each of the talented actresses in their respective roles.

In Young Cassidy the memorable women are played by legendary character actress Flora Robson as Taylor’s mother, who brings her great dignity and warmth to a character ground down by poverty but full of love. Delicate Sian Phillips as Taylor’s dying sister is too briefly seen, but her death and the child who comes to tell Taylor of the event is among the most tenderly acted scenes. The scene in the aftermath of his sister’s death, with Taylor brooding at the foot of a small, struggling Hawthorn tree, is amonFlora Robson as Young Cassidy's motherg those said to have been directed by Ford. In a 2001 symposium on John Ford , Rod Taylor reminisced that Ford allowed him to play the scene for so long that the actor “kind of trod across the rubble and went to cry”…”I drew the tweed cap off of my head and I had a little weep. And I wept. And wept. And shuddered and wept. I wept. I thought, ‘Isn’t the son-of-a-bitch going to tell me to exit?’ I got up, put my hat on, and walked slowly to where I knew the camera couldn’t follow me.Then I went up to the camera and said, ‘Jesus Christ, Jack–enough is enough!’ And he got up and kicked me in the shins, and said to me, ‘You Australian son of a bitch! You made me cry. That’s a wrap!’ He knew it was about time for the pubs to be open.” Taylor, who bore a youthful resemblance to the legendary director’s brother Frank Ford, was reportedly told by the ailing man to take over the direction of certain scenes, though that was apparently not done once the gifted Cardiff came on board the project. As the actor explains it, the relationship between himself and Ford, despite the fact that they came from very different generations, appears to have been one of gruff affection–though it couldn’t have helped Ford‘s health to try to compete in the pubs with the capacity of a man who was 35 years younger for mischief.

Interestingly, another scene that Ford is said to have spent considerable time directing during his brief work on the film was an extended seduction scene between Taylor and the luminous, almost unknown Julie Christie as a sensual, high-spirited girl of the streets. If this is true, it is among the frankest portrayals of sexuality ever presented by John Ford on film.

The feminine heart of the movie, however is played by the appealing Maggie Smith in a very early role as a bookstore clerk whose loving spirit is inhibited by her sense of the respectable. Dame Maggie, as she’s now known, had developed a rapport with Rod Taylor a year before Young Cassidy, when the pair formed one of the few believable couples in the glossy The V.I.P.s (1964). In Young Cassidy, their complementary teasing and their tender relationship, as he draws her out of her shyness and she softens his rough edges, is probably among a handful of unforgettable portraits of memorable couples that I’ve ever seen in the movies. The timid Smith character of Nora, who, as one critic noted, “makes even reticence seem a powerful emotion” completely broke my heart when she finally finds that she must leave him because “I need a small, simple life—without your terrible dreams and your terrible anger.”

I hope that you’ll share your opinions of this interesting film as well.

Sources:

Cardiff, Jack, Magic Hour, Faber and Faber, 1996.
Eyman, Scott, Print the Legend: The Life and Times of John Ford, Simon & Schuster, 1999.
Krause, David
, Sean O’Casey & His World, Charles Scribners and Son.
McBride, Joseph, Searching for John Ford: A Life, St. Martin’s Press, 2001.

On Line Resources:
Cardiff, Jack at The Internet Encyclopedia of Cinematographers
Smith, Maggie at the Dame Maggie Daily Live Journal
Taylor, Rod at The Complete Rod Taylor Site

27 Responses Young Cassidy (1965): A Memory Piece
Posted By Al Lowe : March 13, 2008 3:04 am

You made me want to see this movie. In fact, it sounds like a must-see.I, too, am of Irish descent. My mother's maiden name was Cassidy and, of course, was Irish, and my father was Scotch Irish, among other nationalities. Certain Lowe relatives used to joke that the original Lowe came from Ireland and not a whole lot was known about him except he was an exceptionally nice guy………when he wasn't drinking and that was about once every six months.I don't know why I resisted seeing this picture. It was hard for me to watch Meryl Streep's "Dancing at Lughnasa," although I loved it when I finally caught up with it.Of course, I've see many of Ford's sound films, including hard-to-see ones like "Up the River."Maybe I shrugged it off because Ford's films after "The Man Who Saw Liberty Valance" were generally disappointments.Or maybe it was because subconsciously we prefer seeing a fairy tale Ireland to the grittier real thing.I didn't realize it featured all those incredible actresses and actors.Thanks, Moira. 

Posted By Al Lowe : March 13, 2008 3:04 am

You made me want to see this movie. In fact, it sounds like a must-see.I, too, am of Irish descent. My mother's maiden name was Cassidy and, of course, was Irish, and my father was Scotch Irish, among other nationalities. Certain Lowe relatives used to joke that the original Lowe came from Ireland and not a whole lot was known about him except he was an exceptionally nice guy………when he wasn't drinking and that was about once every six months.I don't know why I resisted seeing this picture. It was hard for me to watch Meryl Streep's "Dancing at Lughnasa," although I loved it when I finally caught up with it.Of course, I've see many of Ford's sound films, including hard-to-see ones like "Up the River."Maybe I shrugged it off because Ford's films after "The Man Who Saw Liberty Valance" were generally disappointments.Or maybe it was because subconsciously we prefer seeing a fairy tale Ireland to the grittier real thing.I didn't realize it featured all those incredible actresses and actors.Thanks, Moira. 

Posted By moira finnie : March 13, 2008 12:32 pm

Thanks so much for your comments, Al. Even though Young Cassidy (1965) is not a perfect film, it does linger in my memory as a celebration of upwardly striving, hardworking Irish people with a gift for language, (and mischief) even when times are hard. I'm not sure if John Ford approved of the film entirely since he wasn't able to complete it, but the actors and crew, led by Jack Cardiff's skilled hands, certainly put their heart into it. I hope that it brightens your St. Patrick's Day.  

Posted By moira finnie : March 13, 2008 12:32 pm

Thanks so much for your comments, Al. Even though Young Cassidy (1965) is not a perfect film, it does linger in my memory as a celebration of upwardly striving, hardworking Irish people with a gift for language, (and mischief) even when times are hard. I'm not sure if John Ford approved of the film entirely since he wasn't able to complete it, but the actors and crew, led by Jack Cardiff's skilled hands, certainly put their heart into it. I hope that it brightens your St. Patrick's Day.  

Posted By Joe aka Mongo : March 15, 2008 7:51 pm

Moira, a perfect tome to St. Patty's Day. I've seen the movie and have enjoyed it.  Rod Taylor was the ideal choice for the lead role in this always interesting vision of early life and career of Irish playwright Sean O'Casey.Dublin in the 1920s, with all the period feel and detail John Ford and Jack Cardiff could muster, beautifully photographed in Color and on location by Ted Scaife. I'd like to see it again.

Posted By Joe aka Mongo : March 15, 2008 7:51 pm

Moira, a perfect tome to St. Patty's Day. I've seen the movie and have enjoyed it.  Rod Taylor was the ideal choice for the lead role in this always interesting vision of early life and career of Irish playwright Sean O'Casey.Dublin in the 1920s, with all the period feel and detail John Ford and Jack Cardiff could muster, beautifully photographed in Color and on location by Ted Scaife. I'd like to see it again.

Posted By Blake Lucas : March 19, 2008 1:59 am

I love the film too.  Sorry it has never had more attention.  Although I didn't watch it today, I saw it again about six months ago.  One Ford book says he worked three weeks instead of two, and I don't thinkCardiff's "four and a half minutes" should be taken as gospel.  My feeling was that Ford directed more of it–quite a bit of maybe the first forty-five minutes through Cassidy's mother death, meaning maybe twenty minutes or so rather than the ten minutes claimed by Tag Gallagher.  And mostly, I think Cardiff kept the tone and texture pretty well, and perhaps a few especially good Ford-like shots are his.  I like what you say about the women here–and would like to point out thatFord's last films apart from this one are female-centered ("The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" "Donovan's Reef" "7 Women" and somewhat more problematically "Cheyenne Autumn" although Deborah Wright/Carroll Baker is its spiritual center).  But this one ismale centered, and it certainly is the best role of Rod Taylor's career.I think Ford was around long enough to set Taylor on the path, and that was his key contribution without directing most of the film.  Taylor definitely agreed–I heard him talk about the film and he talked about it as a film he and Ford made together, so he regarded it as most deeply Ford's.  I believe if Ford had directed all of it, it would have been a masterpiece, like most of his last films, one of the best periods of his career.  As it is, it is still a beautiful, memorable film deserving of wider recognition and certainly a DVD release at the least.

Posted By Blake Lucas : March 19, 2008 1:59 am

I love the film too.  Sorry it has never had more attention.  Although I didn't watch it today, I saw it again about six months ago.  One Ford book says he worked three weeks instead of two, and I don't thinkCardiff's "four and a half minutes" should be taken as gospel.  My feeling was that Ford directed more of it–quite a bit of maybe the first forty-five minutes through Cassidy's mother death, meaning maybe twenty minutes or so rather than the ten minutes claimed by Tag Gallagher.  And mostly, I think Cardiff kept the tone and texture pretty well, and perhaps a few especially good Ford-like shots are his.  I like what you say about the women here–and would like to point out thatFord's last films apart from this one are female-centered ("The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" "Donovan's Reef" "7 Women" and somewhat more problematically "Cheyenne Autumn" although Deborah Wright/Carroll Baker is its spiritual center).  But this one ismale centered, and it certainly is the best role of Rod Taylor's career.I think Ford was around long enough to set Taylor on the path, and that was his key contribution without directing most of the film.  Taylor definitely agreed–I heard him talk about the film and he talked about it as a film he and Ford made together, so he regarded it as most deeply Ford's.  I believe if Ford had directed all of it, it would have been a masterpiece, like most of his last films, one of the best periods of his career.  As it is, it is still a beautiful, memorable film deserving of wider recognition and certainly a DVD release at the least.

Posted By Glenn Davis : July 31, 2008 11:58 pm

Young Cassidy is indeed a fine movie and still stands up well even today, as a sensitive and deeply moving movie.
I often wonder why Rod Taylor’s career didn’t produce more of this genre?
He was asked to screen test for James Bond, but didn’t!
He was supposed to have a starring role in Dr Zhivago but didn’t!
Maybe it came down to bad choices and too many middle of the road movies.
He would have been great as Bond!, and should have been in Planet of the Apes,The Blue Max,and The Sundowners, just to name but a few.
At least he has left us a good half dozen films that will always live on, and Young Cassidy is certainly one of them!

Posted By Glenn Davis : July 31, 2008 11:58 pm

Young Cassidy is indeed a fine movie and still stands up well even today, as a sensitive and deeply moving movie.
I often wonder why Rod Taylor’s career didn’t produce more of this genre?
He was asked to screen test for James Bond, but didn’t!
He was supposed to have a starring role in Dr Zhivago but didn’t!
Maybe it came down to bad choices and too many middle of the road movies.
He would have been great as Bond!, and should have been in Planet of the Apes,The Blue Max,and The Sundowners, just to name but a few.
At least he has left us a good half dozen films that will always live on, and Young Cassidy is certainly one of them!

Posted By moirafinnie : August 2, 2008 10:00 am

Hi Glenn,
Thanks so much for adding your comments about Young Cassidy and Rod Taylor in particular. I’d heard about the James Bond role, but did not know that he’d been considered for Zhivago! I think that The Sundowners might have allowed him to express his inner Aussie, though he may have been too young to play the part of the father and husband who’d been on the road too long. Planet of the Apes would have been a good fit, though he probably didn’t want to repeat himself after The Time Machine.

One of the aspects of his talent that Young Cassidy brought out was that the part allowed him to play against type. Inside the “roaring boy” was an actor capable of considerable sensitivity. I find it interesting that Taylor became an actor primarily to finance his art education as a young man–a less remunerative path that, according to some sources, he pursues to this day as a talented painter. Some of Taylor’s work can be seen here.

As an actor, it certainly would be lovely to see Taylor play one more role on screen worthy of his gifts.

Posted By moirafinnie : August 2, 2008 10:00 am

Hi Glenn,
Thanks so much for adding your comments about Young Cassidy and Rod Taylor in particular. I’d heard about the James Bond role, but did not know that he’d been considered for Zhivago! I think that The Sundowners might have allowed him to express his inner Aussie, though he may have been too young to play the part of the father and husband who’d been on the road too long. Planet of the Apes would have been a good fit, though he probably didn’t want to repeat himself after The Time Machine.

One of the aspects of his talent that Young Cassidy brought out was that the part allowed him to play against type. Inside the “roaring boy” was an actor capable of considerable sensitivity. I find it interesting that Taylor became an actor primarily to finance his art education as a young man–a less remunerative path that, according to some sources, he pursues to this day as a talented painter. Some of Taylor’s work can be seen here.

As an actor, it certainly would be lovely to see Taylor play one more role on screen worthy of his gifts.

Posted By Glenn Davis : December 10, 2008 10:15 pm

Hi Moira,
Just out of interest, Rod is now working with Quenton Tarantino, where he plays Winston Churchill, in a film set in the Second World War!
I believe both he and Martin Scorcese are fans of Rod’s movie called “Dark of the Sun”
Now that would be a good movie to write about!!
Also another antidote regarding Young Cassidy.Rod actualy fell in love with Maggie Smith, whilst making The V.I.P’s together.
I believe he even asked her to marry him, even though he was already married at the time!
From what I gather after reading various interviews with Maggie Smith over the years, her reasons for not taking Rod up on his offer, were not unlike those given at the end of Young Cassidy, when Johnny asks Nora to marry him!
Their lives were somewhat at opposing ends of the spectrum!
I also think that Rod,s portrayal of Sean O’casey in the movie, was probably not too far from his own persona?
Probably a little too much for the sweet bird of youth to cope with?

Posted By Glenn Davis : December 10, 2008 10:15 pm

Hi Moira,
Just out of interest, Rod is now working with Quenton Tarantino, where he plays Winston Churchill, in a film set in the Second World War!
I believe both he and Martin Scorcese are fans of Rod’s movie called “Dark of the Sun”
Now that would be a good movie to write about!!
Also another antidote regarding Young Cassidy.Rod actualy fell in love with Maggie Smith, whilst making The V.I.P’s together.
I believe he even asked her to marry him, even though he was already married at the time!
From what I gather after reading various interviews with Maggie Smith over the years, her reasons for not taking Rod up on his offer, were not unlike those given at the end of Young Cassidy, when Johnny asks Nora to marry him!
Their lives were somewhat at opposing ends of the spectrum!
I also think that Rod,s portrayal of Sean O’casey in the movie, was probably not too far from his own persona?
Probably a little too much for the sweet bird of youth to cope with?

Posted By moirafinnie : December 11, 2008 6:20 pm

Glenn!!
Rod Taylor IS Winston Churchill?!

This I gotta see. If nothing else, I hope that Mr. Taylor has fun with that part. One of the best things that Quentin Tarantino has done in his films is employ many actors whose work has gone unnoticed since Hollywood moved on to the next flavor of the month, which is quite sad, since most actors become so much better after time and life has rubbed the shininess off them. I’ve enjoyed seeing Pam Grier, Robert Forster, Michael Parks and others in Tarantino‘s films and hope that this one does wonders for Rod too. Thanks for sharing your good news.

I am not at all surprised to hear that Maggie Smith and Rod Taylor may have been an item during The V.I.P.s and Young Cassidy. I agree, they were world’s apart in background, (like Nora and Johnny Cassidy in the Sean O’Casey story), but they did bring out the very best in one another on screen, at least for those two movies. Btw, Taylor, Smith and the befuddled antics of Margaret Rutherford are the only reasons to see The V.I.P.s.
Thanks very much for sharing your news.
And have a Happy Holiday.
Moira

Posted By moirafinnie : December 11, 2008 6:20 pm

Glenn!!
Rod Taylor IS Winston Churchill?!

This I gotta see. If nothing else, I hope that Mr. Taylor has fun with that part. One of the best things that Quentin Tarantino has done in his films is employ many actors whose work has gone unnoticed since Hollywood moved on to the next flavor of the month, which is quite sad, since most actors become so much better after time and life has rubbed the shininess off them. I’ve enjoyed seeing Pam Grier, Robert Forster, Michael Parks and others in Tarantino‘s films and hope that this one does wonders for Rod too. Thanks for sharing your good news.

I am not at all surprised to hear that Maggie Smith and Rod Taylor may have been an item during The V.I.P.s and Young Cassidy. I agree, they were world’s apart in background, (like Nora and Johnny Cassidy in the Sean O’Casey story), but they did bring out the very best in one another on screen, at least for those two movies. Btw, Taylor, Smith and the befuddled antics of Margaret Rutherford are the only reasons to see The V.I.P.s.
Thanks very much for sharing your news.
And have a Happy Holiday.
Moira

Posted By Glenn Davis : June 12, 2009 12:59 am

Hi Moira,
Just another quick udate on Mr Taylor.
As you may be aware,Jack Cardiff died in March.
He directed Rod in 3 movies, and they were close friends over the years.
Time magazine got Martin Scorcese, to do a eulogy in the April 11th edition.
He mentions that he often looks at Young Cassidy and Dark of the Sun, and how much he was inspired by Cardiff’s work!
Wouldn’t it be great for Scorcese to offer Rod a part in one of his movies!!:)
Heres hoping!!
I agree with your comment regarding The V.I.P.’s.
The critics at the time did too!
Almost all said that Taylor and Smith should have had more screen time, and Burton and Liz less!
Man they were so boring and one dimensional!
I am so looking forward to seeing Tarantino’s “Inglorious Berstards”
I hope this gathers more roles for Rod!!?

Take Care,

Glenn

Posted By Glenn Davis : June 12, 2009 12:59 am

Hi Moira,
Just another quick udate on Mr Taylor.
As you may be aware,Jack Cardiff died in March.
He directed Rod in 3 movies, and they were close friends over the years.
Time magazine got Martin Scorcese, to do a eulogy in the April 11th edition.
He mentions that he often looks at Young Cassidy and Dark of the Sun, and how much he was inspired by Cardiff’s work!
Wouldn’t it be great for Scorcese to offer Rod a part in one of his movies!!:)
Heres hoping!!
I agree with your comment regarding The V.I.P.’s.
The critics at the time did too!
Almost all said that Taylor and Smith should have had more screen time, and Burton and Liz less!
Man they were so boring and one dimensional!
I am so looking forward to seeing Tarantino’s “Inglorious Berstards”
I hope this gathers more roles for Rod!!?

Take Care,

Glenn

Posted By moirafinnie : June 12, 2009 3:40 pm

Hi Glenn,
Thanks so much for bringing my attention to Martin Scorsese‘s appreciation of Jack Cardiff and his films, (especially those featuring Rod Taylor) in that lovely in memoriam piece from Time magazine, which can be seen here.

I’m someone who has been enchanted by everything I’ve encountered Jack Cardiff‘s talented hand in over the years, from a startling trip to the movies to see The Long Ships to films made before I was born. Knowing that Cardiff was involved led me to my personal discovery of Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951), Black Narcissus (1947) and the best adaptation of D. H. Lawrence I’ve ever seen, in Sons and Lovers(1960).

I hope that you’re right about Mr. Taylor’s future casting in more prominent roles as a seasoned actor–if he’s interested in that. Martin Scorsese may surprise us once again, and wouldn’t that be wonderful?

Posted By moirafinnie : June 12, 2009 3:40 pm

Hi Glenn,
Thanks so much for bringing my attention to Martin Scorsese‘s appreciation of Jack Cardiff and his films, (especially those featuring Rod Taylor) in that lovely in memoriam piece from Time magazine, which can be seen here.

I’m someone who has been enchanted by everything I’ve encountered Jack Cardiff‘s talented hand in over the years, from a startling trip to the movies to see The Long Ships to films made before I was born. Knowing that Cardiff was involved led me to my personal discovery of Pandora and the Flying Dutchman (1951), Black Narcissus (1947) and the best adaptation of D. H. Lawrence I’ve ever seen, in Sons and Lovers(1960).

I hope that you’re right about Mr. Taylor’s future casting in more prominent roles as a seasoned actor–if he’s interested in that. Martin Scorsese may surprise us once again, and wouldn’t that be wonderful?

Posted By TCM's Classic Movie Blog : March 18, 2010 9:20 pm

[...] the director John Ford, this roughly 84 minute anthology black and white movie made in Ireland, which he did for free and [...]

Posted By TCM's Classic Movie Blog : March 18, 2010 9:20 pm

[...] the director John Ford, this roughly 84 minute anthology black and white movie made in Ireland, which he did for free and [...]

Posted By TCM's Classic Movie Blog : March 18, 2010 9:20 pm

[...] the director John Ford, this roughly 84 minute anthology black and white movie made in Ireland, which he did for free and [...]

Posted By Paul Buttle : February 15, 2011 8:43 am

I’ve only just become aware of this film and wonder why? There were a lot of major names associated with this film.

I wonder if the film sank without trace in England because it was deemed anti-British?(I’m English and was 18 when the film was made so I ought to have been aware of it) I’m just guessing it might have appeared anti-British given O’Casey’s Irish nationalism. (“The Wind that Blowsthe Barley” was ill-received in England because of its percieved anti-Englishness.)

If anyone knows how this film fared in Britain please let me know. And secondly Wwhy was Julie Christie’s character called Daisy Battles? – not a very Irish sounding name at all, at all.

Posted By Paul Buttle : February 15, 2011 8:43 am

I’ve only just become aware of this film and wonder why? There were a lot of major names associated with this film.

I wonder if the film sank without trace in England because it was deemed anti-British?(I’m English and was 18 when the film was made so I ought to have been aware of it) I’m just guessing it might have appeared anti-British given O’Casey’s Irish nationalism. (“The Wind that Blowsthe Barley” was ill-received in England because of its percieved anti-Englishness.)

If anyone knows how this film fared in Britain please let me know. And secondly Wwhy was Julie Christie’s character called Daisy Battles? – not a very Irish sounding name at all, at all.

Posted By Hecate : March 1, 2011 2:50 pm

I was fortunate enough to catch Young Cassidy on Turner Classic Movies about a year ago and DVR’d it and watch it over and over. I cannot believe that this movie has not made it to being available for purchase on DVD. I keep looking to see but no success as of yet. I love it and it is a very interesting movie. I cannot believe that it is not being released due to it being anti-British, as I have seen other Irish anti-British movies on DVD.

Posted By Hecate : March 1, 2011 2:50 pm

I was fortunate enough to catch Young Cassidy on Turner Classic Movies about a year ago and DVR’d it and watch it over and over. I cannot believe that this movie has not made it to being available for purchase on DVD. I keep looking to see but no success as of yet. I love it and it is a very interesting movie. I cannot believe that it is not being released due to it being anti-British, as I have seen other Irish anti-British movies on DVD.

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