Actor David Huffman 1945 - 1985Actor David Huffman would have turned 62 today, May 10th, but the talented actor with so much promise ahead of him never got the chance to grow old like most of us do.  Twenty-two years ago, when Huffman was just 39, this accomplished and likable stage, movie and television actor was brutally murdered.

" /> Actor David Huffman 1945 - 1985Actor David Huffman would have turned 62 today, May 10th, but the talented actor with so much promise ahead of him never got the chance to grow old like most of us do.  Twenty-two years ago, when Huffman was just 39, this accomplished and likable stage, movie and television actor was brutally murdered.

" /> Actor David Huffman 1945 - 1985Actor David Huffman would have turned 62 today, May 10th, but the talented actor with so much promise ahead of him never got the chance to grow old like most of us do.  Twenty-two years ago, when Huffman was just 39, this accomplished and likable stage, movie and television actor was brutally murdered.

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Remembering a Fallen Actor and Hero

David Huffman in FirefoxActor David Huffman would have turned 62 today, May 10th, but the talented actor with so much promise ahead of him never got the chance to grow old like most of us do.  Twenty-two years ago, when Huffman was just 39, this accomplished and likable stage, movie and television actor was brutally murdered.

While his name might not be familiar to everyone, David Huffman was a busy actor with a burgeoning list of credits that began with his Broadway debut in Butterflies are Free, and continued while he cut his teeth on a steady stream of TV movies and miniseries, including the lauded 1976 Eleanor and Franklin, F. Scott David Huffman co-starred in Wolf LakeFitzgerald and The Last of the Belles, Baretta, Captains and the Kings, Testimony of Two Men (anybody else rememember the Operation Prime Time offerings that put independent TV stations on the map?  I was there, baby!), Lou Grant, and the starring role in Tom Edison: The Boy Who Lit Up The World in 1979.  Huffman also branched out into movies, making his debut in the revenge action title Wolf Lake in 1978, where he played a Vietnam draft dodger who’s targeted by embittered Rod Steiger who blames Huffman for the death of his soldier son. 

He got a big break the next year when he was cast as Sylvester Stallone’s union buddy in F.I.S.T., then had roles in two popular releases Ice Castles and The Onion Field.  Horror fans remember his role in the low budget Blood Beach, and the same year he filmed the modest ripped-from-the-headlines St. Helens, about the massive volcanic explosion of the David Huffman in Blood BeachWashington mountain in May of 1980.  Art Carney co-starred as the cantankerous real-life eccentric named Harry Truman who vowed to stay put in his cabin despite the warnings of impending doom, and did just that.  This modest movie is one of those titles that is much better than it needed to be, fairly accurately recreating the uncertainty of the St. Helens pre-eruption situation, and the valiant attempts of the scientists to predict when she would blow her top.  Huffman is charming and convincing as the volcanologist who, after St. Helens starring Art Carney and David Huffmanfalling in love with a local lass and urging her to safety (okay, so they romanticized it a little) is the guy who was up on the mountain when it blew, and radioed the news just before he was incinerated and buried by the blast.

Huffman worked with action star Clint Eastwood in 1982’s Firefox, then continued making frequent TV appearances in popular favorites like Little House on the Prairie, Trapper John, M.D., Remington Steele, Newhart, as well as going back to his first love the stage to hone his craft.  In February of 1985, Huffman was appearing at San Diego’s Old Globe Theater, located in Balboa Park near the San Diego Zoo in Of Mice and Men, and was going to be leaving the production a few weeks early in order to take a role in the highly-anticipated miniseries The Blue and the Gray.  He had brought cookies to his castmates as an early goodbye gift,  and would give his last performance on the upcoming weekend. 

It was the morning of February 27, 1985, and actor David Huffman was in his van, playing the bagpipes, in the parking lot near the theater.  Close by there were shouts, an elderly couple by their motorhome yelling that somebody had broken into their vehicle, and Huffman looked up to see a David Huffman in F.I.S.T.young man fleeing the scene.  David gunned his engine and followed the suspect, only to see him disappear into the foliage of one of the steep canyons in Balboa Park.  Stopping his van and leaving it by the road in a red zone, Huffman jumped from his van and ran into Palm Canyon, chasing after the suspect who continued deeper into the thick growth.  The suspect was momentarily held back by a fence, and Huffman caught up to him.  The two men struggled and just a moment later Huffman was attacked with a sharp instrument, his chest pierced twice, and he went down. The suspect continued his escape.  Minutes later, Huffman had bled to death, and his body was found an hour later by a group of schoolchildren on a nature hike.

Hollywood was shocked, San Diego was shocked, family, friends and fans were shocked.  This was a brutal murder and the exact circumstances were not even known for a time.  The group in the parking lot who had witnessed the beginning of the chase had waited around, but when no one returned from the canyon, those witnesses, who turned out to be Canadian tourists, didn’t know what to do, so they left.  They had no idea that their hero had died while trying to help them, and in fact didn’t even know of the slaying until days later, when they read of it in the newspaper and contacted the authorities.  It was an unsolved crime until someone came forward and helped create a police drawing, then the authorities were able to track down the suspect, a 16-year-old illegal immigrant with a history of theft and violence who had been picked up by the police earlier that morning after being found prowling around a different parking lot, then dropped off at the high school he was supposed to be attending.  An hour or so later he had murdered David Huffman.

When the accused finally came to trial at the end of 1985, despite testimony that he had merely been “frightened” when he stabbed Huffman to death — using a screwdriver, as it turned out — jurors convicted him of first degree murder and he was sentenced to 26 years in jail, which must have sounded like a long time back then.  Now, twenty-two years after the crime, it’s surely not nearly enough.

At his memorial service, Huffman was remembered by his friends as “part prince, part angel, part saint.”  Clearly the circumstances leading to his death did not suggest otherwise; he came to the aid of fellow human beings, without hesitation, as a selfless hero.  Hollywood had lost a gifted actor; his wife, casting director Phyllis Huffman, had lost her husband and the father of her two sons.  In later years she would credit actor/director Clint Eastwood for helping her get back on her feet; she became Eastwood’s primary casting agent for all his films, and in fact her last two projects were his Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima.  Phyllis Huffman died in March 2006 after a short illness. 

David Huffman is remembered for his career and also, sadly, for the terrible way it was cut short.  My fellow Morlocks and I seem to touch on death aDavid Huffman Autograph on Ebay fair bit in our entries, but we do it, I’m sure, in the hopes that good and memorable things and people are indeed remembered long after they are gone, as it should be.  It’s the very least we can do for them.

(The image on the right is from an Ebay auction of his autograph.)

122 Responses Remembering a Fallen Actor and Hero
Posted By RHS : May 11, 2007 1:45 am

I remember my shock upon reading of Huffman's death in John Willis' Screen World annual in 1983.  I'd seen many of his movies and his violent death seemed all wrong for such a gentle-seeming man.  I've thought about him on and off in the almost quarter century since then and I always go back to his ending narration in St. Helens, in which his character affirms that he'd rather be there where it's happening than live a full life at the cost of missing his moment.  I'm paraphrasing from memory, but I wonder if Huffman didn't believe that himself.It's strange to think Huffman would be 62… check out the subject of my most recent blog entry, written entirely in ignorance of yours.

Posted By RHS : May 11, 2007 1:45 am

I remember my shock upon reading of Huffman's death in John Willis' Screen World annual in 1983.  I'd seen many of his movies and his violent death seemed all wrong for such a gentle-seeming man.  I've thought about him on and off in the almost quarter century since then and I always go back to his ending narration in St. Helens, in which his character affirms that he'd rather be there where it's happening than live a full life at the cost of missing his moment.  I'm paraphrasing from memory, but I wonder if Huffman didn't believe that himself.It's strange to think Huffman would be 62… check out the subject of my most recent blog entry, written entirely in ignorance of yours.

Posted By Artie : May 12, 2007 3:58 pm

I have no recollection of this actor even though I have seen two of the films you mentioned – F.I.S.T. and The Onion Field – and don't remember his face from those. James Wood pretty much walked away with The Onion Field – what a fascinating psycho he played. He's good at that. I think the criminal he was portraying just died. But back to Huffman, I'll check out Blood Beach and Wolf Lake – those sound like good old-fashioned drive-in movies.

Posted By Artie : May 12, 2007 3:58 pm

I have no recollection of this actor even though I have seen two of the films you mentioned – F.I.S.T. and The Onion Field – and don't remember his face from those. James Wood pretty much walked away with The Onion Field – what a fascinating psycho he played. He's good at that. I think the criminal he was portraying just died. But back to Huffman, I'll check out Blood Beach and Wolf Lake – those sound like good old-fashioned drive-in movies.

Posted By Greg Russell Tiderington : March 15, 2008 3:21 am

I own the movie St Helens and became a fan of Huffman's since I saw it in 1991 and cry every time and feel sad for a while as his character died and get more upset when watching it cause he really is dead. I envy Huffman wherever he is and think that there should be a true story of a movie on his life although he wasnt a big star but so what he was gifted and had great qualities. I truly believe that hes either a wandering spirit on Earth or in heaven with God. I would've told him how I admired his talent if he was still alive but was murdered when I was 10. I tried to get in contact with Phyllis but she passed away and the number was dead as I wanted to talk to her about him and how this effects me. Is there anyone out there that knows any of his surviving family members I can contact? I have lost alot of loved ones and some of their deaths were sudden. I hope someone can help me out. Im an actor too and Huffman inspired me to never give up.

Posted By Greg Russell Tiderington : March 15, 2008 3:21 am

I own the movie St Helens and became a fan of Huffman's since I saw it in 1991 and cry every time and feel sad for a while as his character died and get more upset when watching it cause he really is dead. I envy Huffman wherever he is and think that there should be a true story of a movie on his life although he wasnt a big star but so what he was gifted and had great qualities. I truly believe that hes either a wandering spirit on Earth or in heaven with God. I would've told him how I admired his talent if he was still alive but was murdered when I was 10. I tried to get in contact with Phyllis but she passed away and the number was dead as I wanted to talk to her about him and how this effects me. Is there anyone out there that knows any of his surviving family members I can contact? I have lost alot of loved ones and some of their deaths were sudden. I hope someone can help me out. Im an actor too and Huffman inspired me to never give up.

Posted By Ralph : March 15, 2008 10:04 am

David Huffman always reminded me of the perfect-looking young leading men of 30s Hollywood drawing room films.  Similar to David Manners — perfect, thick hair, handsome face, beautifully dressed.  He and Keir Dullea could trade parts easily.I believe in helping people in distress, but some crimes should be left to the police.  David's actions were spontaneous, I know, but his bravery costed him his life.

Posted By Ralph : March 15, 2008 10:04 am

David Huffman always reminded me of the perfect-looking young leading men of 30s Hollywood drawing room films.  Similar to David Manners — perfect, thick hair, handsome face, beautifully dressed.  He and Keir Dullea could trade parts easily.I believe in helping people in distress, but some crimes should be left to the police.  David's actions were spontaneous, I know, but his bravery costed him his life.

Posted By Judy : April 17, 2008 10:07 pm

I developed a crush on him when I saw him in a TV (I think) movie.  I thought it was the Last Belles of Amberst.  Anyway, saw him in several things after that.  I lived in San Diego at the time and remember hearing on the radio that "Actor David Huffman" had been murdered.  I prayed it was not "MY" David Huffman. I was devastated he was killed and sickened that it was in my city.  I remember reading an article in the paper (I may still have it) that his license plate said "4daboys" or some similar wording.  For his two boys.  I was so heartbroken for his family.  I searched for info on him the first time I had internet access, and of course over the years, have seen more info than at first.  Thank you to this writer for giving me info that I had never read before.  I was again heartbroken when I read that Phyllis had died, leaving her 2 boys.

Posted By Judy : April 17, 2008 10:07 pm

I developed a crush on him when I saw him in a TV (I think) movie.  I thought it was the Last Belles of Amberst.  Anyway, saw him in several things after that.  I lived in San Diego at the time and remember hearing on the radio that "Actor David Huffman" had been murdered.  I prayed it was not "MY" David Huffman. I was devastated he was killed and sickened that it was in my city.  I remember reading an article in the paper (I may still have it) that his license plate said "4daboys" or some similar wording.  For his two boys.  I was so heartbroken for his family.  I searched for info on him the first time I had internet access, and of course over the years, have seen more info than at first.  Thank you to this writer for giving me info that I had never read before.  I was again heartbroken when I read that Phyllis had died, leaving her 2 boys.

Posted By Bob Newkirk : May 30, 2009 11:37 am

I knew David as I lived next to his aunt and uncle in Boulder Ill. David visited at least once sometimes twice a year and we got to know each other well. I remember one occassion, David was preparing for an upcoming role where he would play the bagpipes. instead of dubbing the music David learned to play the instrument himself. David walked over to my house knowing I was sleeping and began to play “Amazing Grace” outside my bedroom window until I awoke. Looking out the window, I was greeted by his beeming smile. I met his wife Phyllis and sons Matt and Phillip ot “Pip” as David called him. I treated them rides on my motorcycle and boat rides on Carlyle Lake.
I was shocked and deeply saddened by his murder and I have always missed him. He was a man of gentleness and total devotion to family and craft.
So impressed was I by this man, my first son was named in his honor.
David was later joined by his de3ar wife Phyllis who was in her own right a beutiful and talented lady
Matt and “Pip” I wish you well and the very best in life.
Sincerely – an old friend, Bob

Posted By Bob Newkirk : May 30, 2009 11:37 am

I knew David as I lived next to his aunt and uncle in Boulder Ill. David visited at least once sometimes twice a year and we got to know each other well. I remember one occassion, David was preparing for an upcoming role where he would play the bagpipes. instead of dubbing the music David learned to play the instrument himself. David walked over to my house knowing I was sleeping and began to play “Amazing Grace” outside my bedroom window until I awoke. Looking out the window, I was greeted by his beeming smile. I met his wife Phyllis and sons Matt and Phillip ot “Pip” as David called him. I treated them rides on my motorcycle and boat rides on Carlyle Lake.
I was shocked and deeply saddened by his murder and I have always missed him. He was a man of gentleness and total devotion to family and craft.
So impressed was I by this man, my first son was named in his honor.
David was later joined by his de3ar wife Phyllis who was in her own right a beutiful and talented lady
Matt and “Pip” I wish you well and the very best in life.
Sincerely – an old friend, Bob

Posted By medusamorlock : May 30, 2009 1:13 pm

Bob, what a lovely remembrance of your fallen friend. There was a special quality in David that touched so many of us, most of all you and everyone else who knew him in real life. The loss must have been nearly unbearable.

Thank you for sharing these memories with us. I know that we all join you in wishing David and Phyllis’ two children the very best.

Glad you found this article. Thanks again.

Posted By medusamorlock : May 30, 2009 1:13 pm

Bob, what a lovely remembrance of your fallen friend. There was a special quality in David that touched so many of us, most of all you and everyone else who knew him in real life. The loss must have been nearly unbearable.

Thank you for sharing these memories with us. I know that we all join you in wishing David and Phyllis’ two children the very best.

Glad you found this article. Thanks again.

Posted By Brian : November 11, 2009 10:04 am

Fucking idiot should have not chased after him, what a fucking retard. lol

Posted By Brian : November 11, 2009 10:04 am

Fucking idiot should have not chased after him, what a fucking retard. lol

Posted By medusamorlock : November 11, 2009 11:24 am

Brian, your comment is really out of line, and if you have read any of the other comments, you know that NOT doing anything would have been completely out of character for David Huffman.

I hope you can understand why I hate what you wrote.

Posted By medusamorlock : November 11, 2009 11:24 am

Brian, your comment is really out of line, and if you have read any of the other comments, you know that NOT doing anything would have been completely out of character for David Huffman.

I hope you can understand why I hate what you wrote.

Posted By Jim : January 13, 2010 3:40 pm

I was in the production of “Of Mice and Men” that David was starring in at the time of his death. I’ve thought of his gentle soul so many times since then – he was a truly good and decent man. I’m sorry now to have read that Phyllis is gone too. I only hope his boys have grown up to health and happiness as their father would want for them.

Posted By Jim : January 13, 2010 3:40 pm

I was in the production of “Of Mice and Men” that David was starring in at the time of his death. I’ve thought of his gentle soul so many times since then – he was a truly good and decent man. I’m sorry now to have read that Phyllis is gone too. I only hope his boys have grown up to health and happiness as their father would want for them.

Posted By arthur_bishop72 : January 16, 2010 7:17 pm

I’ve been watching St. Helens on and off since it was on TV in 1981 and loved his sincere performance in it. I finally found it a few years ago on DVD. I only found out today about what happened to David Huffman. I feel for his two boys and pray they are prospering and happy.

Brian, as someone with 2 young children, I can say with absolute certainty that I would blowtorch you militantly if I ever heard you utter those words in front of me.

Posted By arthur_bishop72 : January 16, 2010 7:17 pm

I’ve been watching St. Helens on and off since it was on TV in 1981 and loved his sincere performance in it. I finally found it a few years ago on DVD. I only found out today about what happened to David Huffman. I feel for his two boys and pray they are prospering and happy.

Brian, as someone with 2 young children, I can say with absolute certainty that I would blowtorch you militantly if I ever heard you utter those words in front of me.

Posted By Marilyn McCunn : January 24, 2010 10:29 pm

He was my cousin on my mother’s side in the Dippel family. We were so proud of David’s life and still miss him and Phyllis. We cherish the photos we have of him and his family taken in southern Illinois.

Posted By Marilyn McCunn : January 24, 2010 10:29 pm

He was my cousin on my mother’s side in the Dippel family. We were so proud of David’s life and still miss him and Phyllis. We cherish the photos we have of him and his family taken in southern Illinois.

Posted By Medusa : January 25, 2010 12:07 pm

I am continually gratified by the kind words and wonderful memories so many friends, family and fans have of David Huffman. Thanks for visiting.

Posted By Medusa : January 25, 2010 12:07 pm

I am continually gratified by the kind words and wonderful memories so many friends, family and fans have of David Huffman. Thanks for visiting.

Posted By james norris : January 27, 2010 10:24 pm

I worked with David on the 1984 production of “Children in the Crossfire”. David was the nicest person i have ever met and i still remember him fondly. Being from Ireland and only 14 years old at the time,David took me under his wing in the big smoke that is L.A. Words cannot describe how good a person he was, he was simply a gentleman. I am so honoured to have met David and the time we spent together and i will always cherish those memories forever..
Ps Brian you will never be half the man!!

Posted By james norris : January 27, 2010 10:24 pm

I worked with David on the 1984 production of “Children in the Crossfire”. David was the nicest person i have ever met and i still remember him fondly. Being from Ireland and only 14 years old at the time,David took me under his wing in the big smoke that is L.A. Words cannot describe how good a person he was, he was simply a gentleman. I am so honoured to have met David and the time we spent together and i will always cherish those memories forever..
Ps Brian you will never be half the man!!

Posted By Renee Ryan : February 27, 2010 6:36 pm

Does anyone know what part David was suppose to play in the mini-series “North and South” ??? I read that was his next job he was going to do but he was murdered.

Posted By Renee Ryan : February 27, 2010 6:36 pm

Does anyone know what part David was suppose to play in the mini-series “North and South” ??? I read that was his next job he was going to do but he was murdered.

Posted By hellesbelles : March 13, 2010 5:00 pm

I had often wondered what happened to David Huffman, and only recently discovered he had been murdered. It saddened me. I had a crush on him and thought he was going to be well known and lauded by his peers one day, only to have life and career cut short by someone who shouldn’t even have been in this country. Brian, to say that you’re a moron would be an insult to morons the world over, so suffice to say, you should look into having your brain wired into your mouth/fingers, before you ‘speak’ again. I just hope his wife and children led happy and productive lives and didn’t end like so many victim’s families, cast adrift by sudden, stupid violence.

Posted By hellesbelles : March 13, 2010 5:00 pm

I had often wondered what happened to David Huffman, and only recently discovered he had been murdered. It saddened me. I had a crush on him and thought he was going to be well known and lauded by his peers one day, only to have life and career cut short by someone who shouldn’t even have been in this country. Brian, to say that you’re a moron would be an insult to morons the world over, so suffice to say, you should look into having your brain wired into your mouth/fingers, before you ‘speak’ again. I just hope his wife and children led happy and productive lives and didn’t end like so many victim’s families, cast adrift by sudden, stupid violence.

Posted By sugar xyler : April 21, 2010 9:42 pm

I NOTICED DAVID’S ANGEL FACE THE FIRST TIME ON TELEVISION IN THE 70′S.HE LOOKED SO SWEET.GLAD TO KNOW HE WAS THAT WAY IN LIFE.I HAVE REALLY MISSED NOT SEEING HIM OVER THE YEARS.HE AND MY RAUL JULIA HAD ONE OF THE BEST SMILES EVER CAPTURED ON FILM.I HAD A MAJOR CRUSH ON DAVID FOR TWO DECADES AND WOULD HAVE LOVED TO HAVE MET MR. HUFFMAN. RAUL THOUGHT WELL OF DAVID’S WIFE,PHYLLIS AND SAID SHE WAS A VERY KIND PERSON.I AM VERY SAD THAT THEY BOTH ARE NO LONGER HERE.I THINK OF THEIR SON’S ON FATHER’S DAY AND WISH THEM PEACE AND COMFORT ALWAYS FOR I NEVER HAD A FATHER AND WOULD HAVE LOVED TO HAVE HAD SOMEONE LIKE DAVID FOR A DAD.

Posted By sugar xyler : April 21, 2010 9:42 pm

I NOTICED DAVID’S ANGEL FACE THE FIRST TIME ON TELEVISION IN THE 70′S.HE LOOKED SO SWEET.GLAD TO KNOW HE WAS THAT WAY IN LIFE.I HAVE REALLY MISSED NOT SEEING HIM OVER THE YEARS.HE AND MY RAUL JULIA HAD ONE OF THE BEST SMILES EVER CAPTURED ON FILM.I HAD A MAJOR CRUSH ON DAVID FOR TWO DECADES AND WOULD HAVE LOVED TO HAVE MET MR. HUFFMAN. RAUL THOUGHT WELL OF DAVID’S WIFE,PHYLLIS AND SAID SHE WAS A VERY KIND PERSON.I AM VERY SAD THAT THEY BOTH ARE NO LONGER HERE.I THINK OF THEIR SON’S ON FATHER’S DAY AND WISH THEM PEACE AND COMFORT ALWAYS FOR I NEVER HAD A FATHER AND WOULD HAVE LOVED TO HAVE HAD SOMEONE LIKE DAVID FOR A DAD.

Posted By SUGAR XYLER : April 21, 2010 9:48 pm

ALSO, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS WONDERFUL ARTICLE ON DAVID HUFFMAN!IT WAS ABOUT TIME HE WAS GIVEN SOME SPACE ON THE NET!!

Posted By SUGAR XYLER : April 21, 2010 9:48 pm

ALSO, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS WONDERFUL ARTICLE ON DAVID HUFFMAN!IT WAS ABOUT TIME HE WAS GIVEN SOME SPACE ON THE NET!!

Posted By Medusa : April 22, 2010 1:42 pm

I recently caught a David Huffman appearance in the TV movie “Amelia Earhart” starring Susan Clark and John Forsythe. He played a radio operator who kept trying to contact the plane after they’d lost contact with it, and he had quite a nice scene at the end. It ran on one of the Encore Channels, so keep an eye out for it. He’s in the later part of the movie.

Thanks also to everyone for their continued interest in David Huffman. He is well remembered for his life and his talent.

Posted By Medusa : April 22, 2010 1:42 pm

I recently caught a David Huffman appearance in the TV movie “Amelia Earhart” starring Susan Clark and John Forsythe. He played a radio operator who kept trying to contact the plane after they’d lost contact with it, and he had quite a nice scene at the end. It ran on one of the Encore Channels, so keep an eye out for it. He’s in the later part of the movie.

Thanks also to everyone for their continued interest in David Huffman. He is well remembered for his life and his talent.

Posted By Ernie Neer : May 1, 2010 1:24 pm

David was my one of my 1st cousins, well by marriage, but where I come from that makes him my 1st cousin. We were visiting his folks in southern Illinois and drove in to St Louis to see “Butterflies are Free” with Gloria Swanson. I still remember him fondly.

Posted By Ernie Neer : May 1, 2010 1:24 pm

David was my one of my 1st cousins, well by marriage, but where I come from that makes him my 1st cousin. We were visiting his folks in southern Illinois and drove in to St Louis to see “Butterflies are Free” with Gloria Swanson. I still remember him fondly.

Posted By Dan Flanders : July 4, 2010 10:41 pm

I had the pleasure with working with David on the made for TV movie
F Scott Fitzgerald and the Last of the Belles and spent quite a bit of time with him during the filming in Savannah, Ga.. He was absolutely the nicest guy you would ever meet. You would never know he was an accomplished actor because he treated everyone as a friend. It was a ppleasure to have known him and counted him as my friend and his untimely death is so unfair. God Bless You David

Posted By Dan Flanders : July 4, 2010 10:41 pm

I had the pleasure with working with David on the made for TV movie
F Scott Fitzgerald and the Last of the Belles and spent quite a bit of time with him during the filming in Savannah, Ga.. He was absolutely the nicest guy you would ever meet. You would never know he was an accomplished actor because he treated everyone as a friend. It was a ppleasure to have known him and counted him as my friend and his untimely death is so unfair. God Bless You David

Posted By medusamorlock : July 5, 2010 10:08 am

Once again, thanks to Dan and all who have shared memories of this extraordinary young man who touched us all with his talent and grace. We’re all clearly still thinking about him and that is testimony that continues to live on.

Thanks again to all who have found this article and responded.

- Medusa

Posted By medusamorlock : July 5, 2010 10:08 am

Once again, thanks to Dan and all who have shared memories of this extraordinary young man who touched us all with his talent and grace. We’re all clearly still thinking about him and that is testimony that continues to live on.

Thanks again to all who have found this article and responded.

- Medusa

Posted By Fiona : October 22, 2010 1:02 pm

What a beautiful tribute to David Huffman. I am proud to own a copy of “Testimony of Two Men” and he is always a delight to watch. May his fans, friends and relatives take comfort in knowing the vast majority of people admired his courage and that he was a good man.

Posted By Fiona : October 22, 2010 1:02 pm

What a beautiful tribute to David Huffman. I am proud to own a copy of “Testimony of Two Men” and he is always a delight to watch. May his fans, friends and relatives take comfort in knowing the vast majority of people admired his courage and that he was a good man.

Posted By FanofDavid : November 5, 2010 11:20 am

David was a close family friend. I spent most of my formative years with the Huffman family and often thought of David as a father when my own father was often absent. He was the kindest, brightest and most welcoming soul and approached life with a vigor that was an inspiration to all. The loss of David was devastating to his family and friends. His absence is felt particularly strongly now with the loss of Phyllis. His boys are beautiful young men with a wonderful combination of David’s influential kindness and vigorous approach to life. Thank you for writing this tribute Medusamorlock.

Posted By FanofDavid : November 5, 2010 11:20 am

David was a close family friend. I spent most of my formative years with the Huffman family and often thought of David as a father when my own father was often absent. He was the kindest, brightest and most welcoming soul and approached life with a vigor that was an inspiration to all. The loss of David was devastating to his family and friends. His absence is felt particularly strongly now with the loss of Phyllis. His boys are beautiful young men with a wonderful combination of David’s influential kindness and vigorous approach to life. Thank you for writing this tribute Medusamorlock.

Posted By Ed : February 4, 2011 9:40 pm

Why don’t you mention the name of the coward who killed him in your article?

Posted By Ed : February 4, 2011 9:40 pm

Why don’t you mention the name of the coward who killed him in your article?

Posted By Ed : February 4, 2011 9:47 pm

His name is Genaro Samano Villanueva and he gets out very soon. 26 years was his sentence. He was 16 at time.

A good man gets killed and soon his killer will be out as his deed has been paid for. Wow.

Posted By Ed : February 4, 2011 9:47 pm

His name is Genaro Samano Villanueva and he gets out very soon. 26 years was his sentence. He was 16 at time.

A good man gets killed and soon his killer will be out as his deed has been paid for. Wow.

Posted By medusamorlock : February 5, 2011 10:55 am

Hi Ed.

I am glad you mentioned that David’s killer gets out soon. It’s shocking that it’s been so long since the murder, and how to reconcile that Villanueva will be free and still relatively young? Nothing could have brought Huffman back, and in retrospect the sentence sounds too short but perhaps they were in some way considering the Villanueva’s age, which seems irrelevant when such a horrendous and brutal crime has been committed.

It’s rotten all the way around, but as we know here from the comments from those who knew David and those who loved him as an actor, David Huffman’s memory lives on strongly and positively. He was truly one of the special ones.

Posted By medusamorlock : February 5, 2011 10:55 am

Hi Ed.

I am glad you mentioned that David’s killer gets out soon. It’s shocking that it’s been so long since the murder, and how to reconcile that Villanueva will be free and still relatively young? Nothing could have brought Huffman back, and in retrospect the sentence sounds too short but perhaps they were in some way considering the Villanueva’s age, which seems irrelevant when such a horrendous and brutal crime has been committed.

It’s rotten all the way around, but as we know here from the comments from those who knew David and those who loved him as an actor, David Huffman’s memory lives on strongly and positively. He was truly one of the special ones.

Posted By Austin : February 20, 2011 10:44 am

I was sadden a few years ago to read that David had died. I visited Mt. St. Helens in 78′ when I was only 4 years old. I remember watching the move over and over as I was remember camping there. I loved this movie so much I studied geology as a undergraduate and later got my doctorate in volcanology. I still watch the movie often and I’m sadden to think he died so young. What is even more sad is to think his killer is already out of prison.

Posted By Austin : February 20, 2011 10:44 am

I was sadden a few years ago to read that David had died. I visited Mt. St. Helens in 78′ when I was only 4 years old. I remember watching the move over and over as I was remember camping there. I loved this movie so much I studied geology as a undergraduate and later got my doctorate in volcanology. I still watch the movie often and I’m sadden to think he died so young. What is even more sad is to think his killer is already out of prison.

Posted By Kathy in San Diego : February 27, 2011 6:47 pm

David Huffman was my favorite actor. I was devastated when I learned, 26 years ago, that he had been murdered in the park where I work. This has haunted me all of these years. He had been performing at the Old Globe Theater here in Balboa Park, and I didn’t even know it.

The day he died, the weather was beautiful, and I went for a walk down the Prado. Oh, how I wish I could have seen him and stopped him. He was a good man just trying to help someone he didn’t even know. He did not deserve this.

About 10 days later, there was a benefit/memorial performance of “Of Mice and Men.” Larry Drake gave the most memorable, powerful, gut-wrenching performance. The cast was very professional. It must have been extremely difficult.

I was sad to read in these posts that Phyllis has died also. I hope their sons live well into old age. I wish them good health and happiness. They’ve seen enough tragedy.

Posted By Kathy in San Diego : February 27, 2011 6:47 pm

David Huffman was my favorite actor. I was devastated when I learned, 26 years ago, that he had been murdered in the park where I work. This has haunted me all of these years. He had been performing at the Old Globe Theater here in Balboa Park, and I didn’t even know it.

The day he died, the weather was beautiful, and I went for a walk down the Prado. Oh, how I wish I could have seen him and stopped him. He was a good man just trying to help someone he didn’t even know. He did not deserve this.

About 10 days later, there was a benefit/memorial performance of “Of Mice and Men.” Larry Drake gave the most memorable, powerful, gut-wrenching performance. The cast was very professional. It must have been extremely difficult.

I was sad to read in these posts that Phyllis has died also. I hope their sons live well into old age. I wish them good health and happiness. They’ve seen enough tragedy.

Posted By Lori : March 17, 2011 3:00 pm

Thank you for writing this beautiful memorial for David. I had such a crush on him after watching “Testimony of Two Men”. It’s hard for me to believe it’s been so long ago. It sickens me that someone could take a man’s life and receive only 26 years in prison. It’s a travesty.
I’m thankful that he will be ever young on film.

Posted By Lori : March 17, 2011 3:00 pm

Thank you for writing this beautiful memorial for David. I had such a crush on him after watching “Testimony of Two Men”. It’s hard for me to believe it’s been so long ago. It sickens me that someone could take a man’s life and receive only 26 years in prison. It’s a travesty.
I’m thankful that he will be ever young on film.

Posted By Medusa Morlock : March 17, 2011 6:15 pm

I will always think of him as the brave volcanologist in “St. Helens” — David surely lives on in his work and those of us who admired him will never forget his talent and his bravery and kindness.

Thanks again to everybody who reads and comments on this — I’m always so pleased that David is remembered.

-medusa

Posted By Medusa Morlock : March 17, 2011 6:15 pm

I will always think of him as the brave volcanologist in “St. Helens” — David surely lives on in his work and those of us who admired him will never forget his talent and his bravery and kindness.

Thanks again to everybody who reads and comments on this — I’m always so pleased that David is remembered.

-medusa

Posted By molly stark : April 1, 2011 12:31 pm

I played Fraulein Schneider in a touring summer production of “Cabaret” He played Cliff.He was a meticulous actor and a cut-up as well.Before I delivered my line to him:WELCOME to BERLIN, He faced me with crossed eyes and face that absolutely broke me up.The cast ,including his wife Phylis,spent many fun hours a day around the pool in Framingham while performing at night.I am so glad for his success and so sad to know about his death.A lovely young couple left this earth too soon.

Posted By molly stark : April 1, 2011 12:31 pm

I played Fraulein Schneider in a touring summer production of “Cabaret” He played Cliff.He was a meticulous actor and a cut-up as well.Before I delivered my line to him:WELCOME to BERLIN, He faced me with crossed eyes and face that absolutely broke me up.The cast ,including his wife Phylis,spent many fun hours a day around the pool in Framingham while performing at night.I am so glad for his success and so sad to know about his death.A lovely young couple left this earth too soon.

Posted By medusamorlock : April 1, 2011 5:46 pm

Wonderful memories, molly, of David and his wife. His was definitely a special life and career cut too short. What is so touching is that he is alive in so many people’s thoughts.

Thanks very much for commenting here.

xoxox medusa

Posted By medusamorlock : April 1, 2011 5:46 pm

Wonderful memories, molly, of David and his wife. His was definitely a special life and career cut too short. What is so touching is that he is alive in so many people’s thoughts.

Thanks very much for commenting here.

xoxox medusa

Posted By Roger : April 2, 2011 12:56 am

Thank you for writing such a wonderful tribute to an actor taken too young. I watched “Ice Castles” this evening and decided to look up some of the cast. I was shocked to discover that David Huffman had been murdered so many years ago. I was angered by the fact that his killer is now walking the streets as a free man. There seems to be little justice in freeing a man who so easily took the life of another. Besides being a talented actor, David was also someone’s husband and father. I am glad that he lives on in his films and in the memories of those who knew him.

Posted By Roger : April 2, 2011 12:56 am

Thank you for writing such a wonderful tribute to an actor taken too young. I watched “Ice Castles” this evening and decided to look up some of the cast. I was shocked to discover that David Huffman had been murdered so many years ago. I was angered by the fact that his killer is now walking the streets as a free man. There seems to be little justice in freeing a man who so easily took the life of another. Besides being a talented actor, David was also someone’s husband and father. I am glad that he lives on in his films and in the memories of those who knew him.

Posted By Unclelooney : June 7, 2011 11:16 am

http://www.encyclopediadubuque.org/images/thumb/d/df/Imp196.jpg/350px-Imp196.jpg

Dubuque Iowa’s Walk Of Fame Sidewalk-The cast of FIST.
David’s is second from the bottom.

Posted By Unclelooney : June 7, 2011 11:16 am

http://www.encyclopediadubuque.org/images/thumb/d/df/Imp196.jpg/350px-Imp196.jpg

Dubuque Iowa’s Walk Of Fame Sidewalk-The cast of FIST.
David’s is second from the bottom.

Posted By Susan : October 24, 2011 6:35 pm

Recenty watch St. Helens again and was reminded of what a good actor David was. I wondered what had happened to him and found this site today. The story of how his life ended was very sad. He was a hero and that is a rare quality in life today. Kudos to Clint Eastwood in helping his widow out. May his boys take comfort in their fathers short but well lived life.

Posted By Susan : October 24, 2011 6:35 pm

Recenty watch St. Helens again and was reminded of what a good actor David was. I wondered what had happened to him and found this site today. The story of how his life ended was very sad. He was a hero and that is a rare quality in life today. Kudos to Clint Eastwood in helping his widow out. May his boys take comfort in their fathers short but well lived life.

Posted By Ugly Bug : December 23, 2011 7:50 pm

Thank you for this lovely tribute. I grew up in San Diego and was studying theatre in 1985. I attended David Huffman’s second to last performance in Of Mice and Men. He really stood out, with his good looks and beautiful voice. As you say, we were all shocked when the news broke about his death. I didn’t think I’d find anything on the internet about it, so finding this means a lot.

Posted By Ugly Bug : December 23, 2011 7:50 pm

Thank you for this lovely tribute. I grew up in San Diego and was studying theatre in 1985. I attended David Huffman’s second to last performance in Of Mice and Men. He really stood out, with his good looks and beautiful voice. As you say, we were all shocked when the news broke about his death. I didn’t think I’d find anything on the internet about it, so finding this means a lot.

Posted By E. Austin : January 8, 2012 1:44 am

I was on one of my what ever happened to crusades when I read the tragic news about David Huffman. He was great in Ice Castles one of my favorite movies and the way he died was both heroic and tragic..While I was reading these letters unfortunately I ran into Brians’ note. What can you say about an ungodly un feeling idiot like Brian. I hope if you ever need someone even though you are an unmentionable name, hopefully some one will be there to help you. What a piece of work…People like you ruin my country, get out of it. EA

Posted By E. Austin : January 8, 2012 1:44 am

I was on one of my what ever happened to crusades when I read the tragic news about David Huffman. He was great in Ice Castles one of my favorite movies and the way he died was both heroic and tragic..While I was reading these letters unfortunately I ran into Brians’ note. What can you say about an ungodly un feeling idiot like Brian. I hope if you ever need someone even though you are an unmentionable name, hopefully some one will be there to help you. What a piece of work…People like you ruin my country, get out of it. EA

Posted By Medusa : January 8, 2012 12:32 pm

Thanks to everybody for continuing to honor David Huffman’s memory by coming here and commenting on this article from several years ago. He was a tremendous actor and great and honorable person.

-medusa morlock

Posted By Medusa : January 8, 2012 12:32 pm

Thanks to everybody for continuing to honor David Huffman’s memory by coming here and commenting on this article from several years ago. He was a tremendous actor and great and honorable person.

-medusa morlock

Posted By Nancy : January 8, 2012 9:34 pm

I just watched Ice Castles tonight, a favorite movie from my childhood. I had no idea that David had been murdered. So very sad. I am sickened that his murderer now gets to enjoy the remainder of his life. How unfair.

Posted By Nancy : January 8, 2012 9:34 pm

I just watched Ice Castles tonight, a favorite movie from my childhood. I had no idea that David had been murdered. So very sad. I am sickened that his murderer now gets to enjoy the remainder of his life. How unfair.

Posted By Virginia : February 24, 2012 6:50 am

Thank you so much for this article! I’m so glad someone has kept the memory of such a wonderful actor alive! I, too, had a crush on David Huffman, and couldn’t watch movies of his for years afterwards.

I remember his amazing performance in “Of Mice and Men”, and then hearing how he had passed. . .it took my breath away that something so terrible could happen to someone so wonderful. It saddens me to know that his widow has passed as well.

Is there any indication that his murderer is out of prison at this time? Do you happen to know what his sons do for a living?

Thanks again for a great article!!

Virginia

Posted By Virginia : February 24, 2012 6:50 am

Thank you so much for this article! I’m so glad someone has kept the memory of such a wonderful actor alive! I, too, had a crush on David Huffman, and couldn’t watch movies of his for years afterwards.

I remember his amazing performance in “Of Mice and Men”, and then hearing how he had passed. . .it took my breath away that something so terrible could happen to someone so wonderful. It saddens me to know that his widow has passed as well.

Is there any indication that his murderer is out of prison at this time? Do you happen to know what his sons do for a living?

Thanks again for a great article!!

Virginia

Posted By Tina Tuell : March 9, 2012 11:31 pm

I just found out yesterday, that David Huffman was dead. And to find out that he was murdered,I just can’t believe it.I LOVED him in ICE CASTLES.And Little House on the Prairie.He was very HANDSOME,and a great actor.One of my Favorites.He was a “REAL” Man, he died being a HERO.And to YOU,BRIAN you are a COWARD!!!!!!!A TRUE man will do the RIGHT thing even if it cost’s him his life.IT’s MORE HONORABLE to get killed doing the RIGHT thing than doing the WRONG thing.RIP David Huffman.

Posted By Tina Tuell : March 9, 2012 11:31 pm

I just found out yesterday, that David Huffman was dead. And to find out that he was murdered,I just can’t believe it.I LOVED him in ICE CASTLES.And Little House on the Prairie.He was very HANDSOME,and a great actor.One of my Favorites.He was a “REAL” Man, he died being a HERO.And to YOU,BRIAN you are a COWARD!!!!!!!A TRUE man will do the RIGHT thing even if it cost’s him his life.IT’s MORE HONORABLE to get killed doing the RIGHT thing than doing the WRONG thing.RIP David Huffman.

Posted By Jane : March 16, 2012 12:40 pm

As someone mentioned above, I was just in one of my whatever happened to moods today and was thinking about David Huffman. He was a favorite of mine in the 70s/80s, developed a crush when I saw him in “The Last of the Belles,” and especially loved him in “Testimony of Two Men.” I was so shocked and saddened to learn what happened to him. He obviously was a wonderful human being too.

Posted By Jane : March 16, 2012 12:40 pm

As someone mentioned above, I was just in one of my whatever happened to moods today and was thinking about David Huffman. He was a favorite of mine in the 70s/80s, developed a crush when I saw him in “The Last of the Belles,” and especially loved him in “Testimony of Two Men.” I was so shocked and saddened to learn what happened to him. He obviously was a wonderful human being too.

Posted By tom jones : June 4, 2012 1:39 pm

they should have fried that murdering mexican for killing david but there is no justice in this country, its up to davids family to eliminate that coward.

Posted By tom jones : June 4, 2012 1:39 pm

they should have fried that murdering mexican for killing david but there is no justice in this country, its up to davids family to eliminate that coward.

Posted By Theresa : June 28, 2012 10:22 pm

I just found out TODAY about David Huffman’s brutal and senseless murder! I had no idea; even though he’s always been one of my favorite actors. Handsome, charismatic and very talented. I’ve been searching in earnest for a copy of Testimony of Two Men because I have worn out the VHS copy I taped from TV so many years ago! That is how I happened upon this article. How awful. Let’s continue to give cruddy illegal immigrants (lovely mexicans) free reign over this country to come here and do whatever they please. They all need to be shipped out of here on a one way passage and as for the creep that murdered such a beautiful and talented man; he should not be free – he should be stabbed and tortured to death. Let the dirtbag see what it feels like to die like that. But no, we not only gave him 3 hots and a cot for 22 years; we let him go FREE! Now he can go out and cause more pain and heartache. Perhaps, if we’re lucky – someone will murder him before he has a chance to ruin anyone else’s life! As for Brian, I hope you meet up with him someday.

Rest in Peace David.

Posted By Theresa : June 28, 2012 10:22 pm

I just found out TODAY about David Huffman’s brutal and senseless murder! I had no idea; even though he’s always been one of my favorite actors. Handsome, charismatic and very talented. I’ve been searching in earnest for a copy of Testimony of Two Men because I have worn out the VHS copy I taped from TV so many years ago! That is how I happened upon this article. How awful. Let’s continue to give cruddy illegal immigrants (lovely mexicans) free reign over this country to come here and do whatever they please. They all need to be shipped out of here on a one way passage and as for the creep that murdered such a beautiful and talented man; he should not be free – he should be stabbed and tortured to death. Let the dirtbag see what it feels like to die like that. But no, we not only gave him 3 hots and a cot for 22 years; we let him go FREE! Now he can go out and cause more pain and heartache. Perhaps, if we’re lucky – someone will murder him before he has a chance to ruin anyone else’s life! As for Brian, I hope you meet up with him someday.

Rest in Peace David.

Posted By robert in Little Rock : August 24, 2012 12:53 am

I just watched Firefox. David is amazing. Such a nice all round guy that most of would love to be like him. It’s little wonder that Clint helped his wife after her loss. I think Clint would have very impressed working with David in the movie and became great friends

Thanks David for your talent and being the great guy we all admire so much.

Posted By robert in Little Rock : August 24, 2012 12:53 am

I just watched Firefox. David is amazing. Such a nice all round guy that most of would love to be like him. It’s little wonder that Clint helped his wife after her loss. I think Clint would have very impressed working with David in the movie and became great friends

Thanks David for your talent and being the great guy we all admire so much.

Posted By Bob in Illinois : October 13, 2012 11:23 am

I met David in the mid 70′s while he was on visit with his uncle Chic and Aunt Fern. Later after a stint in the Navy I again met him as I lived next door to these relations. This time David and I became fast and lasting friends. Every time he visited we either went to work on his Mothers house or went on an adventure.
Later as the boys got older, they were included on these adventures. Sweet Phyllis remained behind as to not interfere with the boy stuff. One of my favorite memories, David was just learning to play the bag pipes, ealy one morning the most God awfull sound was just outside my bedroom window, parting the curtains, there with that beaming smile on his face was David pumping the bag and playing “Amazing Grace”. Priceless.
Hearing of Davids murder I was shocked to the point of tears. And I have missed him dearly. When my son was born he was named David Michael in tribute and celebration of my good friend. God bless Davis and Phyllis. I’d love to hear from Matt, and Pip as David referred to them. Thanks fro the memories David. Your friend always Bob N.

Posted By Bob in Illinois : October 13, 2012 11:23 am

I met David in the mid 70′s while he was on visit with his uncle Chic and Aunt Fern. Later after a stint in the Navy I again met him as I lived next door to these relations. This time David and I became fast and lasting friends. Every time he visited we either went to work on his Mothers house or went on an adventure.
Later as the boys got older, they were included on these adventures. Sweet Phyllis remained behind as to not interfere with the boy stuff. One of my favorite memories, David was just learning to play the bag pipes, ealy one morning the most God awfull sound was just outside my bedroom window, parting the curtains, there with that beaming smile on his face was David pumping the bag and playing “Amazing Grace”. Priceless.
Hearing of Davids murder I was shocked to the point of tears. And I have missed him dearly. When my son was born he was named David Michael in tribute and celebration of my good friend. God bless Davis and Phyllis. I’d love to hear from Matt, and Pip as David referred to them. Thanks fro the memories David. Your friend always Bob N.

Posted By Patrick : November 9, 2012 9:23 pm

Man I can’t believe this happened! I just found out this moment!!!
I was in a film with him in 1979, I was an animal trainer and was taking a break from training and loafing on movie sets as an extra or what ever work I could get…. I just found the film on line and bought it, my family and I watched it tonight and I got curious on where everyone was! I lot can happen over 30 some years but I never expected to find this out! David was a great actor and was very personal and kind to me while on set, the times we did talk …… So sorry my prayers go out to all his family!!!

Pat

Posted By Patrick : November 9, 2012 9:23 pm

Man I can’t believe this happened! I just found out this moment!!!
I was in a film with him in 1979, I was an animal trainer and was taking a break from training and loafing on movie sets as an extra or what ever work I could get…. I just found the film on line and bought it, my family and I watched it tonight and I got curious on where everyone was! I lot can happen over 30 some years but I never expected to find this out! David was a great actor and was very personal and kind to me while on set, the times we did talk …… So sorry my prayers go out to all his family!!!

Pat

Posted By Tom : December 3, 2012 9:34 pm

I had heard about this tragedy many years ago and was so saddened that this happened to such a wonderful person. Thank you for setting up this site for David to be remembered. I was in college with David at St. Ambrose in Davenport, Iowa in the mid-60′s. I was not much of an actor – no – actually, I was a really lousey actor – but David convinced me to try out for several plays and actually was cast in a few of them. I still wasn’t much of an actor – but, through his kindness, I met a whole bunch of really great people. I also have to say that he was the most kind, considerate, caring human being I had ever met and he helped me see a valuable person inside of myself. That was no acting; that was the real David Huffman. I hope to live my life in a way that, one day, I can meet up with him again and thank him for all he did for a sort of lost on his own college student. I hope his children read this and know what a great, great person their dad was – even as a college student.

Tom

Posted By Tom : December 3, 2012 9:34 pm

I had heard about this tragedy many years ago and was so saddened that this happened to such a wonderful person. Thank you for setting up this site for David to be remembered. I was in college with David at St. Ambrose in Davenport, Iowa in the mid-60′s. I was not much of an actor – no – actually, I was a really lousey actor – but David convinced me to try out for several plays and actually was cast in a few of them. I still wasn’t much of an actor – but, through his kindness, I met a whole bunch of really great people. I also have to say that he was the most kind, considerate, caring human being I had ever met and he helped me see a valuable person inside of myself. That was no acting; that was the real David Huffman. I hope to live my life in a way that, one day, I can meet up with him again and thank him for all he did for a sort of lost on his own college student. I hope his children read this and know what a great, great person their dad was – even as a college student.

Tom

Posted By SUGAR XYLER : January 6, 2013 10:02 pm

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW DAVID WOULD HAVE LOOKED AS HE AGED CHECK OUT THE BEAUTIFUL ACTOR RUPERT GRAVES.

Posted By SUGAR XYLER : January 6, 2013 10:02 pm

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW DAVID WOULD HAVE LOOKED AS HE AGED CHECK OUT THE BEAUTIFUL ACTOR RUPERT GRAVES.

Posted By Tom Norpell : April 5, 2013 3:22 pm

Hello,

Your site is wonderful and inspired me to write about David. He was my best friend when we were becoming teenagers. I sat down to recollect some memories of David and they just kept surfacing. But now I have 1,900 words. Is that too long to post/contribute?

Thank you,
Tom

Posted By Tom Norpell : April 5, 2013 3:22 pm

Hello,

Your site is wonderful and inspired me to write about David. He was my best friend when we were becoming teenagers. I sat down to recollect some memories of David and they just kept surfacing. But now I have 1,900 words. Is that too long to post/contribute?

Thank you,
Tom

Posted By Tom Norpell : April 9, 2013 10:11 am

David and I met as classmates at the Catholic grammar school in Downers Grove, Illinois we attended in the 1950s. I knew him from the earliest grades, but by seventh grade we had become the best of friends. He lived on the north side of town and I lived on the south side, way south, where my dentist father had bought a home on three acres he dubbed “Tooth Acres.” Farm fields long past their productive years surrounded our home—some then transforming into subdivisions—and beyond these, acres of native woodlands. It was just the sort of environment a couple of newly minted teenagers would love to roam. It was apparent early on that David and I shared a great pleasure in just hanging out in the natural world.

One of our frequent stops was an old, abandoned house where we had gained entry through a basement window out of view of the neighbors. All its modest, vintage furnishings were still in place, including an upright piano. The kitchen cabinets were stacked with plates and glassware; the dressers were stuffed with dark clothes whose woolly odor I can clearly recall; and the small attic was crammed with traveler’s trunks and glass kerosene lanterns from before the household went electric. It looked like its inhabitants suddenly up and left decades previously, leaving everything behind just as it was. In the attic’s wooden trunks we found old letters and books written in German. We discovered sepia photos and tintype images, some of which had been artistically painted over to serve as family portraits. Soon we were piecing together fragments of the Heinke’s lives to arrive at a composite picture. Why they abandoned their home was a mystery David liked to ponder by creating endless scenarios about what may have happened to them. I mistakenly shared the location of our mystery house to others in the neighborhood, and on my 13th birthday someone burned the house down. The boy we all suspected of torching it would later become a psychologist.

On special Saturdays, David’s father drove us to one of several forest preserves. Dad took solitary walks or sat in his car listening to the Cubs game while David and I explored the woods and waterways. David often brought his old flintlock rifle with him, one whose hammer had partially broken off. The only way to cock it was to set the butt on the ground and push the hammer back with one’s shoe. All this for a cheap little click when you pulled the trigger. Sometimes we battled Indians; sometimes we fought Nazis. Though we were growing out of such child’s play, David played his parts with gusto. His sound effects of rifle bursts and explosions were among the best I ever heard. On the way home he would lean forward in his seat at some point, turn to me and pronounce enthusiastically, “Some fun, eh Tom?”

David and I were friends at a time when our young bodies were getting their first surge of testosterone. We spent many an overnight in my “clubhouse” discussing the mysteries of girls and the mechanics of making out with them. (I had saved gift and allowance money to a whopping $119.00 which my dad used to purchase a small utility building set at the edge of our property that came to be known as my clubhouse). Early on, the clubhouse was fashioned into a tiny church where I’d say mass for my father. Playing priest was great fun. I painted a Hopalong Cassidy lunchbox gold and stood it on end to serve as my tabernacle. I flattened circles of Wonder Bread with my Mom’s steam iron to turn them into communion hosts. Dad often attended my masses, patiently listening to my sermon on St. Blaise, a Catholic Bishop in the third century who performed a miraculous cure on a little boy who had a fish bone stuck in his throat. With prayer, the bone disappeared. It was the only sermon I knew, and my father must have heard it dozens of times.

By the time David and I were becoming good buddies my little church gave way to a clubhouse, a kind of pubescent boy’s cave where we retreated to smoke cigarettes and further ponder the mysteries of girls and sex, and issue updates on our public hair growth. Public hair was one of our great concerns at the time. David wore a jock strap under his Jockey shorts every day. He said it made him sweat down there, and, like watering a garden, it made his pubes grow faster.

David and I shared the dubious distinction of having been simultaneously undressed by one of the nuns at St. Joseph’s Grammar School. The incident began when $11.00 in cash brought in by Paulette Zap to pay her yearly uniform rental fee for the short-sleeved white blouse and blue pleated skirt the girls wore every day. But the money was missing when Paulette returned from recess and thus began Sister’s mission to cajole the stolen money into her pocket. Sister’s prelude of hell-fire damnation and the special places in hell reserved for thieves preceded her handing out little envelopes for the thief to return the money. When no money came back, Sister sent them out again. This time I got David’s attention and slipped a blank piece of paper into my envelope in what was a lame attempt to make a joke. Again, no money was returned. But in the Gestapo atmosphere that was a Catholic Grammar School in the 1950s, somebody obviously turned us in to Sister.

After noon recess, David and I were called into the hallway to be escorted by the Music Sister to her first floor music room, a space just large enough for a baby grand and Sister’s small desk. Sister directed us to opposite corners of the room and proceeded to order us to remove our clothes one article at a time. It was the first time in my life I experienced a surreal decoupling from reality. Sister examined each item of clothing until David and me were down to our underpants, the outside of which she gave a quick frisk for the little wad of paper money. Finding no money, we were ordered to dress. We returned to the classroom, no doubt flushed with shame (Catholic logic: when violated, feel shame, not outrage). We told our parents about the incident that evening and they talked to one another before calling the Sister’s convent to demand an explanation. Somehow the wily nuns were able to mollify our parents’ anger and soon the incident was behind us. For me, it was one of those many experiences that made me the Recovering Catholic that I am to this day.

Dave was always up for a new adventure. Sometime during the summer between seventh and eighth grade, he took me to the Candy Castle on north Main Street. I had been there many times shopping for penny candy, gag gifts or a new Halloween mask. The classic gags were all there: palm buzzers, fake vomit, fake dog poop, whoopee cushions and hundreds of other amusements, all designed to make you laugh and make others cringe. Confections and novelties occupied the front half of the long, narrow store. The rear half was another world entirely—scary for me, compelling for David—a land of dark mahogany booths where the owner served Cherry Cokes and Green Rivers to his special clientele: the hoods of Downers Grove Community High School. They sat with their girl friends in a fog of cigarette smoke, a twilight world dimly illuminated by the diffuse, gaudy light of a jukebox playing Elvis and Fabian continuously. A forbidden place for me, David convinced me to cross the line and take a booth, he leading the way with all the aplomb of a real hood. Before we went in, David stopped to roll the ends of his short-sleeved shirt up a couple times to impart the correct hoody look, which complimented his Hollywood haircut—long on the sides topped by a flattop. It was another disassociation for me, though, as I sat in this foreign land. David casually tamped his Lucky Strike on the tabletop and opened his Zippo with a sharp snap, then languidly formed perfect smoke rings, I sucked my Green River dry in moments and then pleaded, “So, are we ready to go now?” David was in no hurry. He lingered in the role that came to life in that atmosphere, that staging, of the Candy Castle.

When my older sister married just before I started eighth grade, she asked me to select my best friend to be her altar boys for her wedding mass. Naturally, I selected David. My sister still has the film-to-video record of the ceremony showing glimpses of David and me serving mass. I took the Book and he took the Bells—shorthand for the two distinct series of duties of an altar boy serving mass. But in that final year of grammar school our friendship ebbed. Truth is, the uncoupling may have started with our becoming rivals when we both tried to win the favors of Linda Stakallo. It wasn’t much of a contest. David was taller than me and was getting handsomer by the minute. So I formed another central friendship with a mutual friend and together we proceeded to explore the mysteries of girls at make-out parties that David and I had only fanaticized about. I learned toward the end of the school year that David was going to high school at a seminary; and I was about as shocked to learn of this as he was to learn that I was going to a Catholic military school. I now theorize that for both of us it was a temporary dodge from a normal high school as neither one of us graduated from the schools we originally selected. As much as we wanted to plunge into adolescence, I think it scared both of us.

After grammar school we went our separate ways. I saw David just one more time. I was cutting up a tree in our front yard when he pulled into our driveway. He was on his way out of town and just wanted to say hello. We spent a few minutes talking about our lives and sharing our aspirations. And that was that. A short time later I heard he was doing theater off Broadway, then we saw him on TV specials, and then the Big Screen. When I saw him in Firefox with Clint Eastwood I knew he made it big. And I’ll be damned if he hadn’t gotten handsomer.

I’d get together with old friends who knew David in grade school—industrial salesmen mostly, and me, the starving artist—and we’d discuss David’s brink of superstardom with heartfelt pride that we actually knew this fellow. Huge success was happening to good ole’ Dave, our Dave. He wasn’t remembered for being an athlete or a scholar, but for being one hell of a nice guy. He was that, and more. He was a creative and generous soul whose brief body of work spread more joy around the world than most of us from St. Joe’s could ever hope to spread in a lifetime. I’m one of many who miss him.

Posted By Tom Norpell : April 9, 2013 10:11 am

David and I met as classmates at the Catholic grammar school in Downers Grove, Illinois we attended in the 1950s. I knew him from the earliest grades, but by seventh grade we had become the best of friends. He lived on the north side of town and I lived on the south side, way south, where my dentist father had bought a home on three acres he dubbed “Tooth Acres.” Farm fields long past their productive years surrounded our home—some then transforming into subdivisions—and beyond these, acres of native woodlands. It was just the sort of environment a couple of newly minted teenagers would love to roam. It was apparent early on that David and I shared a great pleasure in just hanging out in the natural world.

One of our frequent stops was an old, abandoned house where we had gained entry through a basement window out of view of the neighbors. All its modest, vintage furnishings were still in place, including an upright piano. The kitchen cabinets were stacked with plates and glassware; the dressers were stuffed with dark clothes whose woolly odor I can clearly recall; and the small attic was crammed with traveler’s trunks and glass kerosene lanterns from before the household went electric. It looked like its inhabitants suddenly up and left decades previously, leaving everything behind just as it was. In the attic’s wooden trunks we found old letters and books written in German. We discovered sepia photos and tintype images, some of which had been artistically painted over to serve as family portraits. Soon we were piecing together fragments of the Heinke’s lives to arrive at a composite picture. Why they abandoned their home was a mystery David liked to ponder by creating endless scenarios about what may have happened to them. I mistakenly shared the location of our mystery house to others in the neighborhood, and on my 13th birthday someone burned the house down. The boy we all suspected of torching it would later become a psychologist.

On special Saturdays, David’s father drove us to one of several forest preserves. Dad took solitary walks or sat in his car listening to the Cubs game while David and I explored the woods and waterways. David often brought his old flintlock rifle with him, one whose hammer had partially broken off. The only way to cock it was to set the butt on the ground and push the hammer back with one’s shoe. All this for a cheap little click when you pulled the trigger. Sometimes we battled Indians; sometimes we fought Nazis. Though we were growing out of such child’s play, David played his parts with gusto. His sound effects of rifle bursts and explosions were among the best I ever heard. On the way home he would lean forward in his seat at some point, turn to me and pronounce enthusiastically, “Some fun, eh Tom?”

David and I were friends at a time when our young bodies were getting their first surge of testosterone. We spent many an overnight in my “clubhouse” discussing the mysteries of girls and the mechanics of making out with them. (I had saved gift and allowance money to a whopping $119.00 which my dad used to purchase a small utility building set at the edge of our property that came to be known as my clubhouse). Early on, the clubhouse was fashioned into a tiny church where I’d say mass for my father. Playing priest was great fun. I painted a Hopalong Cassidy lunchbox gold and stood it on end to serve as my tabernacle. I flattened circles of Wonder Bread with my Mom’s steam iron to turn them into communion hosts. Dad often attended my masses, patiently listening to my sermon on St. Blaise, a Catholic Bishop in the third century who performed a miraculous cure on a little boy who had a fish bone stuck in his throat. With prayer, the bone disappeared. It was the only sermon I knew, and my father must have heard it dozens of times.

By the time David and I were becoming good buddies my little church gave way to a clubhouse, a kind of pubescent boy’s cave where we retreated to smoke cigarettes and further ponder the mysteries of girls and sex, and issue updates on our public hair growth. Public hair was one of our great concerns at the time. David wore a jock strap under his Jockey shorts every day. He said it made him sweat down there, and, like watering a garden, it made his pubes grow faster.

David and I shared the dubious distinction of having been simultaneously undressed by one of the nuns at St. Joseph’s Grammar School. The incident began when $11.00 in cash brought in by Paulette Zap to pay her yearly uniform rental fee for the short-sleeved white blouse and blue pleated skirt the girls wore every day. But the money was missing when Paulette returned from recess and thus began Sister’s mission to cajole the stolen money into her pocket. Sister’s prelude of hell-fire damnation and the special places in hell reserved for thieves preceded her handing out little envelopes for the thief to return the money. When no money came back, Sister sent them out again. This time I got David’s attention and slipped a blank piece of paper into my envelope in what was a lame attempt to make a joke. Again, no money was returned. But in the Gestapo atmosphere that was a Catholic Grammar School in the 1950s, somebody obviously turned us in to Sister.

After noon recess, David and I were called into the hallway to be escorted by the Music Sister to her first floor music room, a space just large enough for a baby grand and Sister’s small desk. Sister directed us to opposite corners of the room and proceeded to order us to remove our clothes one article at a time. It was the first time in my life I experienced a surreal decoupling from reality. Sister examined each item of clothing until David and me were down to our underpants, the outside of which she gave a quick frisk for the little wad of paper money. Finding no money, we were ordered to dress. We returned to the classroom, no doubt flushed with shame (Catholic logic: when violated, feel shame, not outrage). We told our parents about the incident that evening and they talked to one another before calling the Sister’s convent to demand an explanation. Somehow the wily nuns were able to mollify our parents’ anger and soon the incident was behind us. For me, it was one of those many experiences that made me the Recovering Catholic that I am to this day.

Dave was always up for a new adventure. Sometime during the summer between seventh and eighth grade, he took me to the Candy Castle on north Main Street. I had been there many times shopping for penny candy, gag gifts or a new Halloween mask. The classic gags were all there: palm buzzers, fake vomit, fake dog poop, whoopee cushions and hundreds of other amusements, all designed to make you laugh and make others cringe. Confections and novelties occupied the front half of the long, narrow store. The rear half was another world entirely—scary for me, compelling for David—a land of dark mahogany booths where the owner served Cherry Cokes and Green Rivers to his special clientele: the hoods of Downers Grove Community High School. They sat with their girl friends in a fog of cigarette smoke, a twilight world dimly illuminated by the diffuse, gaudy light of a jukebox playing Elvis and Fabian continuously. A forbidden place for me, David convinced me to cross the line and take a booth, he leading the way with all the aplomb of a real hood. Before we went in, David stopped to roll the ends of his short-sleeved shirt up a couple times to impart the correct hoody look, which complimented his Hollywood haircut—long on the sides topped by a flattop. It was another disassociation for me, though, as I sat in this foreign land. David casually tamped his Lucky Strike on the tabletop and opened his Zippo with a sharp snap, then languidly formed perfect smoke rings, I sucked my Green River dry in moments and then pleaded, “So, are we ready to go now?” David was in no hurry. He lingered in the role that came to life in that atmosphere, that staging, of the Candy Castle.

When my older sister married just before I started eighth grade, she asked me to select my best friend to be her altar boys for her wedding mass. Naturally, I selected David. My sister still has the film-to-video record of the ceremony showing glimpses of David and me serving mass. I took the Book and he took the Bells—shorthand for the two distinct series of duties of an altar boy serving mass. But in that final year of grammar school our friendship ebbed. Truth is, the uncoupling may have started with our becoming rivals when we both tried to win the favors of Linda Stakallo. It wasn’t much of a contest. David was taller than me and was getting handsomer by the minute. So I formed another central friendship with a mutual friend and together we proceeded to explore the mysteries of girls at make-out parties that David and I had only fanaticized about. I learned toward the end of the school year that David was going to high school at a seminary; and I was about as shocked to learn of this as he was to learn that I was going to a Catholic military school. I now theorize that for both of us it was a temporary dodge from a normal high school as neither one of us graduated from the schools we originally selected. As much as we wanted to plunge into adolescence, I think it scared both of us.

After grammar school we went our separate ways. I saw David just one more time. I was cutting up a tree in our front yard when he pulled into our driveway. He was on his way out of town and just wanted to say hello. We spent a few minutes talking about our lives and sharing our aspirations. And that was that. A short time later I heard he was doing theater off Broadway, then we saw him on TV specials, and then the Big Screen. When I saw him in Firefox with Clint Eastwood I knew he made it big. And I’ll be damned if he hadn’t gotten handsomer.

I’d get together with old friends who knew David in grade school—industrial salesmen mostly, and me, the starving artist—and we’d discuss David’s brink of superstardom with heartfelt pride that we actually knew this fellow. Huge success was happening to good ole’ Dave, our Dave. He wasn’t remembered for being an athlete or a scholar, but for being one hell of a nice guy. He was that, and more. He was a creative and generous soul whose brief body of work spread more joy around the world than most of us from St. Joe’s could ever hope to spread in a lifetime. I’m one of many who miss him.

Posted By medusamorlock : April 10, 2013 12:00 am

Tom — What a thrill to have your memories shared with us. I think that all of us fans — and there are clearly a lot — who have not forgotten him are loving these stories.

Though David isn’t here to keep his own legacy alive, all of us are doing so, and especially you and others who shared personal memories. It makes the rest of us so happy that the real David seems to be just as charming and decent as he appeared onscreen. The way he passed away shows that, too. Helping someone, trying to right a wrong.

Thank you so much for contributing here!

- Medusa

Posted By medusamorlock : April 10, 2013 12:00 am

Tom — What a thrill to have your memories shared with us. I think that all of us fans — and there are clearly a lot — who have not forgotten him are loving these stories.

Though David isn’t here to keep his own legacy alive, all of us are doing so, and especially you and others who shared personal memories. It makes the rest of us so happy that the real David seems to be just as charming and decent as he appeared onscreen. The way he passed away shows that, too. Helping someone, trying to right a wrong.

Thank you so much for contributing here!

- Medusa

Posted By medusamorlock : April 10, 2013 2:50 pm

Tom, may I also say that your own career has produced such amazing work. I hope you don’t mind me putting your website here because it is fascinating work and especially just up my alley as I love miniatures of all kinds. David would have been no doubt very happy to know that your artistic vision turned out to be both appreciated and unique.

http://www.tomnorpell.com/

Thanks again for writing this beautiful memoir of David Huffman.

- medusa xoxoxo

Posted By medusamorlock : April 10, 2013 2:50 pm

Tom, may I also say that your own career has produced such amazing work. I hope you don’t mind me putting your website here because it is fascinating work and especially just up my alley as I love miniatures of all kinds. David would have been no doubt very happy to know that your artistic vision turned out to be both appreciated and unique.

http://www.tomnorpell.com/

Thanks again for writing this beautiful memoir of David Huffman.

- medusa xoxoxo

Posted By Thomas Norpell : April 10, 2013 3:07 pm

Medusa,

I would be honored to have a link to my website on or near David’s page. Thank you for your kind comments about my memoir and my work.

Warm regards, Tom

Posted By Thomas Norpell : April 10, 2013 3:07 pm

Medusa,

I would be honored to have a link to my website on or near David’s page. Thank you for your kind comments about my memoir and my work.

Warm regards, Tom

Posted By Cheri : July 22, 2013 10:03 pm

I just discovered ‘Testimony of Two Men’ on DVD this year. Watching it and ‘Captains of the Kings’ I noticed David Huffman. (I had seen these two movies on TV when they were first on.) I was so saddened to learn of his fate! Thanks for all of the information and stories. A life cut short by an illegal.

Posted By Philip Huffman : August 21, 2013 1:12 pm

Hello All,

Let me first say that I am extremely touched by all of the responses to this article. It moves me more than you know to see how much my father touched all of you, and to see his memory is still alive in 2013 is truly remarkable. I haven’t been able to read all of them but I have printed them out and will read them when I am up for it. Thank you for all of the kind thoughts for me and my family. My brother Matt and I are doing well and are both in the entertainment business so the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree! My mother eventually remarried a wonderful man who has been with us for over 20 years and was truly a god-send that kept our family together and safe through a very trying time.

My mother thankfully kept us fairly shielded from the trial details but after reading some of these responses I was wondering if anyone knew how to find out if my father’s killer has been released or not. I thought the system would have to inform me of his release, but I understand that might be naive thinking. If anyone has any idea how to go about that I would greatly appreciate it.

My father was an amazing man/father/husband/actor and to see everyone’s responses is extremely heart warming to say the least. Thank you Medusa for keeping his memory alive.

Posted By MedusaMorlock : August 21, 2013 5:17 pm

Philip, we are all so grateful that you have found this and know that your father touched so many with his talent and his humanity. There are some wonderful posts here from classmates, friends and relatives of your father which will be particularly dear to you, I believe.

I was thinking about your family the other day when I was watching the recent “Casting By” documentary about Marion Dougherty (now on HBO); among the photos shown of the many casting professionals who were influenced and helped by Marion there was one of your mother Phyllis. How nice to see her remembered there.

All of us here are so pleased that you and your brother have gone into the business that was so enriched by your father and mother.

In terms of your question about Mr. Villanueva — I believe I have found the answer. Consulting the State of California Inmate Locator — http://inmatelocator.cdcr.ca.gov/Results.aspx — and looking under Villanueva-Samano, Genaro, it appears that he is still incarcerated.
Details: VILLANUEVA-SAMANO, GENARO D30762 45 06/24/1986 SATF-CSP

The facility is the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran (SATF-CSP, Corcoran).

In reading some articles which were not available at the time I wrote the original post, it appears that G V-S was sentenced to the maximum of 26 years to life, in which case he might not be released anytime soon. Perhaps you can do some further inquiries, but you have the info now that is publicly available, at least. You might also want to review the info here at the Victim and Survivor Rights & Services http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Victim_Services/parole_hearing_info.html where you evidently can request that you be notified of any hearings. California may not know where to contact you and it looks like this is the place to give them that info. It sounds like you are now ready to look into some of this unpleasant business, but in doing so you are honoring your family.

Please let us know if we can do anything else for you. Thank you for visiting us here. We love you and your brother. xoxoxox

Posted By Kathy in San Diego : August 21, 2013 7:15 pm

Philip,

I am so relieved to read your email! I think you might find information in the San Diego Union Tribune archives. I will see if I can find anything locally. I still work in Balboa Park within view of the Old Globe, and I often think of your dad.

Take care!

Posted By medusamorlock : August 22, 2013 3:53 pm

I wanted to add something that I just found at this URL http://www.sandiegodaannualreport.com/2011/pages/divisions/case_issuance_extradition.html

Lifer Hearing Unit

The DA’s Lifer Hearing Unit has two main goals: to ensure that dangerous prisoners with life sentences are not released carelessly and to ensure that crime victims and their families are given an opportunity to participate in the parole hearing process. Last year, the Lifer Hearing Unit processed 250 cases for parole suitability hearings. There were 120 lifer parole hearings, with 35 inmates receiving parole grants from the California Board of Parole Hearings. Eighty-five inmates were denied parole at their hearings. Four of the 35 parole grants were overturned by Governor Brown.

High-Profile Lifer Hearings handled in 2011 included:
■Genaro Villanueva was denied parole for 15 years in December 2011. Villanueva murdered beloved character actor, David Huffman. When Huffman interrupted Villanueva committing a burglary in a motor home in 1985, Villanueva brutally stabbed the actor to death.

That seems to give us some more info and show that this murderer will not be getting out of prison for a long time more.

Posted By Tom Norpell : August 22, 2013 4:20 pm

Justice is sweet!

Posted By R.T. : August 26, 2013 2:52 pm

Hi…I was part of that group of school children that found his body. I have been going to Balboa Hospital a lot lately for appointments so I have to drive by Balboa Park to get to the hospital. I started wondering what it was about a certain area of the park that had me thinking this place looks so familiar. I finally realized what it was. I remembered the field trip and my classmates crying and all the teachers trying to keep us from seeing what was discovered there. It’s still a little hazy but I do remember seeing his legs. I guess all these years I had just suppressed it. I just find it ironic that I am remembering all this and I am David’s age now when he died at 39. I moved out of the SD county years ago but I moved back about 9 yrs ago only because I am a military wife.. I live about an hour away from the city of SD..…I just work here and I go to Balboa Hospital once in a while. But lately I’ve been going so often that it brought back this memory of what had happened there….So I started googling to find out more about who he was. I was young but I do remember hearing days later that he was an actor, so that made it easier to google info… I was glad to find this article and to finally know his name and the details of what happened and how he died a hero.

Posted By medusamorlock : August 26, 2013 4:58 pm

RT, what a disturbing experience that must have been, and thank you very much for going deep into the past and sharing this with us.

I’m so glad that you found us here; as you can see, David Huffman has been remembered by fans, friends and family for these many years, and will continue to be held up as a model for true heroism and decency.

Thanks for visiting us here.

Posted By SUGAR XYLER : August 30, 2013 4:12 pm

*_* THE ACTOR RAUL JULIA THOUGHT HIGHLY OF DAVID’S WIFE. RAUL AND PHYLLIS MET THROUGH CLINT EASTWOOD’S FILM THE ROOKIE.IN THE SEVEN YEARS THAT I WAS CLOSE TO RAUL HE SPOKE OF PHYLLIS VERY KINDLY.RAUL SAID THAT DAVID WAS A HERO BEYOND WORDS FOR HIS ACTIONS THAT DREADFUL DAY.HAVING TWO SONS OF HIS OWN,RAUL KEPT DAVID’S SONS IN HIS THOUGHTS AND ALWAYS WISHED THEM PEACE.

Posted By Mike Rebholz : October 7, 2013 4:00 pm

The class of 1963, St. Bede Academy, Peru, Il just gathered (Oct 4&5, 2013) and celebrated the 50th class reunion. Dave was a member of our class. Dave was a boarder (lived at the academy) for four years. At the reunion, Dave was remembered by all.
He could run fast, was a good student and was in all the plays. I remember he broke his collarbone in football. Others said he broke his leg but I don’t know that for sure. I also remember he had a cut lip in a minor fist-o-cuffs, as boys will.
I sat behind him in one class, which class I don’t remember. But I do remember a little character he used to draw, it had one eye, a wide mouth, a pot belly, hair sticking out of its ears and knuckles that dragged on the ground. I used to pass time in study hall drawing too.
He moved in different circles than me so we didn’t become buddies or anything but we played intramural sports with and against each other.
I was always proud of the fact that one of us was in the movies. Many classmates went into the military, survived and lived our lives. Some are dead now.
I found this website when I took a chance and searched for Dave to find out what happened to him (we knew he died but there were many differing stories of what happened). One classmate(ex marine) commented that the first thing he learned in the corp. was not to pursue the enemy because he will lead you into an ambush.
We sure would have liked to see him and all the others that are gone. Que Sera Sera. I see that his wife has passed but he had children. To his children I send my deepest sympathies because they will and are missing him the most.
Mike W. Rebholz
Classmate, Class of 1963

Posted By MedusaMorlock : October 19, 2013 9:39 pm

Sugar Xyler, thanks for the memories about Raul Julia, Phyllis and David. David touched so many during his life and so many still long after his passing. Thank you for sharing this with us.

And thank you very much, Mike, for these lovely thoughts about David. Knowing that he is remembered by his classmates, as well as his friends, fans and family, is fitting and so good to hear.

So glad that you both found us here.

Posted By Marilyn McCunn : August 8, 2014 11:40 pm

It has been such a thrill to read more of these postings about David (and Phyllis) since he is one of my family ancestors, being related to the Dippel family through his mother, Opal. My grandparents are also of the Dippel family. Members of our family visited with David and his family, met Phyllis and the boys several times. We were growing very proud of them both when the tragedy hit, and then we lost Phyllis as well. Now I am proud to learn that the boys are following in their footsteps and doing well in the entertainment industry. I would love to contact them and carry on a familial connection but don’t want to interrupt their lives. If its meant to be, we will make that connection.

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